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Bible Study Magazine for $2.95

We have several subscription options available for Bible Study Magazine. A one-year subscription is available for pre-order for only $14.95. If you want to order multiple copies of each issue to share with your family, friends, colleagues, study group, etc., you can purchase in quantities of 5, 25, or 100 at substantial discounts.

For those of you who have been hesitant to pre-order an entire year’s worth of issues, we’ve added the option to buy one copy of the first issue only for a mere $2.95. That’s 40% off the list price and covers the cost of shipping to addresses in the continental US (additional charges apply for other addresses). This will give you a chance to check it out without committing to a full year.

If you like what you see—and we’re confident that you will—you’ll be able to subscribe for a full year for $24.95. Of course, if you order the one-year subscription now, you’ll be able to get the Pre-Pub price of $14.95.

Amplified Bible Now Available for Download

Users have asked often about the Amplified Bible, but we’ve never been able to offer it as an individual download—until now. As of last Friday, you can purchase the Amplified Bible as a standalone product.

For those of you not familiar with the Amplified Bible, it’s distinguishing feature is how it gives alternate ways to translate words and phrase and explanatory notes right in the text in parentheses and brackets.

Compare 1 John 1:9 in the Amplified Bible to the ESV:

ESV

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Amplified Bible

If we [freely] admit that we have sinned and confess our sins, He is faithful and just (true to His own nature and promises) and will forgive our sins [dismiss our lawlessness] and [continuously] cleanse us from all unrighteousness [everything not in conformity to His will in purpose, thought, and action].

For a limited time, we’re offering a special 50% discount to our blog readers. Use coupon code AMPLIFIED during checkout, and we’ll cut the price in half. The coupon code is valid through July 31, 2008, so don’t miss out.

That’s One Big Commentary on Hebrews

Back in March we announced that the Works of John Owen (17 Vols.) had finally been put on Pre-Pub. As we expected, it’s generated more than enough interest to send it into production. The digitization process is moving along nicely, even though we did have some lacunae in our copy of volume 17. (Volume 17, which is entitled Theologoumena Pantodapa, is an entirely Latin volume that was left out of the Banner of Truth reprint edition. It’s nearly impossible to find even in libraries, but we were finally able to borrow a copy from Westminster Seminary California.)

Though there was much rejoicing when we announced Owen’s 17-volume set, one question came repeatedly, “What about Owen’s massive Hebrews commentary?” Blog post comments, newsgroup postings, and emails all cried out for Owen’s detailed exposition of Hebrews.

I was happy to see the works of John Owen on Pre-Pub but my joy soon turned to disappointment. What happened to Owen’s work on Hebrews (7 volumes)? Would you consider having Owen’s Hebrews in the Logos electronic format even if it is a standalone collection? Surely it can’t be right not having Hebrews to complete the Owen’s collection. Please give due consideration to my request & do all you can to have Owen’s Hebrews in Logos.

. . .

Owen’s 7 vol. commentary on Hebrews is great. I have the books and have found them very useful.  He is exhaustive, approaching the text from many angles.

. . .

Thank you for doing this. I’ve been hoping for Owen for some time. I’m certain that this should be a big hit, and I am excited for Hebrews.

. . .

I am EATING UP all the Puritan materials that have gone Pre-Pub the last few months. I’ve got $1,400 worth of Pre-Pubs right now. Go Logos! Still looking forward to Owen’s Hebrews commentary, and hopefully John Gill’s commentary, more puritan works, etc.

In my original blog post I said, “If there is enough interest in Owen’s works, we’ll eventually put his 7-volume Hebrews commentary up on Pre-Pub as well.”

We’re glad to report that you can now place your pre-order for Owen’s 7-volume, 4,000-page, 2,000,000-word Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Learning Greek Just Got a Little Easier

As many Bible college and seminary students (and teachers!) can attest, learning Greek can be a challenging task. “It’s Greek to me!” hasn’t become a well-known expression without good reason.

One of our goals here at Logos is to facilitate learning and using the original languages. We offer a huge number of Hebrew and Greek resources. But as helpful and essential as grammars are for learning Greek, reading books isn’t enough for many students. They need to hear it and speak it to get it to stick.

We introduced our Greek Pronunciation Addin a couple of years ago (a Hebrew Pronunciation Addin is on Pre-Pub). It’s included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and is also available for individual sale. The addin allows students to reinforce standard pronunciations, but only for lemmas (the dictionary form) and only one word at a time.

Learning the proper pronunciation for inflected forms involves a little more guesswork, especially for students learning Greek on their own without the help of an instructor.

With the new Greek Audio Bible, you can now hear Professor John Schwandt read any passage in the Greek New Testament. Simply enter a passage, and click play. The blue arrow will move with the audio to help you follow along in your Greek New Testament. If the normal reading speed is too fast, you can adjust it to slow or slower.

This is sure to be a helpful tool for beginner and intermediate Greek students.

Find out more at the product page, or see it in action in this video demonstration.

Why a Print Magazine?

I believe in electronic publishing.

For ease of use, searchability, and fast distribution, there’s nothing better than pure data. So why is Logos Bible Software launching Bible Study Magazine as a paper product? To reach even more people with the excitement and encouragement of Bible study.

Paper isn’t dead. And while more and more people are discovering that it’s an awkward format for a ten volume Greek lexicon, it still remains a very attractive, portable, friendly, accessible, and bathroom-compatible format for browsing.

When I use electronic media, I’m on a mission to search and retrieve answers. And it’s great—I get answers quickly. But when I pick up a magazine, I find myself exposed to new information and new ideas. The layout and format draw me into stories I would never have searched for. I use my keyboard to look things up; magazines expand the world of things I want to know about.

The world of Bible study is bigger than looking up verses or doing a word study. Our goal with Bible Study Magazine is to expand your horizons. We want to introduce both the person in the pulpit and in the pew to topics, ideas, and tools for better Bible study.

For searching the writings of the Apostolic Fathers, there’s no better tool than Logos Bible Software. To introduce someone who’s never thought of them to the Fathers and explain how their writings can illuminate our Bible study and encourage us in our faith? That’s a job for Bible Study Magazine.

For the digerati among us who’ve given up on print and read everything from a screen, we’ll eventually have the magazine content available electronically for Logos Bible Software. In the meantime, though, we hope to use the power of print to reach a new and larger audience whose horizons we can expand and whose curiosity we can pique.

I know you are interested in Bible study, and I am confident you’ll find Bible Study Magazine well worth the subscription price. But I think an even better investment is to take a bundle subscription for your church or small group. We all know people who know they should spend more time in the Word, but who haven’t experienced the joy of digging deeper. Bible Study Magazine is designed to engage their interest, to make it easy to get started, and to expose them to the excitement of discovery in and around God’s Word.

We can make it as easy as picking up a magazine.

Buy 2, Get 14 Free!

Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on the Gospels and Acts (16 Vols.)Time is running out for the Library of NT Studies: JSNTS on the Gospels and Acts (16 Vols.) collection. It’s set to ship in just another day or two. At $299.95, it’s a steal. Let me tell you why.

You would spend an average of $305.28 to pick up any two of these titles in print. Yes, you read that correctly. Any two.

Here are the 16 volumes with Amazon’s latest prices:

  • $72.00 The Gospel of Matthew in Its Roman Imperial Context
  • $84.00 The Date of Mark’s Gospel: Insights from the Law in Earliest Christianity
  • $216.00 Mark’s Gospel—Prior or Posterior?: A Reappraisal of the Phenomenon of Order
  • $168.00 Word and Glory: On the Exegetical and Theological Background of John’s Prologue
  • $162.00 The Unity of the Farewell Discourse: The Literary Integrity of John 13:31-16:33
  • $180.00 The Lazarus Story within the Johannine Tradition
  • $180.00 Echoes of a Prophet: The Use of Ezekiel in the Gospel of John and in Literature of the Second Temple Period
  • $144.00 The Temple of Jesus’ Body: The Temple Theme in the Gospel of John
  • $64.80 Dynamic Reading of the Holy Spirit in Luke-Acts
  • $157.50 The Davidic Messiah in Luke-Acts: The Promise and Its Fulfillment in Lukan Christology
  • $168.00 The Finger of God and Pneumatology in Luke-Acts
  • $168.00 Echoes of Scripture in Luke-Acts: Telling the History of God’s People Intertextually
  • $180.00 Jerusalem and the Early Jesus Movement: The Q Community’s Attitude toward the Temple
  • $144.00 Apocalypticism, Anti-Semitism and the Historical Jesus: Subtexts in Criticism
  • $192.00 The Jewish Context of Jesus’ Miracles
  • $162.00 Historiography and Hermeneutics in Jesus Studies: An Examination of the Work of John Dominic Crossan and Ben F. Meyer

Most people probably wouldn’t spend the $2442.30 to pick up all 16 volumes in print. I know I wouldn’t. But are there any two books in this list that you think you might want to buy at some point? If so, why not buy the Logos collection instead? We’ll throw in the other 14 volumes for free!

166 Volumes of Greek Goodness!

Jacques Paul Migne’s Patrologia Graeca is a massive series of 166 print volumes of Greek writings from the 1st century through the 15th century. We’ve been asked many times if we’d consider making this indispensable set available, and we’re finally ready to give it a shot.

As you can imagine, digitizing 166 volumes of small Greek and Latin text—each volume ranging anywhere from 500 to 1,500 pages—is no small undertaking. Print sets are next to impossible to obtain. When we last looked into getting one, the price tag was in the $40,000 range!

Instead of trying to Pre-Pub the whole thing at once and putting it out of the range of just about everyone of our users, we’re going to release it in chunks. This will make it more affordable for you, allow you to pick and choose the sections you want, and make it so you don’t have to wait a decade for the completed project!

The first chunk, volumes 1-18 (20 print volumes), covers the pre-Nicaean period and features the writings of Clement of Rome, Ignatius of Antioch, Polycarp, Melito of Sardis, Papias, Justin Martyr, Tatian, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Origen, and dozens of others.

Why Would You Want It?

That’s the million dollar question—actually, the $400 question. Allow me to take a stab at some reasons that you should consider placing your pre-order.

Greek Studies

Comparative Grammar

The Greek New Testament is a fairly small corpus of literature. There are hundreds of words, forms, and grammatical structures that occur only once in the whole GNT making it difficult to adequately evaluate them. Being able to compare NT usage—vocabulary, morphology, and syntax—to other Greek writings like the LXX, OT Pseudepigrapha, Josephus, Philo, the Apostolic Fathers, etc. is incredibly valuable. But even these bodies of literature don’t address all of the questions grammarians and exegetes have. Significantly broadening the corpus of Greek texts that can be compared to the Greek NT is a major boon to biblical Greek studies.

Textual Criticism

In many cases the writings of the church fathers shed light on which readings of the biblical texts are earlier and more likely to be original. If you’ve looked at a Greek New Testament apparatus, you’ll see references to the fathers on nearly every page. Being able to look up these references will allow textual critics to get one step closer to the sources—and even make advancements in the field of textual criticism.

Church History

Reading the Original

Have you ever been reading somewhere in Schaff’s ECF and wanted to see the underlying Greek behind the English? I know I have. Have you ever wished you could follow references to the Father’s in footnotes in commentaries and other academic literature? With our digital edition of Patrologia Graeca, this kind of study will finally be easily accessible.

Many people don’t realize that Philip Schaff’s 38-volume Early Church Fathers represents only a fraction of the writings of the church fathers. If you want to read some of the church fathers, reading them in Greek or Latin is the only option. Serious students of the history of the formative years of the church cannot afford to ignore this massive collection of writings.

History of Interpretation

Since Scripture references will be tagged, you’ll be able to evaluate all of the places where a certain passage of Scripture is discussed—a crucial part of in-depth study on difficult passages. Want to find out how the fathers handled baptism for the dead in 1 Cor 15:29? No problem. Add your Patrologia Graeca collection to your Passage Guide, use the Reference Browser, or run a search like bible = "1 Cor 15:29".

Convinced yet? Read more or place your order at the Pre-Pub page.

Where Are the Textual Apparatuses?

Textual apparatuses (a.k.a. critical apparatuses) are essential tools for serious exegesis. They list alternate readings, the texts that contain those readings, and often the level of certainty the editors had in choosing the reading they went with.

Students of the biblical languages will notice, though, that the main editions of the Hebrew OT (Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia) and the Greek NT (NA27 and UBS4) that come with our upper-end base packages lack the corresponding textual apparatuses. Without the apparatuses, you still need to reference your print volumes to check for variant readings. Are you stuck using part digital and part print for your study of the Hebrew and Greek texts?

There are two standard textual critical tools included in the Original Languages Library and Scholar’s Library: Gold.

If you don’t own either of these base packages, you can either upgrade or buy the resources individually.

There are several other critical apparatuses available as add-on resources.

Apparatuses for the Hebrew Old Testament

  • BHS Apparatus Criticus
  • BHQ Apparatus Criticus (partial)

Both of these are included in SESB 2 and not available for individual sale. The BHS apparatus is also included in the Logos edition of SESB 1.

Apparatuses for the Greek New Testament

  • NA27 Apparatus Criticus
  • UBS4 Apparatus (not a separate resource)
  • Majority Text Apparatus (includes the Majority Text GNT)

The NA27 apparatus is part of SESB 2 and the Logos edition of SESB 1. The UBS4 apparatus is available only in SESB 2. The Majority Text apparatus is bundled with the GNT.

It should be clear by now that if you really want to build the critical apparatuses section of your digital library, SESB 2 is a must.

For more on apparatuses and resources relating to textual criticism see the Critical Apparatuses section of the Product Guide for Greek Bible Texts & Tools. You’ll also want to check out the article “Critical Apparatuses: What and Why.”

Bring on the Commentaries!

NA27 vs. UBS4: What’re the Differences?

Have you ever wondered what the differences are between the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, 27th ed. (NA27) and the United Bible Societies Greek New Testament, 4th ed. (UBS4) or between the various Greek New Testaments available for Libronix? Wonder no more. Rick Brannan has done extensive comparative analysis between these two popular editions of the Greek New Testament and gives you all of the details in this very informative article “NA27 vs. UBS4 (Greek New Testaments).” He also helpfully compares our various Greek New Testament texts.

I turned to Rick on a question a while back regarding a difference between the NA27 and UBS4 and quickly learned that Rick really knows his stuff on this. I think Rick’s article would make excellent required reading for Greek students (and professors!).

Go give it a read, and be sure to bookmark it for future reference.