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Greek Syntax: Searching OpenText.org Material

I’ve briefly discussed searching OpenText.org material at the word level; this post discusses searching at the clause level, with word group level stuff in the mix.

There’s even a groovy video of the search I describe so you can see exactly what’s going on (see bottom of this article). One take, no cuts. This is done with the current beta version of Logos Bible Software (3.0 Beta 1) and an extra syntax searching component currently in development.

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Syntax: Andersen-Forbes Introduction

I was recently dispatched to Melbourne to visit Frank Andersen and Dean Forbes. One of the things I was assigned to discover — other than what kangaroo chili tastes like* — was the underlying linguistic/textual/grammatical philosophy of the Andersen-Forbes database (hereafter, A-F). Sure, they’ve marked the entire Hebrew Bible for syntax, but what exactly does that mean?

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Product Guides on Logos.com

Thanks to one of our resident book experts (and book developer), Vincent Setterholm, we have launched a series of product guides on the Logos.com website. So far, these guides provide a basic introduction to the categories and sub-categories of books available for Logos Bible Software in the areas of Greek, Hebrew, and Other Ancient Languages. We hope to add additional categories soon.

I think Vincent does a great job of guiding the site visitor through the plethora of Logos tools and texts available for biblical language study.
For example, did you know that we now offer 9 Greek grammars and 8 Hebrew grammars that range from beginning to advanced, learning to reference? Or that we have a growing number of tools for studying Aramaic and Syriac?

These guides help fill a need I mentioned in an earlier post here on the Logos Blog: a need for “…objectively-written guides to books on Logos.com to help our users navigate the 5,000 titles now available for the system, much like a bookstore owner who offers suggestions based not on his own likes and dislikes but based on his extensive knowledge of what’s available.”
Thanks for leading us around a few aisles of the bookstore, Vincent!

Biblical Counseling Library

The “Logos Pre-Pub Machine” has been in high gear for some time now…this week alone we shipped two significant, heavyweight products for biblical language study—Comfort & Barrett’s The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts and The Targums—while in the past 10 days we’ve posted three new prepubs to take their place.

One of these new prepubs breaks new ground for us, and that is the Biblical Counseling Library, posted to the prepub page just yesterday.
What’s novel about it is this: it’s a thematic collection bringing together 29 books from 20 authors and 10 publishers…all on subjects related to biblical counseling. We’ve done lots of author collections, publisher collections, and so on…but not really a large, thematic collection like this.

Some of the titles included are breakout bestsellers (e.g., I Kissed Dating Goodbye and Finishing Strong) while others are evergreen category standards (e.g., Competent to Counsel and Inside Out). Authors include Jay E. Adams, Larry Crabb, Elizabeth George, Steve Farrar, Steve Gallagher, Jerry Bridges and Francis Schaeffer. Publishers represented include Tyndale, Navpress, Zondervan, Multnomah, and Harvest House.

This collection is discounted 61% off the list prices of the 29 books included. Any pastor or layperson who counsels others—whether professionally or in an informal way—would do well to add them to their digital library.
You heard about it here first…the NewsWire email hasn’t yet been sent. More tools for ministry…let the Pre-Pub Machine roll on!

G’Day, Hebrew Syntax

You may have noticed I haven’t been blogging much lately. Mostly, I’ve been too busy working on the Andersen-Forbes Hebrew Syntax project. As part of that work, I recently went down to Melbourne, Australia to visit with Frank Andersen and Dean Forbes, the gentlemen themselves. It’s rare that the two of them are ever in the same room, since Dean lives in California and Frank lives half a world away in Melbourne. When we found out that Dean would be visiting Melbourne for a month to work with Frank, we decided that I should crash the party.*

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Greek Syntax: Using OpenText.org Word Groups

Last week, I posted an article about “Word Groups” in the OpenText.org Syntactic Annotation. I promised some follow-up; and now it’s time for that.

There are obvious uses for this level of annotation in the realm of searching, but what about in just reading the text? Or in working through a passage exegetically?

The good news is that the visualization (graph) supports most operations you’re used to performing from a standard morphologically tagged Greek NT in Logos Bible Software. This article is about some of those options.

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Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East now a pre-pub!

Last month, I blogged about Adolf Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East. It was a Community Pricing project that was close but not close enough to becoming a real, bona-fide Logos project.

Well, folks responded. I’m thrilled! Deissman’s work is now an official, in-production Logos pre-pub.

What does this mean?

Well, it means if you got in on the community pricing, you’re confirmed and only paying $10 for this baby.

If you get in on it from this point onward, the lowest price you’ll pay is $19.95.

It also means that the book is under development, so the pre-pub is a foregone conclusion. If you missed out, hop on the pre-pub because the price could go up again.

Moral of the story: Check out the Community Pricing page and see if anything piques your interest, because Community Pricing just may be the cheapest way to get access to that book that looks interesting. Perhaps you’d be interested in Driver’s Notes on Samuel (a worthy tome to consider).

Semeia and Logos Bible Software

The journal Semeia is one that I’ve heard all sorts of things about. It is currently a pre-pub that is under development, which means that we’ve raised enough interest to produce it.

It is (as of first publication of this blog article) priced at $29.95. Not bad for 91 issues of a journal.

Just the other day, I was reading an essay by Jeffrey T. Reed in the Handbook of Classical Rhetoric in the Hellenistic Period. The article was on the rhetoric of epistles (not necessarily NT epistles). And I noticed a footnote on pp. 172-173:

Cf. The epistolary definition of J.L. White, “The Greek Documentary Letter Tradition Third Century BC to Third Century AD”, Semeia 22 (1981), p. 91. Besides this primary function, the letter was used for a host of other purposes (e.g. letters of friendship, letters of praise and blame, letters of recommendation, letters of petition, and administrative letters).

Makes me want to read the article. When Semeia is available (hopefully soon!) in Logos Bible Software, I’ll be able to.

If you haven’t considered the Semeia pre-pub, but find stuff like the Theological Journal Library helpful, you may want to reconsider Semeia. It is cited in books, articles and essays, as this citation from Reed shows.

Greek Syntax: OpenText.org Word Groups

[Note: this is one in a series of posts on Greek syntax and Logos Bible Software. See the Greek category for a full listing. The immediately previous post is here.]

As mentioned in a previous post, the OpenText.org syntactic analysis consists of three primary levels of annotation:

  • Base Level Analysis (Word)
  • Word Group Analysis
  • Clause Analysis

This post will introduce you to the Word Group level of analysis. If this sort of stuff floats your boat, then read on.

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Greek Syntax, OpenText.org and Logos Bible Software

I introduced a series of posts on upcoming Greek Syntax tools last week. This is the second post (first post after the intro, you haven’t missed anything) in that series.

We have two different data sets that will be made available. If you’re at either the ETS or SBL conferences in November, you can see them demo’d. To keep my sanity (and yours) I’ll only discuss one data set at a time.

This first series of posts will discuss the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament, as implemented within Logos Bible Software.

Interested in utilizing syntax within your study of the New Testament? Read on!

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