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Of the Making of Books (Part 7)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

Liturgical Press
One of our earliest publishing partnerships was with Liturgical Press, the publishing arm of St. John’s Abbey and University, a Benedictine monastery and college in central Minnesota.

In 1997, Liturgical published an electronic edition of the Vatican II Papers. This was followed in 1999 by The Rule of St. Benedict Library, an ambitious project that includes numerous primary and secondary sources relating to Benedictine study. This product is a significant beneficiary of electronic technology, as the various translations of and commentaries on the Rule are able to be scrolled in parallel and set as preferred targets for keylinking.

In February of 2001, Liturgical released a set of reference titles in a collection they titled The Collegeville Catholic Reference Library, which was updated in August of 2002 to the Libronix Digital Library System. The set includes the most popular reference works from Liturgical Press: The Collegeville Bible Commentary, The New Dictionary of Sacramental Worship, The New Dictionary of Catholic Spirituality, The New Dictionary of Catholic Social Thought, The New Dictionary of Theology, and Consecrated Phrases: A Latin Theological Dictionary.

While they are clearly a progressive organization, the folks at St. John’s haven’t lost sight of their roots. As evidence, take a moment to appreciate one of their newest and most ambitious print projects, The Saint John’s Bible. “The first handwritten, illuminated Bible commissioned since the printing press was invented five centuries ago.”

SJBIB

Next: Caribe-Betania Editores

Of the Making of Books (Part 6)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.

(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)

Standard Publishing
One of the most rewarding aspects of our work at Logos is when we see our technology helping people to be more consistent and fruitful in their daily study of the Bible. When we partner with a publisher who values this as much as we do, great things can happen. Such is the case with Standard Publishing.

Beginning in the fall of 2001, Standard began issuing an electronic edition of their annual Standard Lesson Commentary using our technology. As you can see from the cover, the CD-ROM was considered a “bonus” and I’m sure both companies wondered just how many of the loyal purchasers of the print edition would actually use the CD-ROM.

SLC0102

In those days, we didn’t really have any way to track that statistic, but Standard seemed pleased enough with the reaction to continue the following year. Because the 2002–2003 edition was based on the Libronix Digital Library System, we were able to gather some information about the number of people who made the effort to take the CD out of the back of the book, load it onto their computer and complete the activation process.

Were we ever surprised. Thousands of people activated the software and gladly embraced the electronic format. The following year, the numbers were nearly identical.

SLC0203 SLC0304

For the 2004–2005 edition, Standard took a big step and decided to launch an electronic-only product. The product was named The Standard Lesson eCommentary and included a small library of reference books as well.

If one of your New Year’s Resolutions is to be more consistent in your daily Bible study, it’s not too late to pick up the 2005–2006 Standard Lesson eCommentary and get started. And don’t worry. Planning for the 2006–2007 edition has already begun!

Next: Liturgical Press

Camp Logos Cruise

Avast, ye scurvy dogs, are ye ready to set sail fer Alaska with “Cap’n Moe” and the Camp Logos crew?

OK, I don’t think it’s going to be a pirate themed event. But still, what could be better than hanging out with other Logos aficionados aboard the Sun Princess while eating great food, seeing some seriously impressive sights, and sharpening your Bible software skills?

The 7-day cruise leaves from Seattle, Washington, on July 23, 2006, and follows the beautiful Inside Passage to Alaska with 5 ports of call along the way. You will see Victoria, Ketchikan, the Tracy Arm Fjord, Juneau, and Skagway.

You’ll also benefit from a number of focused training sessions with Morris Proctor, certified trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris will lead group and individual sessions to take your Logos-assisted Bible study to the next level and ensure that you’re using the tool with optimal efficiency. And, of course, spending time with other users will be just plain fun.

Get the complete details and sign up for the cruise at the Morris Proctor Seminars website. The registration deadline is coming up soon, so don’t wait.

Logos Newsgroups Back Up

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Why a Vast Electronic Library is a Good Thing

Our customers need no convincing. A hard drive full of electronic reference books trumps a stack of dead trees, no question. But from time to time, I read comments from a reviewer or blogger who seems to doubt the utility or legitimacy of amassing a large electronic library.

Stories like the following testimonial from a pastor in Hong Kong, however, only confirm my deep belief in the soundness of our vision to digitize thousands upon thousands of Bible reference titles.
I’ll let the story speak for itself…

Brothers and Sisters in Christ,

I am a Filipino pastor sent by God to Hong Kong to help minister to Filipino domestic helpers in this city. There are about 160,000 Filipinos in this city.

I preach and teach almost everyday except on Monday. The way the church is set up is quite different from other churches. We don’t schedule our church services. We open the church whenever the believers could come and met. If they are out on a Tuesday morning, then we have a church meeting on Tuesday morning. If it is Thursday evening, then the church meets on Thursday evening. Most of our church people have about 6 hrs each week for rest. They work 16-20 hours everyday. Some have just one day in a month for rest.

Ministering to this special group of people requires a lot of emotional and physical support. Our job includes fetching them frantically crying in the middle of the night, forced to leave their employer’s house when they are terminated. It could be midnight or 3 am.

Here’s where I get a lot of help from my Series X Libronix Library. I bought WBC the whole 58 volumes; Life Application; Handbook of the New Testament and other commentaries. They save me a lot of time when preparing sermons.

This is not to mention how much help I personally receive as I study passages to continue growing in the Lord.

And here’s the best part: Whenever I go to visit our church friends in the underground church, to teach the leaders, I get so much help from these commentaries. I have over 150 volumes of fantastic, scholarly, and helpful books in my computer. It’s like bringing a whole library with me.

Thank you Logos for offering such a gift to the Body of Christ. There’s no help like these books on CD-ROMs.

Sincerely,

[Name Withheld]

Of the Making of Books (Part 4)

Today’s guest blogger is Ken Smith, General Manager of Electronic Publishing Services at Logos.
(This is the next installment in a series of articles about our nearly 60 publishing partners who market their own electronic products using our technology.)
Galaxie Software

Back in 1999, Galaxie Software approached us about using our technology for a very interesting project. They had been electronically publishing back issues of a number of theological journals (Bibliotheca Sacra from Dallas Theological Seminary, Grace Theological Journal and several others) using a different technology platform. In May of 1999, they released Version 3 of their Theological Journal Library utilizing our technology. Version 3 contained a total of 150 years of various journals. By March of 2002, they were up to 250 years of journals in their Version 5 release.

Galaxie has continued to expand the list of included journals and now has 400 years of journals in their collections. The first 250 are still sold as a collection, now designated as Volumes 1-5. Subsequent additions have been released in 50-year collections and are sold separately as Volume 6, Volume 7 and Volume 8), which was just released in September of 2005.

The journals have proven to be one of the most appreciated additions to the Libronix DLS family. Beyond the spectacular savings in cost and space to have 400 years worth of journals at your fingertips, a large percentage of these back issues are only available in select seminary libraries, not readily accessible to most of our customers.

Galaxie has produced a number of other products using our technology, including Dan Wallace’s Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics.

Galaxie is also a partner with the Biblical Studies Foundation in producing electronic editions of the NET Bible.

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