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Carson vs. Lloyd-Jones—Who Will Win?

Logos March Madness is down to only two authors: D. A. Carson and Martyn Lloyd-Jones.

We started with sixty-four authors. Each round, you chose your favorites. Now there’s just one matchup left. And you’ll get a 75% discount on the winner’s works!

Here’s a breakdown of who each author beat in the last five rounds:

carson D. A. Carson:

Round 1: won vs. Jack Hayford
Round 2: won vs. R. C. Sproul
Sweet 16: won vs. J. I. Packer
Elite 8: won vs. John Piper
Final 4: won vs. N. T. Wright

D. A. Carson is the author of popular works such as:

  • Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament
  • Scripture and Truth
  • Pillar New Testament Commentary: The Gospel according to John
  • The Gagging of God: Christianity Confronts Pluralism

 

Martyn-Lloyd-Jones

Martyn Lloyd-Jones:

Round 1: won vs. G. Campbell Morgan
Round 2: won vs. Abraham Kuyper
Sweet 16: won vs. John Newton
Elite 8: won vs. Bruce Metzger
Final 4: won vs. Charles Spurgeon

Some of Martyn Lloyd-Jones’ most popular works include:

  • Seeking the Face of God
  • Revival
  • The Assurance of Our Salvation
  • Courageous Christianity

Vote now to decide which author’s works will be discounted by 75%

And don’t forget to check out some of the other terrific deals on LogosMarchMadness.com:

Have a favorite to win? This is your last chance. Make your case for your favorite to win in the comments.

Vote now! See all deals here.

How to Attend Pastorum for Free

Pastorum Live 2013 (April 11–12) is right around the corner. With leading biblical scholars, you’ll learn about the Bible’s context and background, the church’s identity, and much more. You’ll focus on practical lessons that you can bring home to your congregation.


And now you can go for free! Just bring two members of your staff and your ticket is on us. Already bought your ticket? Get two staffers to register and you’ll get $25 in Logos credit.

Call us to get your free ticket today! 1-800-875-6467

You Cannot. You Can.

1 Corinthians 5

Sometimes I wonder if God is setting me up to fail. Do you? When you read a passage like 1 Corinthians 5:7–8, do you wonder if God’s asking you to do something you cannot?

“Clean out the old leaven so that you may be a new lump, just as you are in fact unleavened. For Christ, our Passover, also has been sacrificed. Therefore let us celebrate the feast, not with old leaven, nor with the leaven of malice and wickedness, but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.”

This verse makes it sound like we’re supposed to be perfect—how does that work? And in the middle of all this talk of leaven (yeast), why is it important to remember that Christ our Passover lamb has been sacrificed?

How is Jesus our Passover lamb?

In Exodus 12, God tells the Israelites how to observe the first Passover feast. God is about to send the tenth and final plague upon Egypt: the death of the firstborn. The firstborn of every house will die—unless something else dies first.

That something else is a lamb. A perfect lamb.

Every household is to smear the lamb’s blood on their home’s doorposts and lintel. God himself promises, “when I see the blood I will pass over you, and no plague will befall you.”

The Israelites couldn’t keep the plague out on their own. Just as neither you nor I can stay God’s judgment against us. It’s one reason Jesus came to die—to bear the wrath of God in our place (Romans 5:9).

Jesus does what we cannot

Christ, our Passover has been sacrificed. But how do we clean out the leaven of malice and wickedness? Are we really supposed to be perfect?

In his book Fifty Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die, John Piper addresses this question:

“We have been made unleavened in Christ. So we should now become unleavened in practice. In other words, we should become what we are. The basis of all this? ‘For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.’ The suffering of Christ secures our perfection so firmly that it is already now a reality.”

(In case you’d like to see more reasons Jesus came to die, this book is on sale this week.)

Now we do what we can: obey

We’re bought with precious blood, “as of a lamb unblemished and spotless, the blood of Christ” (1 Peter 1:19). Our transformation is secured in Christ; now we obey and clean house. When I ponder Jesus’ sacrifice, I face an abundance of reasons to obey:

  • Christ loved me so much that he died for me; why wouldn’t I follow this person?
  • The Bible states that the perfecting work of Christ is done; if I believe this, I’ll behave accordingly.
  • God has given me an opportunity to participate in the process of becoming more like Jesus; it should be a joy to do so.

This transformation is tough. At times, it feels impossible. But God is faithful, and he isn’t telling us to do anything we cannot.

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

Redeemed through His Blood—Ephesians 1:7

Ephesians 1.7

“Forgiveness costs us nothing. All our costly obedience is the fruit, not the root, of being forgiven. That’s why we call it grace. But it cost Jesus his life. That is why we call it just. Oh, how precious is the news that God does not hold our sins against us! And how beautiful is Christ, whose blood made it right for God to do this.”
—John Piper, 50 Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die

All sin is serious, because even in its simplest forms, sin attempts to work against God

His glory is hindered when we disregard or disobey him, and this is why Christ suffered and died for us. Our sins couldn’t be justified through simply being forgiven; instead, someone had to repay our debts.

“In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of our trespasses”
—Ephesians 1:7

Jesus has shown his love for us both through sending his son to die for us and through forgiving the great amount of sin and unworthiness that previously separated us from God. When we pair the depth of our sins with the horrific death Jesus endured for such a seemingly unworthy cause, his love for us becomes even more apparent than before.

We can take Jesus’ death on the cross personally

The great news about the love displayed through Jesus’ death is that we can take it personally. Those who were alive to witness were amazed by his personal sacrifice, saying things such as “I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me” (Galatians 2:20).

We can rest in the fact that he died for each of us individually. This Easter, remember that not only did he die for us; he died for you specifically.

We’ve received the greatest gift possible

In order to bring glory to God and forgiveness to his people, Jesus paid the highest price possible. And because of this, we receive the greatest gift we could ask for—to be free from our imperfections, and to live forever in the presence of God’s glory.

“Father, I desire that they also, whom you have given me, may be with me where I am, to see my glory.”
—John 17:24

Jesus’ death secured a place for us, and the best is yet to come.

 

Looking for resources for study or meditation this Easter season? Check out our specials for Holy Week.

Learn Ministry from the Best

bryan chapellKnox Theological Seminary welcomes its newest professor: Dr. Bryan Chapell, distinguished professor of preaching, MDiv, PhD. Dr. Chapell comes to Knox from Covenant Theological Seminary, where he’s president emeritus and adjunct professor of practical theology. He was Covenant’s president from 1994 to 2012.

Dr. Chapell is the author of Christ-Centered Preaching, Using Illustrations to Preach with Power, and other important works. He’ll be teaching introductory homiletics in Knox’s master’s programs and contributing to the DMin’s Preaching and Teaching track. More than that, he’ll be working to strengthen Knox’s culture as a seminary that revels in grace.

Dr. Michael Allen, Knox’s dean of faculty, says, “Few people understand the rhythm of gospel-driven Christianity and its effects on Christ-centered preaching like Dr. Bryan Chapell. For these reasons—dear to our convictions about being a Christ-centered, gospel-driven, mission-focused seminary—we couldn’t be more excited about Dr. Chapell joining the faculty.”

Who you learn from matters

Dr. Chapell isn’t Knox’s only academic heavyweight. Drs. Michael Allen, Jim Belcher, Gerald Bray, Warren Gage, Samuel Lamerson, Jonathan Linebaugh, Haddon Robinson, Bruce Waltke—these are some of our time’s leading teachers and thinkers, and you can learn from them directly.

If you’re passionate about preaching and Bible study, you should always be learning. And Knox gives you the chance to learn from the best. See how Knox’s degrees fit your life at DMin.me and SeminaryDegreesOnline.com.

Prepare for Holy Week with Logos

Palm SundayThis Sunday, March 24, marks the beginning  of the Christian calendar’s high point. Starting with Jesus’ triumphal entrance into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday and culminating with his crucifixion and resurrection, Holy Week is a sacred time for Christians.

To help prepare for this important time, we’ve discounted a number of important resources focusing on the Cross and Resurrection. Meditate on powerful books like:

As an added bonus, tune in to Logos Talk Monday, March 25 through Saturday, March 30 and enjoy daily devotionals post focused on this important season.

We’re excited to share this season with you.

Choose Which Authors Get a 50% Discount!

Round 4 ends tonight at 5 p.m. PST—vote now!

Only four authors will move on to the Final 4. For those four authors, we’ll be marking down a selection of works by 50% off.

Round 3’s projected winners are D. A. Carson and Martyn Lloyd-Jones. The matchups between N. T. Wright vs. Douglas Moo and Charles Spurgeon vs. A. W. Tozer are still too close to call. Vote now to decide who moves on!

Best-selling authors from Rounds 1–3

Save 40% on titles by:

Save 35% on titles by:

Save 30% on titles by:

Four more authors’ works will go on sale today at 45% off. And remember: for the authors who advance, you’ll get at least a 50% discount. You choose which authors move on.

Vote now!

Be the First to See Our TV Commercial!

We’re airing our first-ever television commercial during the History Channel’s “The Bible” series. And we want you to be the first to see it.

“The Bible,” the popular 10-hour docudrama, presents the Scripture’s stories from Genesis to Revelation. Since we’re all about getting into the Word, we can’t wait to share Logos with an audience ready to take the next step with their Bible study.

So take a look at our inaugural television commercial, and then invite all your friends and family over on Sunday, March 24, to watch it in the next episode of “The Bible!”


Don’t forget—you can subscribe to our YouTube channel and see all of our super videos!

The Theological Consequences of Kant

When it comes to philosophy, nearly everyone’s heard of Immanuel Kant—and for good reason. Kant resolved a century-long gridlock between the rationalists and the empiricists by proposing a new way of thinking about how we come to know anything at all. Kant is also famous for inspiring competing interpretations. In his wake, two fascinating thinkers proposed different ways of understanding Kant’s theological consequences: Friedrich Schleiermacher and Georg Wilhelm Hegel.

Kant’s revolution

The rationalists argued that knowledge results from the proper use of reason, whereas the empiricists claimed that knowledge derives from sense experience alone. Kant redefined the terms of the debate by asserting a more fundamental claim: we don’t conform to the objects of our perception; rather, they conform to us. We don’t perceive objects in and of themselves; instead, our mind shapes how we perceive objects and the world.

In doing so, Kant made the knower, not the known, the primary object of philosophical inquiry. By extension, we can only know things as they appear to us, not as they are in themselves. This turn toward the subject not only moved the conversation beyond the rationalists and empiricists—it revolutionized the direction of Western philosophy.

Schleiermacher

Since we don’t directly perceive God, Kant’s turn toward the subject undermined the claims of orthodox Christian belief. Friedrich Schleiermacher negotiated Kant’s critique by redefining religion as feeling—the capacity to sense the infinite—believing this to be the best way to preserve the possibility of Christian theology. Neither a creed requiring our assent, nor a moral code that must be followed, religion is consciousness of our absolute dependence on the infinite.

Schleiermacher considered it his responsibility to awaken and cultivate this consciousness in others. He attempts to do so in On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers, arguing that religion’s dogmatic claims—which, after Kant, cannot be established as knowledge—are not religion at all. True religion lies in that which inspired theologians to first speak about God at all: the feeling of absolute dependence on the infinite.

Hegel

Unlike Schleiermacher, Hegel criticized Kant’s critique. He maintained that there is no meaningful way to distinguish between things-in-themselves and our perception of them. He did away with things-in-themselves, asserting that our thoughts about the world are synonymous with the way the world actually is. He also considered the fundamental category of reality to be Mind or Spirit, of which we are simply a part.

Hegel understood the development of human history as coterminous with Spirit’s coming to know itself. His Phenomenology of Mind outlines this dynamic, evolving process in terms of dialectic. In works containing his lectures, Hegel articulates how the evolution of history and religion also reflect this process. For Hegel, Christianity represents the culmination of all religious forms—the one that most accurately reflects Spirit’s understanding of itself.

Understand Kant’s influence on German theological thought

Together, the Friedrich Schleiermacher Collection and the Works of Hegel give you the central texts of these important German thinkers. Discover how they wrestled with Kant’s thought and developed theological proposals that continue to influence Christian theology today. Both collections are on Community Pricing for 80% off! With more bids, the price could drop even further.

Bring these core texts into your library—place your bid now!

Then keep reading—what if only perceptions existed, not objects?

How to Memorize Scripture with Logos

When Jesus was asked, “Which commandment is the most important of all?,” he answered, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.” (Mark 12:28–30).

One of God’s deepest desires is that we love him, but how can we continually grow in our love for God if we don’t know his Word? If our knowledge of God is shallow, how can our love be deep? His greatest command is for us to love him with all our heart, soul, strength and mind—and memorizing Scripture is a great way to keep our love for God and his Word at the forefront of our minds.

Many of us want to be memorizing Scripture, but can’t seem to find the time. And even when we do find time, we aren’t quite sure where or how to begin.

Logos 5 makes memorizing Scripture easier than ever.

 

Strengthen your knowledge of the Bible with Logos’ Scripture Memory Tool, and be sure to check out all of Logos 5’s new features.

Make a commitment to memorizing the Word—get Logos 5 today.