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Creating a Resource Update Toolbar Button

In Wednesday’s blog post I talked about the Resource Auto Update script and how it is important that you run it regularly to make sure that you have the most up-to-date version of your resource files.

I mentioned how you could bookmark the link in your browser, but some of you may prefer to have the link right in Libronix. So I’ve created a quick video demo that shows you how to create a resource update toolbar button.

If you don’t want to watch the video but just want the steps, here they are:

  1. Open Libronix.
  2. Right click in the toolbar area and click “Customize.”
  3. Click “New” to create a new toolbar. (You can also add the button to a pre-existing custom toolbar.)
  4. Leave the “Category” as “Special,” and click on “Go To (Internet Application).”
  5. Click “Add,” give the toolbar a name like “Resource Update,” and then click on “Details.”
  6. (Optional: Give the button a name, select a style and icon, and assign a shortcut key.)
  7. Paste the following link into the “Internet Address” box: http://www.logos.com/media/update/ResourceAutoUpdate.lbxupd.
  8. Click “OK,” “OK,” and “Close.”
  9. Click your new button (or use your shortcut key) to run the Resource Auto Update.

Or just download the toolbar, put it in your My Documents\Libronix DLS\CustomToolbars folder, and enable it from the right-click menu by clicking in the toolbar area and selecting “Resource Update.”

Updating Your Resources

We strive to produce very high quality digital books, but typos do creep in sometimes. With the help of our attentive users and our typo reporting tool (Help > Report Typo), our electronic text development department is often able to get these typos fixed and new files added to our FTP site. You’ll find them at ftp://ftp.logos.com/lbxbooks/.

Why Should You Update?

Updating your resources is good for you and us. It gives you more accurate resources with better functionality, and it also helps to eliminate typo reports on outdated resources.

How Do You Updated?

The simplest way to get the latest files for your books is to run the Resource Auto Update script: http://www.logos.com/media/update/ResourceAutoUpdate.lbxupd. Simply click this link and choose “Open” if your browser gives you an option.

Libronix Update will scan the resources on your hard drive and then give you a list of resources that are outdated.

You could check the box next to Resources to download all of the updates, but if this is your first time running the Resource Auto Update script (or you haven’t run it in a while), you might want to look at the “Total Download” size before you hit “Update.”

My update is 159.30 MB, and since I have a very fast connection here at work, this won’t take long at all. But if you’re on a slower DSL or dial up connection, this could take several hours. If you’re uncertain of your connection speed or how long it might take, the best approach would be to download them a handful at a time so you can gauge how long it’s going to take. Check half a dozen boxes and try a smaller download first. Then repeat the process until you’re done with all of them. (Note: you’ll need to start Libronix in between each session or else you’ll be prompted to download the same resources you just download.)

When it completes the download, you’ll be prompted to close Libronix (if it was opened). After it finishes, you can start Libronix and begin using your newly updated books.

Bookmark This!

We recommend that you run this at least once a month. To remember this link for later, just right-click on it and select “Add to Favorites” (Internet Explorer) or “Bookmark This Link” (Firefox). You’ll also find this link at the bottom of this page: http://www.logos.com/support/download/30bupdate, which is accessible from the Support section of our website (Support > Download the Latest Version > Update).

Books, Books, and More Books!

I’m a book lover. While I prefer the digital kind, I still love the print ones too. Whenever I visit another book lover’s home, my eyes are almost irresistibly drawn to his bookshelves.

As you can imagine, we have thousands of print books around the office. My wife works over in the Electronic Text Development department, and I’m always peeking at the bookshelves to see what’s new when I go over to meet her for lunch.

In the last week or two, we’ve had several big shipments of books that have really gotten me excited. The shipments weren’t quite as big as the ones we got from T&T Clark a couple of years ago, but they contained some excellent books that I know many of you will be as thrilled about as I am. I wish I could tell you more, but I don’t want to ruin the surprise.

You have probably noticed that it’s been fairly quiet on the Pre-Pub page over the last couple of weeks, but that’s about to change very soon. Stay tuned!

Sneak Peek Inside Bible Study Magazine

Our team is hard at work putting the finishing touches on the inaugural issue of Bible Study Magazine.

To whet your appetite for what’s to come, we thought we’d share some excerpts from the first issue.

“Letter from the Editor” by Michael Heiser

Welcome to our inaugural issue! We know that you will be as excited about Bible Study Magazine as we are.

Bible Study Magazine will enhance your study of God’s word in a variety of ways, suggesting methods of Bible study and offering tips on Bible study tools. It includes advice and encouragement from pastors, teachers, and scholars on Bible study. Interesting and challenging content about the Bible and the ancient biblical world will take your Bible study to a completely new level.

In this first issue, we explore how apologist Josh McDowell studies the Scriptures; the Great Isaiah Scroll (one of the Dead Sea Scrolls) provides insights into how we got the Bible; and choosing a Bible translation.

That might sound like a lot to cover, but we’re just getting started. Whether you’re a pastor, a seasoned Bible student, or someone new to studying God’s Word, Bible Study Magazine is for you.

Enjoy the magazine!

“How Bible Study Saved My Marriage and Changed My Life” by Christy Tennant

When David Lawson became a Christian, his wife, B.J., was out of town visiting a relative. Their marriage was in serious trouble, so David decided to visit a church, where he gave his life to Christ.

“I didn’t know what being a Christian was all about,” says Lawson. “I just felt this incredible question burning in my heart: ‘What do I do now that I’m a Christian?’”

Right at the beginning of his new faith journey, David says there were two things he knew for sure. First, even though his marriage was on the rocks, a divorce was out of the question. And second, having come to faith in Christ under the preaching of a Bible-saturated church, he thought, “If God wrote the Bible, I should probably read it!”

“When I Open the Gospels: An Interview with Dr. Mark Goodacre”

BSM: What are the Synoptic Gospels and what does the term “synoptic” mean?

Goodacre: The Synoptic Gospels are the first three Gospels: Matthew, Mark, and Luke. John is distinguished from the first three because it has a different structure, order, and approach. While there are extensive verbatim (word for word) agreements between the Synoptic Gospels, there are very few between the Synoptics and John. The Synoptic Gospels can be viewed together in three columns in what is called a “Synopsis” and that is the meaning of the term “Synoptic,” “view together.”

“Facing Today with the Book of Hebrews” by John D. Barry

Deeply rooted in the sermon delivered to the Hebrews is a sense of urgency. The same sense of urgency exists today—in a time of war, lack of community and spiritual depravity. Our study of the book will help us understand the pressing need of a previous generation and answer the cry of our own. Through understanding how God equipped ancient believers, we will understand how God can outfit us. Through these ancient texts, we will find modern answers.

When we open the book of Hebrews, we discover a community of Christians living in a time of trial, a community not so different from yours or mine. They, like us, are struggling to understand God in the midst of suffering. In this regard, the message of the book is our message—their story is our story.

You can still pre-order Bible Study Magazine at our discounted Pre-Pub price. Visit http://www.logos.com/biblestudymagazine to see the subscription options and all the other details.

Oldie But Goodie

The Expositor's Greek Testament (5 Vols.)Sometimes older works get replaced by newer ones and have little enduring value—assuming one has access to the newer works. Others stand the test of time. Such is the case with The Expositor’s Greek Testament (EGT), which was later reprinted and retitled as The Expositor’s Greek New Testament (EGNT), though most still refer to it without the New.

Even though it is more than a century old, many still think it belongs in the libraries of students of Scripture. The Master’s Seminary includes it with an asterisk in their “850 Books for Biblical Expositors.”

World-renown New Testament scholar D. A. Carson, who doesn’t hesitate to say when he thinks that a book has little value, thinks it unfortunate that this set is out of print and maintains that even though dated, “the five volumes of the old Expositor’s Greek New Testament are still worth owning and reading, along with more recent works” (New Testament Commentary Survey, 5th ed., 22, 64).

A search in Libronix for “Expositor’s Greek Testament” OR “Expositor’s Greek New Testament” returns more than 1,600 hits in many Bible and theological dictionaries and encyclopedias, hundreds of the theological journals, and a host of New Testament commentaries.

The EGT, which was edited by William Robertson Nicoll, covers in 3,342 pages the entire New Testament. It features contributions from A. B. Bruce (Synoptic Gospels), Marcus Dods (John and Hebrews), R. J. Knowling (Acts), James Denney (Romans), G. G. Findlay (1 Corinthians), J. H. Bernard (2 Corinthians), Frederic Rendall (Galatians), S. D. F. Salmond (Ephesians), H. A. A. Kennedy (Philippians), A. S. Peake (Colossians), James Moffatt (Thessalonians and Revelation), J. D. White (Timothy and Titus), W. E. Oesterley (Philemon and James), J. H. A. Hart (1 Peter), R. H. Strachan (2 Peter), David Smith (John’s Letters), and J. B. Mayor (Jude).

Place your pre-order to help this oldie but goodie make it back into the libraries of biblical expositors.

You may also want to check out The Expositor’s Bible, also edited by William Robertson Nicoll.

Bible Study Magazine for $2.95

We have several subscription options available for Bible Study Magazine. A one-year subscription is available for pre-order for only $14.95. If you want to order multiple copies of each issue to share with your family, friends, colleagues, study group, etc., you can purchase in quantities of 5, 25, or 100 at substantial discounts.

For those of you who have been hesitant to pre-order an entire year’s worth of issues, we’ve added the option to buy one copy of the first issue only for a mere $2.95. That’s 40% off the list price and covers the cost of shipping to addresses in the continental US (additional charges apply for other addresses). This will give you a chance to check it out without committing to a full year.

If you like what you see—and we’re confident that you will—you’ll be able to subscribe for a full year for $24.95. Of course, if you order the one-year subscription now, you’ll be able to get the Pre-Pub price of $14.95.

Amplified Bible Now Available for Download

Users have asked often about the Amplified Bible, but we’ve never been able to offer it as an individual download—until now. As of last Friday, you can purchase the Amplified Bible as a standalone product.

For those of you not familiar with the Amplified Bible, it’s distinguishing feature is how it gives alternate ways to translate words and phrase and explanatory notes right in the text in parentheses and brackets.

Compare 1 John 1:9 in the Amplified Bible to the ESV:

ESV

If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

Amplified Bible

If we [freely] admit that we have sinned and confess our sins, He is faithful and just (true to His own nature and promises) and will forgive our sins [dismiss our lawlessness] and [continuously] cleanse us from all unrighteousness [everything not in conformity to His will in purpose, thought, and action].

For a limited time, we’re offering a special 50% discount to our blog readers. Use coupon code AMPLIFIED during checkout, and we’ll cut the price in half. The coupon code is valid through July 31, 2008, so don’t miss out.

That’s One Big Commentary on Hebrews

Back in March we announced that the Works of John Owen (17 Vols.) had finally been put on Pre-Pub. As we expected, it’s generated more than enough interest to send it into production. The digitization process is moving along nicely, even though we did have some lacunae in our copy of volume 17. (Volume 17, which is entitled Theologoumena Pantodapa, is an entirely Latin volume that was left out of the Banner of Truth reprint edition. It’s nearly impossible to find even in libraries, but we were finally able to borrow a copy from Westminster Seminary California.)

Though there was much rejoicing when we announced Owen’s 17-volume set, one question came repeatedly, “What about Owen’s massive Hebrews commentary?” Blog post comments, newsgroup postings, and emails all cried out for Owen’s detailed exposition of Hebrews.

I was happy to see the works of John Owen on Pre-Pub but my joy soon turned to disappointment. What happened to Owen’s work on Hebrews (7 volumes)? Would you consider having Owen’s Hebrews in the Logos electronic format even if it is a standalone collection? Surely it can’t be right not having Hebrews to complete the Owen’s collection. Please give due consideration to my request & do all you can to have Owen’s Hebrews in Logos.

. . .

Owen’s 7 vol. commentary on Hebrews is great. I have the books and have found them very useful.  He is exhaustive, approaching the text from many angles.

. . .

Thank you for doing this. I’ve been hoping for Owen for some time. I’m certain that this should be a big hit, and I am excited for Hebrews.

. . .

I am EATING UP all the Puritan materials that have gone Pre-Pub the last few months. I’ve got $1,400 worth of Pre-Pubs right now. Go Logos! Still looking forward to Owen’s Hebrews commentary, and hopefully John Gill’s commentary, more puritan works, etc.

In my original blog post I said, “If there is enough interest in Owen’s works, we’ll eventually put his 7-volume Hebrews commentary up on Pre-Pub as well.”

We’re glad to report that you can now place your pre-order for Owen’s 7-volume, 4,000-page, 2,000,000-word Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews.

Learning Greek Just Got a Little Easier

As many Bible college and seminary students (and teachers!) can attest, learning Greek can be a challenging task. “It’s Greek to me!” hasn’t become a well-known expression without good reason.

One of our goals here at Logos is to facilitate learning and using the original languages. We offer a huge number of Hebrew and Greek resources. But as helpful and essential as grammars are for learning Greek, reading books isn’t enough for many students. They need to hear it and speak it to get it to stick.

We introduced our Greek Pronunciation Addin a couple of years ago (a Hebrew Pronunciation Addin is on Pre-Pub). It’s included in Scholar’s, Silver, and Gold and is also available for individual sale. The addin allows students to reinforce standard pronunciations, but only for lemmas (the dictionary form) and only one word at a time.

Learning the proper pronunciation for inflected forms involves a little more guesswork, especially for students learning Greek on their own without the help of an instructor.

With the new Greek Audio Bible, you can now hear Professor John Schwandt read any passage in the Greek New Testament. Simply enter a passage, and click play. The blue arrow will move with the audio to help you follow along in your Greek New Testament. If the normal reading speed is too fast, you can adjust it to slow or slower.

This is sure to be a helpful tool for beginner and intermediate Greek students.

Find out more at the product page, or see it in action in this video demonstration.

Why a Print Magazine?

I believe in electronic publishing.

For ease of use, searchability, and fast distribution, there’s nothing better than pure data. So why is Logos Bible Software launching Bible Study Magazine as a paper product? To reach even more people with the excitement and encouragement of Bible study.

Paper isn’t dead. And while more and more people are discovering that it’s an awkward format for a ten volume Greek lexicon, it still remains a very attractive, portable, friendly, accessible, and bathroom-compatible format for browsing.

When I use electronic media, I’m on a mission to search and retrieve answers. And it’s great—I get answers quickly. But when I pick up a magazine, I find myself exposed to new information and new ideas. The layout and format draw me into stories I would never have searched for. I use my keyboard to look things up; magazines expand the world of things I want to know about.

The world of Bible study is bigger than looking up verses or doing a word study. Our goal with Bible Study Magazine is to expand your horizons. We want to introduce both the person in the pulpit and in the pew to topics, ideas, and tools for better Bible study.

For searching the writings of the Apostolic Fathers, there’s no better tool than Logos Bible Software. To introduce someone who’s never thought of them to the Fathers and explain how their writings can illuminate our Bible study and encourage us in our faith? That’s a job for Bible Study Magazine.

For the digerati among us who’ve given up on print and read everything from a screen, we’ll eventually have the magazine content available electronically for Logos Bible Software. In the meantime, though, we hope to use the power of print to reach a new and larger audience whose horizons we can expand and whose curiosity we can pique.

I know you are interested in Bible study, and I am confident you’ll find Bible Study Magazine well worth the subscription price. But I think an even better investment is to take a bundle subscription for your church or small group. We all know people who know they should spend more time in the Word, but who haven’t experienced the joy of digging deeper. Bible Study Magazine is designed to engage their interest, to make it easy to get started, and to expose them to the excitement of discovery in and around God’s Word.

We can make it as easy as picking up a magazine.