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Broadus on Sin

John A. Broadus

These posts are supposed to be Logos-related so I might be stretching it a bit with this one…

I recently bought a book by D. A. Carson called Becoming Conversant with the Emerging Church that I hoped would be an intelligent critique of the emerging church “not-a-movement.” I’m still not sure whether it is intelligent or anything else because my wife started reading it before I got a chance to pick it up.

But one paragraph she read aloud came to mind today…

Some leader, perhaps Mike Yaconelli, was quoted as saying that we don’t need to talk about sin anymore. People these days know all about their sin …it’s the message of grace that they need to hear.

Personally, I’m not ready to stop hearing about my sin because I don’t think I take it seriously enough. It doesn’t grieve me the way it ought, and I don’t hate it as passionately as I ought. All in all, I think our age takes sin very lightly compared with at least some ages past.

In fact, downplaying sin in preaching and hymnody is certainly not unique to any one movement or denomination; I would say it’s become a defining characteristic of whole swaths of Christendom. The point of this post is not to offer a critique of the emerging church movement but rather a counterpoint to our collective and individual willingness to get chummy with sin.
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IVP’s Ancient Christian Commentary in LDLS Format

The Ancient Christian Commentary Series (ACCS) from InterVarsity Press is one of my favorite in-process commentary series.

The first installment of the electronic edition of the ACCS, known as Volume 1, is now available. Twelve volumes of patristic power, arranged like a commentary, at your fingertips. I’m pretty stoked about this one, it is like having a selected reference index to the church fathers.

These volumes have excerpts from fathers cited in the Schaff edition (which Logos also has available in its entirety), but they are by no means limited to that well of wisdom and insight. Other lesser-known fathers are quoted too. Many of the quoted materials are provided in new translations.

If you’re interested in looking into how the early church interpreted and applied Scripture, then you should consider how this set might help you in your study. More information is availble on the series at the ACCS web site.

Greek Pseudepigrapha is Closing In!

Greek OT PseudepigraphaI’m sure many readers of the Logos Bible Software Blog already know this, but Logos has been planning an edition of the Greek Old Testament Pseudepigrapha.

It has been listed on our Pre-Publication page for awhile. But the confirmed pre-orders don’t quite cover our costs yet. They’re so very close (check out the thermometer on the prepub page) but not over the line.

We generally like to make sure our estimated costs are covered before something moves from “Gathering Interest” status to “Under Development” status.

If you aren’t familiar with this material but have some familiarity with Greek and using Greek-English lexicons, then you might want to check this out. One primary benefit of having things like the Greek Pseudepigrapha available in your library is the ability to look up secondary citations in the primary language. Of course the pseudepigrapha are not useful for establishment of doctrine; but they are helpful for comparative word studies, studies of grammatical phenomena, and for understanding more about the religious culture of the day.

So, if you haven’t given this one a look-see yet, maybe you should. While the pre-pub price is still relatively low. Here are some pages with more information:

Update (2005-10-21): It has come to my attention that the Greek Pseudepigrapha pre-pub has “crossed the line” and is now “Under Development”. Thanks to all who have pre-ordered; we’ll do our best to get the work done and the resource to you as quickly as we can!

The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac

Eugene FieldAmong the 5,000 books available for the Libronix Digital Library System there are a few that make people wonder, “Why did they produce that one?”

Years ago, someone gave our family a copy of The Works of Eugene Field. In high school I read a few volumes with mild interest before getting to the final volume, The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac, with which I fell promptly in love.

I was in my seventh year then, and I had learned to read I know not when. The back and current numbers of the “Well-Spring” had fallen prey to my insatiable appetite for literature. With the story of the small boy who stole a pin, repented of and confessed that crime, and then became a good and great man, I was as familiar as if I myself had invented that ingenious and instructive tale; I could lisp the moral numbers of Watts and the didactic hymns of Wesley, and the annual reports of the American Tract Society had already revealed to me the sphere of usefulness in which my grandmother hoped I would ultimately figure with discretion and zeal. And yet my heart was free; wholly untouched of that gentle yet deathless passion which was to become my delight, my inspiration, and my solace, it awaited the coming of its first love.

Eugene Field was a poet and journalist in the late 19th century (most famous now for Little Boy Blue and Wynken, Blynken, and Nod). His fanciful memoir of an old bibliomaniac delighted me; I found within it the name of my book obsession and license to revel in the malady.
I memorized the first chapter for recitation at a drama competition, and for years afterwards I pressed copies into the hands of fellow book lovers.

One of these fellow bibliomaniacs worked at Logos in our text production department. He took it upon himself to type the entire book and then presented it, fait accompli, in Logos format. And so it went into our collection as an unlock, with about five to ten copies sold each year.

So, is it useful for Bible study? No, but it is a delightful read if you are enchanted by chapter titles like “The Luxury of Reading in Bed,” “On the Odors Which My Books Exhale,” and “Our Debt to Monkish Men.” And now it is free.

Visual Filters and Verb Rivers (Part II)

Earlier, I wrote an article titled Visual Filters and Verb Rivers (Part I) in which I described the use of a particular visual filter, the Morphology Filter in the Biblical Languages Addin.

That article got long, and I promised to follow it up later. Well … it’s later. And this is the follow-up.
The Morphology Filter is good for word-level and paragraph-level work. That is, when you are reading through the text and noticing morphological trends, the Morphology Filter helps these sorts of things jump out at you.

Upon noticing what seems to be a concentration of a particular morphological criteria in a particular paragraph or section, the next question is: Does this happen elsewhere in the book, or is this unique? In other words, with the Morphology Filter, you’re looking at the trees (or perhaps a particular grove of trees). But you need to step back and look at the whole forest now. This is what Verb Rivers help you to do.

(Holding back the urge to mix metaphors and crack a joke about going “over the river and through the woods” … )

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We Did Remember Hebrew

It would not do to have a syntactically tagged Greek NT without something similar for the Hebrew text. So we are partnering with Francis Andersen and Dean Forbes to make their three decades of work available to you for display and searching, too.

Visual Filters and Verb Rivers (Part I)

I’ve been working through 1Ti 4.11-16 in my personal study. One thing that jumps out in this passage is the amount of imperative verbs relative to 1Ti 1.1-4.10. These six verses contain 10 imperatives; nine of them are in the second person singular (thus likely addressed to the reader, Timothy).

This is an important feature of the passage (and in the larger discourse of the epistle), and it should be looked into.

But how does Logos Bible Software help you become aware of this sort of thing? There are two features (at least) that help one “see” these things. Visual Filters and Verb Rivers. These are available in the Biblical Languages Addin, which is already a part of some Logos packages (see bottom of this product page for details).

This article explores what sort of information these addins convey.
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From Morphology to Syntax

Morphologically analyzed texts have been an important feature of Bible software packages for years. Logos offers several different morphological analyses for the Greek NT and we will soon have three different analyses for the Hebrew. Recently we announced or shipped analyzed versions of the Old Testament Greek Pseudepigrapha, the Apostolic Fathers in Greek, and the Works of Philo. (The Works of Josephus aren’t far behind.)

But what if you want to look at syntax? There have not been a lot of tools available. Logos is partnering with OpenText.org to change that, and you soon will be able to see (and search!) a syntactically annotated Greek NT. The image below is an early view of just one of the ways you will be able to use this data.

Books That Last

When we marketing types at Logos talk about the benefits of electronic books over print, one benefit we include in the list is that electronic books are not easily destroyed. We like to point out that our books do not mold, mildew, fall apart, or fade over time. And when a hard drive crashes or computer is stolen, book files are easily replaced and licenses restored from our servers.

The durability of electronic books can seem like a theoretical benefit until some kind of personal catastrophe or natural disaster makes it very real.

I’m reminded of this as our support department reports they are beginning to hear from users who lost everything to Hurricane Katrina and are calling to request a set of replacement discs and a regenerated license file. Having access to one’s books is certainly a very small comfort in light of the massive losses sustained by so many, but I’m glad that we can help provide even that small step in a return to everyday life.
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Community Pricing: Adolf Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East

Since Bob has brought up the subject of Community Pricing, I figure it’s time to write about one of my favorite references that is (and has been) on the community pricing page: Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East.

I can remember when I first started working through definitions in BAGD (the second English edition of Bauer’s lexicon, now superceded by BDAG). This was in the early to mid 1990′s. I’d just finished college, with a year of Greek under my belt, determined not to let it lapse. I’d asked my professor which books I needed, and he simply said “Get BAGD.” I went to the bookstore, and they ordered it — and told me it would be $70.00! I swallowed that pill, had them order it, and haven’t regretted it.

Because I’d spent that money, I used BAGD whenever I needed to look up a word — which was (and still is) frequently. And I soon noticed an oft-repeated abbreviation: LAE.

It only took me a few times to look that up in the abbreviation table (this was before the electronic edition was released by Logos) to associate it with Light from the Ancient East by Adolf Deissmann. It was cited frequently. I didn’t have a print copy, so I never bothered to look it up.

But I was the one missing out. Two or three years ago, I finally broke down and located a used print copy of LAE and dug in. I read it from cover to cover and soon saw that LAE contained excellent background information from papyri, inscriptions and ostraca. These materials are transcribed, translated and discussed. Photos or drawings exist for most materials, so you can actually see the item being discussed.

The discussions are the valuable part, from my perspective. Deissmann brings much to the table that can help one in examining infrequent New Testament words.

Allow me to present one example:
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