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Please show us your work!

Do you use Logos Bible Software to prepare sermons or lessons? Do you create handouts or PowerPoint slides for your class or congregation?
If so, we’d love to see them. We want to make future versions of Logos Bible Software even more useful, and it helps us to see what you take to the lectern. We’d really appreciate it if you would email some recent samples to slides@logos.com or handouts@logos.com. We’ll keep them to ourselves, and won’t republish or distribute them. We’ll just look at them for ideas on how we can do an even better job of helping you prepare.
(Feel free to send files in whatever format you have them.)
Thank you for your help!

8th Annual Logos Curry Cook-Off!

Today’s guest blogger is Adam Navarrete, who works in the marketing department here at Logos.

Once again one of our quarterly cook-offs has come and gone. While there were some familiar faces in this year’s bunch, a few stepped aside so a new group of competitors could get a chance to claim the prestigious “Curry Champion” title.

The halls were quickly filled to overflowing as the inter-office email was sent out informing employees that the competition was underway.

As usual, the meal was blessed in prayer before the awaited array of curries and steamed rice was fair game. With the head-count nearing one hundred and fifty in the office, it was a mad dash to the front of the line to make sure a sample of the competing curries was available.

Once everyone had a chance to get their curry samples, side dish of rice, and a drink from the free-drink refrigerator, tasting each and deciding on a winner was in order.

After the votes were tallied, the cooks gathered in the large conference room and provided a little information about their recipe before the top three curries were revealed.

The number three spot went to Electronic Text Development’s (ETD) Anthony Apodaca and his Roasted Red Pepper Curry. Challenging for the number one spot was Paul Williams, also from ETD, who settled for second with his Number Two Vindaloo. And the winner of the 2008 Curry Cook-Off was Eli Evans from Design and Editorial, who prepared Red Pepper Beef.

The winners have graciously agreed to share their secret recipes with you. Enjoy!

See also the past Curry Cook-Off posts from 2007 and 2006.

Discourse Grammar in Mark and Luke

For those who want to learn more about discourse grammar, Steve’s area of expertise, I’d strongly encourage you to read Steve’s two recent publications:

The first was published in April in the Review of Biblical Literature (RBL). The second appeared in the inaugural issue of the Journal of the Linguistics Institute of Ancient and Biblical Greek (JLIABG).

Steve also recently posted his CV. Check it out to see a complete list of his publications and conference papers, many of which are available as PDFs on his bio page.

If you haven’t been keeping up with Steve’s series of blog posts, give them a look to learn more about what Steve has been working on here at Logos.

B. B. Warfield Is Coming to Libronix

Yesterday afternoon a long-awaited B. B. Warfield Collection appeared on Pre-Pub. If you haven’t noticed yet, we’ve been systematically looking at some of the gaps in what we offer from some of the most important figures in church history and doing our best to fill them. The ever important Works of John Owen and Works of Jonathan Edwards were put on Pre-Pub in March, and both are now under development. (If you missed them, it’s not too late to pre-order them at the reduced Pre-Pub price.) With enough pre-orders the B. B. Warfield Collection will soon join them.

Our collection includes the standard 10-volume Works of Benjamin B. Warfield, along with 10 other titles. Here’s the complete list:

The Works of Benjamin B. Warfield

  • Vol. 1: Revelation and Inspiration
  • Vol. 2: Biblical Doctrines
  • Vol. 3: Christology
  • Vol. 4: Studies in Tertullian and Augustine
  • Vol. 5: Calvin and Calvinism
  • Vol. 6: The Westminster Assembly at Work
  • Vol. 7: Perfectionism, Part 1
  • Vol. 8: Perfectionism, Part 2
  • Vol. 9: Studies in Theology
  • Vol. 10: Critical Reviews

Other Titles

  • Are They Few that Be Saved?
  • The Canon of the New Testament: How and When Formed
  • Counterfeit Miracles
  • Faith and Life
  • An Introduction to the Textual Criticism of the New Testament
  • The Lord of Glory
  • The Plan of Salvation
  • The Power of God unto Salvation
  • The Right of Systematic Theology
  • The Saviour of the World

That’s more than 7,100 pages of Warfield’s most significant writings. And, of course, Bible references and many other important citations of additional resources in Libronix will be linked, making the study of Warfield more advanced than ever before.

D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones said of Warfield, "His mind was so clear and his literary style so chaste and lucid that it is a real joy to read his works and one derives pleasure and profit at the same time."

To learn more about Warfield and his writings and to place your order, visit the product page.

Using the Topic Search in the Theological Journals

In Monday’s blog post we looked at some ways you can use the author field to find articles written by a particular person in the Theological Journals. As helpful as that is, you likely don’t always go hunting for articles with a particular author in mind. More often you’re probably interested in finding articles that relate to a specific topic you’re studying. This is where the topic search is very helpful.

Every article’s title, subtitle, and main headings have been tagged as topics, so topic searches in the Theological Journals function much like a field search would (i.e., searching only certain portions of text within a larger unit). So a search for topic(justification) limits the search to just the articles’ titles, subtitles, and headings and turns up 65 articles. This kind of searching enables you to easily generate a list of very relevant search results rather than having to work through every article that simply mentions the word justification.

But what if you want to be even more specific in your topic searching? Topic searching in the Theological Journals does not support multiple word topics, so you couldn’t do topic("justification by faith"), even though there are articles with that exact phrase in their titles and headings. Do you have to wade through all 65 hits you got from the topic(justification) search? Fortunately, there is another way to be more precise in the your topic searching.

To find articles containing both "justification" and "faith," you would simply use the search topic(justification) topic(faith).

Instead of 65 articles, we get 22.

You can use as many topics in a single search as you want, enabling you to be as precise as you want. For example, topic(justification) topic(faith) topic(works) would really narrow your results down, turning up a single article ("’A Right Strawy Epistle’: Reformation Perspectives on James" by Timothy George) that contains these three words in one of its headings: "For James ‘Justification by Works’ Refers to the Demonstration of Faith in Deeds of Love." So you can easily be as broad or as narrow as you want as you search the Theological Journals.

Using the topic search like this can also be a quick way to look up a particular article when you don’t know the precise title or location. Let’s say you’re looking for a particular article by Douglas Moo, and you know it has "works" and "law" in the title, but you can’t remember the exact wording or where it’s located. You could do author:moo, which gives you 8 articles in under 10 seconds, or you could do topic(works) topic(law) and get 6 articles in under 5 seconds. Either way you have what you’re looking for very quickly.

Camp Logos Is Coming to Bellingham

In just a couple of weeks, Morris Proctor, authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software, will be coming to Bellingham, Washington for the 2008 National Camp Logos. It is scheduled for June 12-13 and will be held at Bellingham Covenant Church. (Get directions.)

It looks like it is going to be an extra special event. Morris lists seven reasons you might want to consider coming, even if you’re not from around Bellingham.

  1. More training. We expand the training hours from 9 to 4:30 each day so we can give you as much instruction as the body and brain can endure.
  2. Q and A times with the Logos leadership. We’ll have key Logos leaders available each day to answer your questions and tell you about exciting new happenings at Logos.
  3. More food. Your registration includes a huge continental breakfast and a tasty lunch for each day.
  4. Interaction with other Logos users. You have ample opportunity to meet other Logos users like yourself and learn how they’re using the software.
  5. A tour of the Logos headquarters. A highlight each year is when we visit the offices of Logos Bible Software to see where these electronic resources are developed.
  6. Vacation time in the northwest. Plan an extra couple of days to enjoy the beautiful country of Washington state.
  7. Also, this year we will have a special training session for the new HDNT. That’s right, you’ll be one of the first to learn to use this exciting new resource that uncovers the subtle meanings of the Greek language that are many times lost in the English translation.

The cost is $230, and the price covers

  • two days of training
  • a Camp Logos Syllabus
  • breakfast and lunch both days
  • a tour of Logos headquarters
  • a special HDNT Training Session

If you’re wondering if Camp Logos is a worthy investment, read what past attendees have had to say. The subject of Camp Logos comes up in the newsgroups frequently, and the remarks from attendees are incredibly positive. Here are a few snippets:

I just completed two days of Morris Proctor’s Camp Logos . . . . I had hesitated before because of the . . . cost of the two days, but I discovered that Morris is a superb teacher. He gives clear, helpful insight into and practice with the program. I highly recommend it. It think the 74 others who attended would agree.

I strongly recommend the Camp Logos seminars to anyone who regularly uses Libronix. LDLS has so many features and so much power that I find that often many of us only ‘scratch the surface’ of what it can do for us.

If you gain even 1/10th of what Morris presents in the seminar you have received good value from your cost of attendance. Anything beyond that is bonus!

Morris’ camps are great. And compared to what we have invested in Logos, [the cost is] nothing. I never understood people who pay big bucks to get the software and then won’t pay a few more bucks to learn to use what they got.

I’ve been to several MP camps and they have all been great.

Find out more.

It’s not too late to register if you’d like to make your plans to attend.

Also, you might also want to check out the recap from the 2006 National Camp Logos.

Recent Tips from Morris

If you haven’t gotten back into the habit of checking Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog since it started back up at the end of March, you’re missing out. Every Wednesday and Saturday there is a new blog post that will help you become a more advanced Logos user. Even if you’ve been a user for years, you’re sure to pick up some new tips and be reminded of things that you’ve forgotten about.

Here are the last six posts from the Tips & Tricks blog:

A great way to keep up with the latest posts is to add the blog to your RSS reader. The feed to subscribe to is http://feeds.feedburner.com/MorrisProctorsTipsTricks. You can also see the latest posts right in Libronix on the blog section of your Logos home page.

God or a god: A Look at NT Greek Syntax

At Exegetica Digita, one of Mike Heiser’s blogs, he looks at John 10:30-33 and what light our syntax databases shed on the proper translation of the clause at the end of verse 33, "because you, being a man, make yourself God" (in Greek: ὅτι σὺ ἄνθρωπος ὢν ποιεῖς σεαυτὸν θεόν).

Mike explains,

The end of verse 33 is typically taken by both Mormons and Jehovah’s witnesses (for different reasons) as better translated, ". . . you, being a man, make yourself a god," thereby muting this passage as a testimony to the deity of Jesus. They argue that the absence of the definite article before θεόν in verse 33 justifies the translation, "a god."

Mike goes on to show you how to set up a search that will find all the places in the NT with similar syntax to see if the claim holds up that the Greek word for God when it doesn’t have the article (θεός vs. ὁ θεός) should be translated "a god."

The references that his search turns up are Acts 5:29; Gal 4:8, 9; 1 Thes 1:9; 4:1; 2 Thes 1:8; Titus 3:8; and Heb 9:14.

Head over to Mike’s blog to see his conclusion. He even provides you with the syntax search file so you can download it and run it for yourself.

Logos in the Classroom

We just posted a new audio message and transcript from Dale Pritchett, Senior Vice President of Logos Bible Software, at the Academic page. It’s entitled "Logos in the Classroom." The audio runs 15:40 and weighs in at 14.3MB. The transcript is available as a PDF file.

In Dale’s talk you’ll learn some interesting tidbits. For example, last year Logos sold more than 5.2 million digital books. We now have more than 9,000 digital resources available, and we’re on track to produce an additional 2,000 titles every year. Listen to Dale talk about how Logos is revolutionizing the way many Bible college and seminary students and professors are building their libraries.

Logos Named a Best Christian Workplace

Logos has been named a "Best Christian Workplace in the United States" for 2008 by the Best Christian Workplaces Institute (BCWI). BCWI awarded workplaces in six different categories based on surveying more than 7,800 employees in 67 organizations across the US. The survey consisted of 50 questions in categories like job satisfaction, Christian witness, supervisory effectiveness, teamwork, personal growth and development, etc.

Among the other Best Christian Workplaces were The Master’s College and Seminary, Harvest House Publishers, and Crown Financial Ministries. The complete list of the Best Christian Workplaces of 2008 is available at the BCWI website.

As I approach six months here at Logos, I’d have to agree that Logos is a wonderful place to work. The people, the product, and the mission of Logos make working here a joy. There aren’t any jobs listed on the jobs page currently, but check back for future openings.