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Homograph Indicators

Logos Bible Software Version 3.0 introduced the use of homograph indicators for searching biblical texts in ancient languages. More information on homograph indicators and how to use them can be found in the new web article entitled, appropriately, Homograph Indicators.

Hebrew (and Greek) KeyLinking in 3.0 (and 3.0a)

There is a new article on the website titled “Getting to the right definitions in Hebrew lexicons“. It describes the new LDLS version 3.0a enhancements to KeyLinking. While most of the article discusses Hebrew, there is information on Greek and other languages as well. The article Hebrew KeyLinking: A Strategy has also be rewritten to reflect how to get the most out of 3.0/3.0a. Enjoy!

A Trick With Bible Speed Search

One thing I use the Bible Speed Search feature for is to do quick searches of the New Testament for a Greek word, but display my hits in English.

Huh?

Yes, I type in a Greek lemma, but the results are provided in English with the proper English word highlighted. Rather than explain it all, I figured I’d put a quick video together to show you.

Note in the video that I use the F2 key to cycle between English, Hebrew and Greek keyboards (in that order) in order to type in English and Greek on the same line. I probably should’ve mentioned that, but it’s too late now.

Remember, you can do this with right-clicks too. See this previous entry for more details (with a video).

$6,650 in Shipping Charges?

Today’s guest blogger, Mark Van Dyke, is the newest member of the Logos marketing department.
In addition to saving shelf space and being easy to replace, electronic books also lower moving costs, an important incentive considering Logos software is used by missionaries around the world. Considering the large number of resources in Logos’ higher end libraries (Scholar’s Library, Scholar’s Library: Silver and Scholar’s Library: Gold) the amount of money that is saved during a move to another continent more than pays for the software itself.

For example, when a missionary family of four moves to Nigeria the cost of shipping their baggage alone is approximately $1,300! *

If a missionary owned the corresponding print versions of Logos book collections the substantial cost of moving would increase even more. Below is a listing of the cost of airmailing the print versions of three libraries from the United States to Papua New Guinea. The weights of each respective collection are shown in parentheses.

  • Scholar’s Library (936 lbs.) – $3,125.50
  • Scholar’s Library: Silver (1,073 lbs.) – $4,921.00
  • Scholar’s Library: Gold (1,450 lbs.) – $6,650.00

When shipping from the United States to Mongolia, Chad, Estonia or Jordan the average cost of sending print versions of Scholar’s: Gold resources averages just under $5,000!

If the financial burden were not enough one should also consider the hours of back-breaking labor required in packing and unpacking the hundreds of books in each collection. We at Logos recommend the method of buying the books on one DVD and throwing the disc in your carry-on luggage.

* Figure provided by Serving in Mission

Syntax Search Example: More Searching for Qualification


Once again, in the home group study, I ran across a phrase that caused me to ask a question. This time I’m in First Thessalonians 5.2 and the phrase is “day of the Lord”.

Earlier, I’d searched for “What other things qualify παρουσία?” (see post here). In this example, I use that same search as a starting point (sort of like a template) to search for “What other things qualify ἡμέρα (‘day’)?”

So this video (Flash, 11 megs, with sound) shows how to load the old query (which was saved) and modify it.

But as I was making the video, I had a flash of insight: I could use the OpenText.org semantic domain tagging to search for something similar but not constrain myself to vocabulary. I could search for where references to deity qualified words in the time domain. So I run through that aspect of modifying the search as well.

Revving Up the Publishing Juggernaut!

If you’ve been a Logos customer for very long, you’ve probably noticed that something has changed during the month of June. We used to post three or four new prepub titles per month, on average…this month we’ve already posted 11…with 4 new titles posted last week alone!

With some 2,000 books as part of the Continuum license, plus all the other contracts and books we have in the pipeline, we’ve had to ratchet things up a notch. A new guy in the marketing department, Zack Rock, is doing a great job of researching the books and crafting descriptions for the prepub page. He’s been cranking them out at a pace of 1-2 titles per day…so if you’ve fallen behind, here’s a quick update:

What’s New on the Prepub Page

Bible Study Helps


Books for Educators & Counselors

Greek Resources


Shipping Soon
This is your last chance to get a prepublication discount on the following titles. Once they ship, the price will go up so place your pre-order right away.

  • International Theological Commentary (27 vols)This commentary emphasizes the theology of the Old Testament, combining excellence in scholarship with relevant insight for today’s church. The Last Chance email already went out; we should be getting this back from replication soon, and will ship shortly after the Independence Day holiday.
  • Ryrie’s Basic Theology
    A clear and understandable systematic theology from a major figure in evangelicalism. Yes, this is the same guy who edited the widely-used Ryrie Study Bible. This title went through production very quickly. First posted to the prepub page May 25, it is due to ship around July 10.

Whew! That’s a lot and it’s just the new stuff…visit the prepub page to see a complete listing of what’s available at a prepub discount and take advantage of the opportunity to expand your library while saving some dough!

More Ways to Stay Abreast of the Juggernaut

  • NewsWire – email newsletter with the latest prepubs, sales, and more!
  • Prepub RSS Feed – keep up with the latest prepubs right in your feed reader, My Yahoo! homepage, Bloglines, etc.

Organizing an Outline with Syntax Graphs

Awhile back, I blogged on how syntax graphs aren’t just helpful when it comes to searching. They can be very helpful when reading through the text as well. And they can help one organize thoughts and approach when teaching or preaching on a passage.

A case in point is First Thessalonians 5.12-13. I dug into this passage in preparation for a home group Bible study. The OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament: Clause Analysis helped me to organize my thoughts on how this passage is structured, therefore it helped in thinking how this passage should be understood.

Continue Reading…

Syntax Search Example: What “Qualifies” another Word?

As folks who have followed these syntax search examples know, I’ve been in a home group Bible study that is going over First Thessalonians. This has served as the background for many of these syntax search examples.

In the process of doing this, I’ve noticed that I’ve begun to ask different questions of the text.

So when the study group was in 1Th 4.15, and when the word παρουσία occurs (yet again), I asked myself, “What other things qualify παρουσία?” Why did I ask that question? First, we need to define Qualifier:

Qualifier: A Qualifier is a modifier that in some way limits or constrains the scope of the word it modifies. Common examples of qualifiers are words in the genitive and dative case, and also negative particles functioning at the word group level.

Porter, S., O’Donnell, M. B., Reed, J. T., Tan, R., & OpenText.org. (2006; 2006). The OpenText.org
Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament Glossary
. Logos Research Systems, Inc.

So a Qualifier limits scope. In terms of παρουσία, which can be translated “return” or perhaps “coming”, when it occurs with a qualifier the qualifier limits the scope of the coming. Thus in phrases like “coming of the Lord”, the phrase “of the Lord” acts as the qualifier. It’s not just any “coming” or “return”, it is the return of the Lord. Just like in 1Th 4.15:

So when I ask the question “What other things qualify παρουσία?” I”m really asking “Are there any other similar sorts of ‘return’ or ‘coming’ phrases in the New Testament?” After all, to understand more how the word παρουσία is functioning here, it could help to see it operating in similar syntactic contexts — to see how παρουσία stands in relationship with other instances of words that modify it.

So I put together this video (Flash, 8.5 megs, with sound) to show how I constructed the query to find qualifiers of παρουσία.

After searching, ask yourself the question again: “What other things qualify παρουσία?” Now you have data to use when considering this question. As you evaluate the hits, you can ask further questions:

  • Are there any qualifiers that seem to repeat (hint: “his”, “of the Lord”, “of the son of man”, “of the Lord Jesus Christ”)?
  • What are the unique qualifiers (hint: 1Co 16.17; 2Co 7.6; Php 2.12, etc.)?
  • Is there anything that would allow one to say that the use of παρουσία in 1Th 4.15 is the same as or different from other syntactic usages?
  • If so, is 1Th 4.15 the use typical or non-typical?
  • How does the general understanding of the use of παρουσία with a qualifier in the New Testament affect how we look at the specific use of παρουσία in 1Th 4.15 (or does it)?

Here’s a link to the video: Flash, 8.5 megs, with sound

But note well: If you’d rather not go through the hoops of constructing the search as described in the video … just right-click the Greek word and run the Bible Word Study report. Check out the Grammatical Relationships section. One of the standard word relationships searched for is that of qualification. So this search is done automatically for you in the Bible Word Study report! No assembly required! And it even groups like qualifiers together, so you can see what repeats and what is unique just by looking at the result section.

Also note: A future post will show how to make this query even more generic and search for some things a little differently. So keep comin’ back!

More Thoughts on Shelf Space

Yesterday’s post about freeing up shelf space by donating books got me thinking about a newsgroup post I read some time back.

The newsgroup post was from a Logos user who wanted to calculate the number of linear feet that his electronic library would consume if it were a print library instead. The number he came up with was 220.5 linear feet to shelve the 1,544 volumes in his Libronix Digital Library System.

How did he come up with this number?

A standard calculation for building a library estimates 8 volumes per foot of shelf space. Reference books tend to be larger, so they are calculated at 5-7 volumes per foot. Since Logos Bible Software collections are a mix of reference and non-reference, this user chose a conservative 7 volumes per foot. 1,544 / 7 = 220.57

Just for fun, how many shelf feet of books are in a couple of our top-end collections?

Another way to think about the numbers: Scholar’s Library: Gold would fill the better part of six 3-foot wide shelving units with 5 shelves per unit. Placed along a wall end-to-end, those shelving units would take up more than 18 feet of wall space!

Any way you look at it, that’s a lot of books! Something for which to be grateful next time you put them all in your laptop bag to hop a plane or when you pack up to move…

And for something less frivolous, check out http://www.lovepackages.org, a non-profit organization that sends Christian books and other printed materials to countries like India and Nigeria where a significant percentage of the population reads English. Thanks to blog reader and Logos user Thomas Black for the tip!

Clearing Off Shelf Space

So you upgraded to Scholar’s Library: Gold…or just bought Scholar’s Library…and now you have a new problem: What to do with all those print books gathering dust on your shelves?

A) You could archive them all, just in case you ever need them again. (Warning: as your bookshelves begin to extend out of your study, down the hallway, and into the “spare” room, your long-suffering spouse may take issue with this policy.)B) You could sell the books to finance future purchases of electronic volumes to add to your library. Or,C) You could give them away to a deserving person who would use them in study and ministry.

If C) sounds like a good option, you might want to take advantage of an opportunity to give some of your quality books to students and professors at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (NOBTS). Many personal libraries at the school were destroyed in the flooding caused by Hurricane Katrina, but an effort is underway to replace the lost books.

This week’s Preaching Now newsletter describes an effort coordinated by Jerry Barlow, the dean of graduate studies at NOBTS, to replace the print libraries of students and profs at the school.
If you have quality books in the areas of preaching, pastoral care, Old Testament or New Testament, you can box them up and ship them to:

Preaching Books Project
c/o Dr. Jerry Barlow
New Orleans Baptist Seminary
3939 Gentilly Blvd.
New Orleans, LA 70126

It sounds like a great way to ensure that those old friends of yours will continue to be loved and appreciated instead of gathering dust and being neglected. It might also be fun to surprise your spouse with a box of books leaving the house for once rather than arriving!