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Free Perseus Update: Understand Scriptural Context with Ancient Texts

Two years ago, Logos made nearly 1,500 Perseus Project books available for free. Now we’re pleased to announce an update that makes the Perseus Classics Collection—a library of some of the West’s most influential, enduring works—even more valuable.

A wealth of primary sources

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If you’re looking to understand Scripture’s context, the Perseus Classics Collection provides a rich assortment of primary documents from the ancient and classical worlds.

Upon release, the Greek Perseus texts already included lemma and morph tagging. That means they enhance your Bible Word Study reports, which pull not only from the New Testament but also from Perseus’ hundreds of Greek texts, helping you understand Greek words’ context.

Additionally, lexicons that cite classical sources link to the Perseus texts. In the Liddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon, for example, you can jump from citations of Aristotle or Aeschylus to the Perseus editions themselves, saving you time and providing insight into particular instances of a word’s use. Continue Reading…

Back-to-School Savings on the Paul’s Letters Collection

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collection (1)Students everywhere are buying textbooks and stuffing their backpacks to start a new year of learning. If you’re feeling a bit nostalgic, Logos has you covered. The Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection is now available at back-to-school pricing—it normally costs $534.95, but you can use coupon code BTS2013 to get it for only $429.95 through Friday!

Understanding Paul’s letters is an important part of any Christian’s study. His epistles to the early churches and to his colaborers for Christ make up the majority of the New Testament. This collection of Lexham Bible Guides—one volume for each of Paul’s letters—opens these texts to you in a new and deeper way, guiding you to a fuller understanding of the exegetical and theological issues of Paul’s writings.

Christ Hymn

Continue Reading…

Last Chance: Get Big Back-to-School Savings!

back to school

Time is running out to get deep discounts on some of our top academic products. Until September 13, use coupon code BTS2013 to get big back-to-school savings.

Hermeneia and Continental Commentaries (68 vols.)

Regularly $1,349.95: get $660 off with coupon code BTS2013

This series represents some of the best in recent biblical scholarship. It makes use of the full range of philological and historical tools, including textual criticism and the methods of the history of tradition and the history of religion.

Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (6 vols.)

Regularly $269.95: get $70 off with coupon code BTS2013

This six-volume, 7,200-page reference is one of the most comprehensive, up-to-date, and authoritative works in the field. A staple of biblical and theological scholarship, it features more than 6,000 entries by 800 leading international scholars.

Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection (13 vols.)

Regularly $534.95: get $105 off with coupon code BTS2013

Not only did Paul establish churches throughout the ancient world—he also authored much of the New Testament. Understanding the exegetical and theological issues of Paul’s letters represents an important part of any Christian’s study. The Lexham Bible Guides walk you through summaries of a broad range of views, helping you gain a thorough and fresh perspective on Paul’s letters.

Liddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon (LSJ)

Regularly $135: get $15 off with coupon code BTS2013

This indispensable resource is the central reference work for scholars of ancient Greek authors and texts discovered up to 1940, from the eleventh century BC to the Byzantine Period. This title covers early Greek authors (such as Homer and Hesiod), classical Greek, and the Greek Old and New Testaments. Each entry lists not only the definition of a word, but also its irregular inflections, plus quotations from a full range of authors and sources to demonstrate usage.

German Bible Society Bundle: Student Edition

Regularly $217.95: get $100 off with coupon code BTS2013

This must-have bundle, customized for Bible college and seminary students working with Greek and Hebrew, includes original-language texts that every scholar needs. You’ll get access to the critical texts and apparatuses for the NA27, BHS, BHQ, Septuagint, and Vulgate, plus two reference works.

BDAG/HALOT Bundle

Regularly $274.95: get $25 off with coupon code BTS2013

Widely recognized as the standard modern dictionary for biblical Hebrew, the Logos edition of BDAG/HALOT provides you with one-click lexical information. This bundle integrates seamlessly with the rest of your resources—you can easily search Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and English transliterations. All cross-references and biblical references include hyperlinks to articles and biblical texts, so it’s easy to keep learning.

Don’t miss out—take advantage of major discounts on back-to-school products today!

 

The Clock’s Running Out on Upgrade Discounts

Base Packages IIIf you’re looking to save a bundle on your Logos 5 upgrade, you’ll have to hurry. The special upgrade sale ends September 30!

Act soon and you can still combine your Logos 5 upgrade discount with the Dynamic Pricing ownership discount. This ownership discount subtracts the cost of books that are already in your library—in addition to the significant upgrade discounts, we’re cutting out the cost of resources you already own.

When you factor in the opportunity to spread out your payments for up to 18 months with an interest-free payment plan, there just isn’t going to be a better time to upgrade to Logos 5.

On top of the special offers available on Logos 5 upgrades, you can also get huge discounts on special topic-specific bundles to help you build a library that fits your interests. These bundles include resources centered on New Testament studies, Greek, archaeology, church history, counseling, and so much more. Or add nearly 1,200 books to your new library with the immense Master Bundle!

Whether you’re coming from an earlier iteration of Logos Bible Software or you own Logos 5 and want the best price on the features and resources you’re missing, check out your special pricing with the Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator.

Need a little more info?

We’ve been working on creating a compelling case for upgrading now. If you’re considering an upgrade but want to do a little more research, check out these posts:

Features:

Don’t wait any longer to make the jump to Logos 5—the upgrade sale ends September 30! If you don’t get in on this opportunity, you’re going to wish you had. Upgrade now!

Get the Best Deal on a Logos 5 Upgrade

Logos 5You have two ways to get a special deal on Logos 5: Dynamic Pricing, and your custom upgrade discount. When you couple these offers, you get personalized savings on the world’s most advanced Bible software.

Dynamic Pricing: never pay for the same title twice

This pricing option gives you extra discounts based on the content you own. Regardless of when you bought your resources—10 days ago, 20 years ago—you get credit for the titles already in your library. All you need to do is own at least one title included in the base package you want: you’ll get extra savings when you upgrade. The more titles you own, the bigger your upgrade discount!

Custom upgrade discount: everyone’s best deal

The Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator builds on Dynamic Pricing by taking into account everything in your Logos library—including resources and datasets—and giving you a customized price that guarantees you only pay for what’s new to you.

Even if you don’t own a base package, but you’ve still purchased commentaries and collections (or even part of a collection), your resources will contribute to your discount. If you’re using your resources in an older version of Logos, like Logos 1.0 or Libronix, no worries—these titles factor into your custom upgrade discount, too.

Get limited-time savings when you upgrade: just log in to your Logos.com account and the Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator will do the work for you!

Payment plans: the icing on the cake

In addition to getting special discounts when you upgrade, you can lighten the payment load by taking advantage of Logos payment plans. Our 18-month, interest-free plans give you the best of both worlds: you can make your payments more manageable by spacing them out, and you can start using Logos 5 right away.

You’re running out of time to upgrade at the best price! Get credit for the resources you already own, take advantage of limited-time upgrade discounts, and start using budget-friendly payment plans: upgrade today to get your best deal on Logos 5

Why Postmodernism Isn’t New

ancient-philosophy-bundle“Every age has its own outlook,” wrote C. S. Lewis; “We, therefore, need the books that will correct the characteristic mistakes of our own period.” But we need more than that—we need books that reach our conclusions long before we do, books that remind us that our new outlook isn’t so new after all.

We call our times postmodern, often with something like fear. But postmodernism is in large part a renovation of ancient ideas—ideas you should know.

Postmodernists say:

“Right and wrong are human interpretations”

Though moral relativism has a postmodern flavor, it dates back to the ancient Greeks. Plato ascribed it to Protagoras; later, Herodotus assessed other cultures’ customs without questioning their rightness and wrongness. Later yet, Sextus Empiricus determined not that morality is relative to culture, but that moral knowledge is itself impossible.

Is moral relativism postmodern? Yes, in the sense that it exists today; no, in the sense that it’s uniquely characteristic of postmodernism. Before your next debate on moral relativism, you should read Plato, who, fearing moral chaos, argued that morality must be not only in the actor’s self-interest but also based on objective truth.

“But objective truth doesn’t exist!”

We usually trace this postmodern claim back to Nietzsche’s assertion that there are no facts, only interpretations. But it, too, has ancient roots: in the fifth century BC, Protagoras argued that “Man is the measure of all things.” Later, Plato and Socrates clashed with the Sophists over the nature of absolute truth: while the Sophists venerated persuasion and rhetoric, Plato and Socrates responded that the measure of an argument isn’t its persuasiveness, but its truthfulness.

Much later, Kant argued that truth is merely nominal (“true” means something within language), not real—not a statement about a thing’s essence. “Kant drew out the limits of our mind,” said Hegel, “and because of this we can not have a knowledge of the absolute truth.” But Hegel still found a way to truth: his “dialectic,” which, like science, moves from increasingly accurate oppositions—thesis, antithesis—to synthesis, the resolution that best corresponds to what is real.

“What we experience isn’t the world—it’s just our perceptions of the world”

modern-philosophy-bundleAgain we turn to Plato. In The Republic, his Socrates explains that without philosophy, we are like bound prisoners in a cave who, having seen nothing else all our lives, see shadows on the wall and interpret them as real things. Without philosophy, Plato claims, we mistake erroneous perceptions for reality; with philosophy, we see the world as it really is. Around two thousand years later, though, Descartes argued that wax’s physical characteristics reveal nothing about the wax itself: after all, its color, scent, shape, size, hardness, and coldness are all subject to change. George Berkeley took doubt even further, arguing that the world doesn’t even exist: only our perceptions of it do. (Sound postmodern?)

But Thomas Reid rejected that notion in compelling terms, arguing that common-sense belief in the world is the basis for all philosophy—that if you don’t believe in the world as perceived, the conversation is useless.

“We don’t have individual identities or souls”

Postmodernists from Foucault to Lacan to Riceour have argued that personal identity is unstable—that, without any essential “I,” we identify with images or stories to define ourselves. This thesis of shifting (or nonexistent) identity smacks of postmodernity, but it, too, is ancient. Plutarch wrote, in the first century AD, “Dead is the man of yesterday, for he is passed into the man of today . . . Nobody remains one person.” Heraclitus wrote that we cannot step into the same river twice: not only has the river changed; we have, too. Much later, Hume took Berkeley’s claim (“the physical world doesn’t exist”) even further, arguing that not even individuals really exist—we’re nothing but perceivers of perceptions.

But if the claims are old, so are the counterarguments. Spinoza argued that all things do have an essence, and that the nature of that essence is to persist in its being. Descartes argued, famously, that because we think, we exist.

* * *

To engage with our time’s prevailing ideas, you need to know where they come from—you need to know philosophy, both ancient and modern. Noet’s Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles equip you with the core texts of the Western philosophical tradition: Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

Pre-order the Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles today, or build your library with the comprehensive Classical Foundations Bundle—everything you need to understand the origins of Western thought.

Then keep reading—where did history come from?

Now Available: Evangelical Exegetical Commentary on Song of Songs

eecThe Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (EEC) is a unique publishing project. Designed for digital, it features the latest in biblical scholarship, looks at application and devotional implications, and is written from a distinctly evangelical perspective. Since it was announced in 2010, five volumes have been released: 1, 2 & 3 John, Exodus, Ezra & Nehemiah, James, and Philemon.

We’re excited to announce the latest release in the series: Song of Songs, by A. Boyd Luter. Luter currently serves as adjunct online professor of New Testament at Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. He’s been a pastor, and has also taught at Crichton College, LeTourneau University, Talbot School of Theology, Cedarville University, Criswell College, Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, Ashland Theological Seminary, and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is a coauthor of Ruth and Esther: God behind the Seen, and wrote the notes on Luke, Galatians, and Revelation for the HCSB Study Bible.

In his EEC volume, Luter argues that the Song of Songs can be divided into seven sections, taking a young couple from their initial longings and expressions of affection for each other to their wedding day, and on to the various struggles that threaten to derail their love. For each section, Luter comments on the text and background and provides helpful suggestions on how it might be preached and applied today.

Song of Songs makes up half of the EEC volume on Ecclesiastes & Song of Songs. The Ecclesiastes portion, by Bob McCabe, is forthcoming. If you’ve purchased the EEC, you’ll receive Song of Songs automatically, with no additional purchase required.

If you haven’t purchased the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary series, get it today!

Are You Studying These 4 Key Resources?

Logos Base PackagesAll of Logos 5′s features appear in Gold and above. When you upgrade to Platinum, Diamond, or Portfolio, what you’re investing in is valuable, often hard-to-find content, bundled to give you the best deal.

Here are four key resources included only in Portfolio:

1. BDAG/HALOTA Greek–English Lexicon of the New Testament (BDAG) and the Hebrew & Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament (HALOT) stand as the authoritative texts on biblical grammar. These resources are must-haves for anyone looking to grasp original-language nuance. Jerker Blomqvist wrote in the Bryn Mawr Classical Review that BDAG “is without doubt the best tool of its kind that exists in any language, and the present edition is decidedly superior to the earlier ones.”

Most scholars pay extra to add the BDAG/HALOT bundle to their libraries—but if you upgrade to Portfolio, you won’t have to.

2. A. W. Pink Collection (40 vols.)—Widely considered the intellectual successor to Charles Spurgeon, A. W. Pink wrote widely about Christian doctrine and timeless cultural issues. Biographer Iain H. Murray notes that the widespread (and posthumous) circulation of Pink’s works “made him one of the most influential evangelical authors in the second half of the twentieth century.” With Portfolio, you can trace this important writer’s thought across 40 books, plus 68 pamphlets and booklets. Continue Reading…

Get up to $370 off the Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library

anchor-yale-bible-reference-libraryThrough September 30, you can use coupon code AYBRL13 to get up to $370 off the Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library!

Groundbreaking scholarship

The Anchor Yale Bible series presents the best contemporary scholarship in a way that’s accessible not only to scholars but to anyone looking to expand their biblical knowledge—a tradition established half a century ago by series founders William Foxwell Albright and David Noel Freedman.

Respected contributors

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library offers works by 23 of the most respected scholars, pastors, and teachers:

A wide variety of topics

The Anchor Yale Bible Reference Library is intended for the broadest possible readership, ranging from world-class scholars to general readers dedicated to expanding their knowledge of the Bible and its world. Continue Reading…

Free Book: George Müller’s Jehovah Magnified

Jehovah Magnified

Through September, you can get George Müller’s Jehovah Magnified: Addresses absolutely free! Download it today, and then enter to win the complete 12-volume collection of Müller’s works.

George Müller was gifted with an outstanding intellect, tremendous compassion, and an extraordinary faith in God. He made it his life’s mission to care for the poor and spread the Word of God, building orphanages that housed thousands of children and preaching in over 40 countries. He never asked for financial support, but relied wholly on God to provide for himself and his orphans.

“George Müller’s life was one long witness to the prayer-hearing God; and, throughout, God bore him witness that his prayers were heard and his work accepted. The pages of his journal are full of striking examples of this witness. . . .”

—Arthur T. Pierson

Jehovah Magnified: Addresses contains 34 addresses on stories from the Bible, theological topics, practical living, charity, and more. Get it free during September, and experience the power of Müller’s unrelenting faith.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download Jehovah Magnified: Addresses right now! You can also enter to win the complete 12-volume collection of George Müller’s works.