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Coral Ridge Ministries Partners with Logos Bible Software


We are pleased to announce that Coral Ridge Ministries, Ft. Lauderdale, FL, has joined with us in a brand new, strategic partnership to equip the church for better Bible study and ministry. Truths That Transform, the foundational work on practical Christian truths by the late Dr. D. James Kennedy, serves as the centerpiece of several new Truths that Transform Bible software products.
Truths That Transform Digital Learning Series 1 combines the Truths That Transform book, which covers eighteen transformational truths, with several other resources:
  • Truths That Transform Study Guide
  • 18 Audio Sermons from Dr. Kennedy on MP3
  • King James Version of the Bible
  • New King James Version of the Bible
  • A customized home page for access to specific resources

Four other Truths That Transform collections, which come bundled with the Truths That Transform Digital Learning Series 1, are available:

  • Truths That Transform Bible Study Library
  • Truths That Transform Scholar’s Library
  • Truths That Transform Scholar’s Library: Silver
  • Truths That Transform Scholar’s Library: Gold

These collections bring together the some of the best insights from the fruitful ministry of Dr. D. James Kennedy and the power and breadth of Logos Bible Software. Take the tour to see it for yourself, and watch Brian Fisher, President and CEO of Coral Ridge Ministries, talk about these great new products.
Live on GodTube!
Finally, don’t miss the LIVE Internet-Only Broadcast on Monday, December 17, at 8 pm EST on GodTube.com. Brian Fisher will be talking with Scott Lindsey from Logos Bible Software about the exciting new ways to study the Bible using the revolutionary new Truths That Transform Digital Library System. Be sure to watch! Find out more.

2007 Logos Bake-Off

You’ve probably learned by now from our posts about Chili Cook-Offs (2007, 2006), Curry Cook-Offs (2007, 2006), Soup Cook-Offs (2006, 2005), Salsa Cook-Offs (2006), Bake-Offs (2006), and Thanksgiving Dinners (2007, 2006) that we like to eat! This is just one of the many reasons that working here is so much fun!
Last Friday we had the 2007 Logos Bake-Off. There were 12 entrants and lots of hungry judges! Here they are in action.

While everything was delicious, four desserts rose to the top.
Here are the winners:
1st Place: Don and Tara Everett’s “Chocolate Everything” creation (#12)


2nd Place: Katie Swanson’s Coconut Cream Cake (#6)


3rd Place: Pete and Shara Heiniger’s Chocolate Bundt Cake (#8)


and: Deborah Mickens’ Eggnog Butterscotch Cookies (#9)

We also have one recipe to share. While it’s not one that placed, it’s still sure to please.
Chocolate Star Cookies
by Ryan Husser
Components:

  • ½ cup peanut butter
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • ½ cup (1 stick) butter or margarine
  • 1 egg
  • 1 ¾ cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • About ½ cup addition granulated sugar in separate bowl
  • About 60 Brach’s chocolate stars (available in bulk at Fred Meyer)

Assembly:

  1. Preheat oven to 375° (190 Celsius).
  2. Cream butter and sugars (granulated and brown) in large mixing bowl.
  3. Mix in peanut butter and egg.
  4. Mix in flour, baking soda, salt, milk and vanilla.
  5. Roll dough by hand into ½ inch balls.
  6. Roll dough balls in additional granulated sugar.
  7. Bake for 4 minutes.
  8. Remove from oven, press a chocolate star into the middle of each cookie.
  9. Bake for another 3–4 minutes.

Recipe yields approximately 5 dozen cookies.

Thanksgiving Dinner on My First Day

I picked a great day to start my new job here at Logos. Today we had a very nice spread of turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, stuffing, and much more for our annual Thanksgiving Dinner. (It was early this year because some of the guys will be gone next week at the upcoming ETS and SBL national conferences.)
Here are some pictures from the party.


As you can see, I was a little too excited about the food to smile for the camera. (That’s me in the gray sweater smiling instead at the turkey.)


I’m thrilled to be a part of the team here at Logos. I can already tell that it’s going to be a great place to work. I’ll be working in the marketing department, so I’ll be contributing to the blog on a regular basis. Look for my official introduction in my next post.

Logos at the Evangelical Theological Society’s National Conference

Logos will be at the Evangelical Theological Society’s (ETS) National Conference in San Diego. A few of us are giving papers at the conference. Here are the details; if they sound interesting to you we’d love to see you drop by the sessions.
Of course, we’d also love for you to drop by our booth any time during the conference. So if you’re in San Diego at ETS, come on by and see what we’ve been up to (like the Qumran Biblical Scrolls and also the Semitic Inscriptions project).
We’ll see you in San Diego!



Wednesday, Nov. 14, 4:10-4:50 PM
Garden Salon Two
Richard W. Brannan
Richard Bauckham and Eyewitness Testimony: Does His Narrative Device Occur Outside of the Synoptics?
A recent book by Richard Bauckham (Jesus and the Eyewitnesses) describes Marcan usage of something he calls the “plural to singular narrative device” (Bauckham 156-157). He defines the device using syntactic terminology: “a plural verb … without an explicit subject is used to describe the movements of Jesus and his disciples, followed immediately by a singular verb or pronoun referring to Jesus alone” (Bauckham 156-157). Using this device, Bauckham posits Mark’s usage of Peter’s eyewitness testimony as underlying source for 21 different movements of Jesus (e.g. Mk 1.21).
Bauckham’s exploration of this narrative device is limited to the synoptic gospels. But does the device occur elsewhere? This paper argues that if such a thing as the plural-to-singular narrative device exists, then Ac 18.19 should be considered an additional Lucan instance of the device.



Thursday, Nov. 15, 11:10-11:40 AM
Sunset
Michael S. Heiser
The Professor and Mariamne: The Textual and Statistical Justification for Marooning James Tabor’s “Jesus Tomb Theory” on Gullible’s Island
(This session is part of the Near East Archaeological Society’s general session)
On March 4, 2007 the Discovery Channel aired a documentary touting the discovery of the “Lost Tomb of Jesus.” Negative responses quickly followed from all quarters of academia, across the theological spectrum. There has been one notable exception among biblical scholars, Dr. James Tabor, Professor and Chair of the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Despite the fact that popular interest in the Jesus Family Tomb has declined steadily in the wake of the overwhelmingly unfavorable response, Tabor has defended the film’s thesis. The reason is straightforward: an identification of the Talpiot tomb as the Jesus Family Tomb would lend support to Tabor’s own theory about the historical Jesus. This paper overviews and evaluates Tabor’s ongoing arguments for a Jesus family tomb in support of his own larger thesis about the historical Jesus.



Thursday, Nov. 15, 3:00-3:40 PM
Royal Palm Salon Two
Steven Runge
Teaching them what NOT to Do: The Nuances of Negation in the Greek New Testament
Most descriptions of negation are primarily concerned with highlighting the distinctions between ου and μη. Little attention is given to variation in the syntax of negation constructions. The biblical writers frequently used negation to describe what did not happen as a means of adding emphasis to what did happen. Emphasis can also be assigned by emphasizing a specific component of a clause rather than the entire negated clause. The purpose of this paper is to describe and illustrate the basic patterns observed in the Greek NT. Based on this description, representative examples will be presented that demonstrate the exegetical payoff of careful attention to negation.


Friday, Nov. 16, 11:30 AM -12:10 PM
Royal Palm Salon Five
Michael S. Heiser
Did Jesus Allow for Reincarnation? Assessing the Syntax of John 9:3-4
In a 2003 article in the scholarly journal Filología Neotestamentaria entitled, “The True Meaning of Jn 9:3-4,” J. D. M. Derrett raised the possibility that Jn 9:3-4 (the man blind from birth) could plausibly be construed as evidence that Jesus was not opposed to the idea of reincarnation. Derrett argued that the disciples’ question about why the man was born blind suggests that the disciples were prepared to accept that the man had sinned in the womb or in a previous life. According to Derrett a specific syntactical structure (the “relative negative”— ου/μη [or any negative particle] . . . αλλα, followed by ινα) in Jesus’ response does not denote a categorical denial of the idea. This paper tests this assertion by means of Logos’ implementation of the OpenText.org syntactically-tagged database.

Cast Your Vote for Christian Websites

Whether it’s on the best-seller lists, survey results or in the voting booth many Christians today feel underrepresented, or even misrepresented, by polls and statistics. Now there is a new way to let your voice be heard and “vote” for your favorite websites without having to answer any questions or fill out any surveys—with the Alexa Toolbar. In fact, when you have the Alexa Toolbar on your internet browser you don’t need to do anything aside from typical web surfing to show your support of the Christian websites you visit.

How does this work? It couldn’t possibly be easier. After downloading the Alexa toolbar, your visit to a website is essentially a vote that the site is worth your time. Data is collected and Alexa assigns a rank to every website on the internet. As a site gets more and more popular it gets closer to the coveted #1 ranking (currently held by Yahoo!). This is a free and completely hassle-free way to support the Christian websites you visit and raise their profile amongst secular sites.

Of course there are additional benefits to having the toolbar besides letting your voice (or mouse clicks) be heard. You can instantly click a button and see the “Whois” information about the people that own the site you are visiting, see a suggested list of similar sites, block pop-ups, email the page to a friend and so much more. You can also see the Alexa rank of every website you visit at the top of the page, which is a great way to find out how popular or reputable a website is. For example, if you are purchasing expensive jewelry over the web, it’s comforting to know you are making your order at a website that has an Alexa rank of 16,727 (BlueNile.com) rather than a site that looks impressive, yet is not even in the top 10 million sites on the net! There is no guarantee that an Alexa ranking ensures credibility or lack thereof, it is just one more way to make an informed decision when purchasing over the internet.

Click here to visit the Alexa Toolbar download page and follow the instructions in the page. The toolbar requires Windows and Internet Explorer 6.0 or greater. Firefox users can download the Sparky Toolbar, which is also made by Alexa and provides all the same features and benefits.

When downloading any tool on the internet it’s always important to know what you are getting. Alexa collects data to rank websites and provide related links on your toolbar. For a great description of how and why they do this refer to the Alexa Toolbar Privacy Policy. Regardless of whether or not you use of the Alexa Toolbar, you are sending information to each website you visit as soon as you arrive there. Alexa is simply utilizing that information to provide a service to you and all other toolbar users.

When considering all the benefits of downloading the Alexa Toolbar it’s easy to see why it is so popular. So download the Alexa Toolbar today and start “voting” for your favorite websites.

10 Million Dollar Library Expansion

Dale Pritchett, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Logos, is today’s guest blogger.

A quick search on Google will show there is a whole lot of fund-raising going on to finance brand-new climate-controlled luxury homes for old-fashioned paper books. Construction projects abound—ranging from 1.5 million dollars to more than 40 million dollars. They all share common characteristics; high construction costs, engineers, permits, contractors, bricks and mortar, real estate, parking lots, lengthy construction times and of course, literally tons of paper books.

Guess what else all physical library projects have in common? They all require a substantial commitment on the part of the patron to physically travel in order to visit the books. They are all designed to meet the needs of a thousand year old residential learning model in which a select group of geographically local individuals, for a prescribed period of time, cram as much information as possible into their heads before they scatter across the world and leave the library behind them forever.

With nerves of steel, I will resist the temptation to offer contrasts to the Libronix Digital Library System—you can do that for yourself. The world is changing rapidly and I am sure glad I don’t have to raise money to build library buildings. I feel the pain of those who are caught in the middle of the first major paradigm shift in more than a thousand years.

I will make one final comment: If I could divert funds from just one of those 10 million dollar brick and mortar library expansions to an investment in world missions, I could equip every full-time missionary in the world today with a Scholar’s Library, instead of putting up a building that a few hundred or few thousand people might someday decide to travel to and try to find the right book in. A little goes a long way.

New video of Logos for the Mac

Logos Bible Software for the Mac is getting closer all the time! Yesterday we were able to record our first video showing the software in action.

Click on the image below to view the high-res version of that video. The video may take a few minutes to load. If you really can’t wait, you can view the low res version by clicking the link below the image.

Please note that the video has no sound.

High Resolution (33 MB)Low Resolution (18 MB)

The software is showing books, running searches, comparing versions, creating a Passage Guide, and more. (Today we even inserted a shipping DVD and discovered, copied, and viewed existing electronic books without modification.)

There are bugs to fix, help files to write, features to hook up, and some polishing we need to do on the user interface. It shouldn’t be too long before we’re able to release an Alpha for external testing.

Just a reminder: There is no beta list. When we’re ready for Alpha or Beta testing, we will announce it to this email list and at www.logos.com/mac. So please do email us your encouragement and feedback, but please don’t email us asking to be on the top-secret, VIP-only, private early beta list. Because there isn’t one. :-)

Taking One for the Team

This past Saturday, August 4, eight stalwart Logos employees journeyed to Lynden, Washington (25 minutes north of our offices in Bellingham) to participate in the 2007 Mushball tournament. The tournament was a fundraiser for the Lynden Firefighters Association. Mushball is essentially volleyball, but instead of playing on a court or a sunny beach we trudged around in a slurry of soft mud and water for three hours. Sound gross? We thought so too but boy was it ever fun!

Becoming one with the mush

Yours truly getting a faceful of mushPhoto courtesy of Sarah Richardson

“Go time” for Team Logos

Eliminated!

Team Logos dominated its first game thanks to some hot serving from Mark French (Technical Support) and Heidie Godfrey (Accounting). However, we didn’t last long in the winner’s bracket – losing our next two games and being quickly ousted from the tourney. Despite a few bruised knees and a lingering feeling of griminess we all had a great time and were able to help the firefighters raise thousands of dollars for some upcoming projects.

Fourteen Years and Counting

Today, August 8, 2007, marks my 14-year anniversary as an employee of Logos.
It was back in the summer of 1993, after I graduated from college, that I pestered my way into a job at a small Bible software company that had just moved to my hometown of Oak Harbor, WA. I would never have dreamed that I would grow and the company would grow in the ways we have.
I started in the sales department, answering calls from magazine ads to our 800 number. I can remember devouring the old Logos 1.6 product (on DOS 6.2/Windows 3.1, no less). This was before we even had company email at Logos; before we even had a web page at Logos.com. Hey, some of you long-time Logos users may have even purchased your software from me.
After two and a half years in sales, I moved over to the technical side of the operation, writing short programs to turn files supplied from publishers into Logos books. We worked on pioneering the pre-publication process with projects like Kittel’s 10-volume TDNT and the Liddell-Scott-Jones Greek lexicon.
This has continued to change and evolve as both Logos and I have developed; now I get to play around with the annotation of Greek corpora on multiple levels, (that’s “syntax”, which I’ve blogged about a few times :)) and think about ways to represent that information and make it more accessible and profitable for exegesis of the Holy Scriptures.
Along the way, I met and married a wonderful woman and began a family. What an awesome blessing!
I can’t underscore enough what a great place Logos is to work; and what great friends the people I work with have become. Bob and Dale Pritchett, along with my colleagues Eli Evans, Vincent Setterholm, Michael Heiser, Steve Runge and Sean Boisen (and their respective families) are less like colleagues and more like family to me. They challenge me, they encourage me, and they keep me honest. Working here is fun and rewarding. And the cook-offs!
As year 15 begins, I’m more excited than ever. We have some really cool stuff we’re working on. Have you followed Sean Boisen’s Bible Knowledgebase posts? And have you heard about BibleTech 2008? That’s only the tip of the iceberg. I’m anxious to see where it all leads, and I’m privileged to play a part, however small, in making it happen.
Of course, you might be able to come and join us. We have a bunch of jobs posted online. Don’t let the old dates on some of the descriptions fool you; these are typically standing openings—if you’re the right person, we want to talk with you. So if any of this stuff sounds like it is up your alley, then check out the jobs page and come join the fun. Maybe you’ll be writing your own “Fourteen Years and Counting” blog post on the Logos blog in years to come!

Atoms and Molecules; or, Morphology and Syntax

Anyone who has taken a science class has likely had an introduction to the basic concept of an atom (the smallest particle still holding the properties of an element). This person also likely has an understanding that molecules are built up of atoms.
This is all loosely speaking, of course—serious scientists would differ with my imprecise descriptions and use of these terms. This is why we have a periodic table of the elements. The table visually represents the basic ingredients of what I will loosely call “stuff”.

Thus atoms of hydrogen (H) are different from atoms of oxygen (O). This is well and good; these basic elements that make up “stuff” need to be kept separate and properly defined.
However, life is not so neat. Outside of a science lab, welding shop or hospital, we rarely concern ourselves with pure elements. We concern ourselves with molecules, like the ever-popular H20; two atoms of hydrogen combined with one atom of oxygen—better known as “water”.


H2O, better known as “water”
(courtesy http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/encyclopedia/Water/)

This same sort of relationship exists in grammar. Consider words and information about words (known as “morphology”) are the atoms. And this sort of information—definition, part of speech, etc.—is very helpful.


First Timothy 1:1-2

Here each word (or “atom”) has information associated with it such as a dictionary form (thus a meaning), morphological information (like part of speech) and an English-language literal translation (or a “gloss”).
This information allows one to attempt to deduce further information about groups of words, but relationships are only implied and not expressly denoted. That is, while one may know that the και at the end of line one above functions to join things together (based on morphology as a conjunction that is a “logical connective”), and while reading the text one can intuit what is connected (“God our Saviour” and “Christ Jesus our hope”, based on common noun cases joined by the conjunction), these things are not explicitly marked. They are free-floating atoms that happen to have proximity, their underlying relationship has not been quantified. These relationships (molecules) can be guessed at using atom-level data and proximity, but they cannot be specifically known.
A syntactic annotation makes molecules (word groups, phrases, clauses) of the atoms that are words. The graph below shows that “God our Saviour” and “Jesus Christ our hope” are the items connected by και.


The structure of 1Ti 1.1-2

This is why we think syntax (more specifically, syntactic annotations) is so important. Not because it’s cool (though it is), but because it puts together the individual words (atoms) into more meaningful structures (molecules). It lets us talk about “water” instead of talking about “an atom of hydrogen, followed by an atom of oxygen, followed by an atom of hydrogen”.
Syntax also allows for the combination of molecules, as seen in the above syntax graph. There are relationships between words. So Παυλος (“Paul”) is a “head term word” that is modified (here “defined”) by the whole phrase αποστολος Χριστου Ιησου κατ’ επιταγην θεου σωτηρος ημων και Χριστου Ιησου της ελπιδος ημων (“an apostle of Christ Jesus according to the will of God our Saviour and Christ Jesus our hope”). The relationship between the word and the phrase is one of “definition”. In this case, a new “molecule” is created by adding an “atom” (Παυλος) to an existing molecule (the “definer”) and the relationship that creates the new molecule is specified.
That “definer” consists of two parts, or molecules: the “qualifier” Χριστου Ιησου (“of Christ Jesus”) and the “relator” κατ’ επιταγην θεου σωτηρος ημων και Χριστου Ιησου της ελπιδος ημων (“according to the will of God our Saviour and Christ Jesus our hope”). Both of these molecules further modify αποστολος (“apostle”), telling who Paul serves and by what authority he serves. And this whole structure, the definer, clarifies Paul’s apostleship.
Additionally, because these “molecular” relationships have been specified across the whole of the text, these relationships may now be searched. To use the present example of Παυλος modified by a definer, we can search for where words that are “Names of Persons or Places” (Louw-Nida domain 93, one piece of information assigned at the “atom” level) are modified by definers.
To do this, a search dialog that allows one to visually represent syntactic structure is used to create a query.


A query based on word structure (a.k.a. “syntax”)

This query specifies that a head term must contain a word (or “atom”) that specifies it is within Louw-Nida domain 93, it must also contain a modifier (or “molecule”) that is a definer. This search, when run, locates 473 instances of the syntactic structure in the New Testament. An example search hit is Mt 27.37, which has Ιησους ο βασιλευς των Ιουδαιων (“Jesus, the King of the Jews”) where Ιησους is the head term word (or atom) and ο βασιλευς των Ιουδαιων is the definer (or molecule).
Summary
Much like molecules are groups of atoms that allow us to talk about “water”, “sugar” and “gasoline” without needing to specify the molecular make-up, a syntactic annotation allows one to talk about “subjects”, “predicators” and “complements” without needing to approximate contents.
The syntactic annotations do the analysis, building up higher-level structures from the “atomic” level of word data (word, morphology, lemma, etc.). These structures are useful by themselves in that they document how a particular syntactic approach or philosophy has analyzed the structure of the text. They are further useful in that they provide for higher-level combinations of things to be queried. Rather than approximating all of the ways that words (atoms) may potentially combine to form the molecule “subject”, one simply specifies “subject” to bound one’s search to such structures.
In this way, the text can be read, queried and analyzed at a higher level (clauses, phrases, etc.) without sacrificing the necessary and useful information at the foundational word level.