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Learn Ministry from the Best

bryan chapellKnox Theological Seminary welcomes its newest professor: Dr. Bryan Chapell, distinguished professor of preaching, MDiv, PhD. Dr. Chapell comes to Knox from Covenant Theological Seminary, where he’s president emeritus and adjunct professor of practical theology. He was Covenant’s president from 1994 to 2012.

Dr. Chapell is the author of Christ-Centered Preaching, Using Illustrations to Preach with Power, and other important works. He’ll be teaching introductory homiletics in Knox’s master’s programs and contributing to the DMin’s Preaching and Teaching track. More than that, he’ll be working to strengthen Knox’s culture as a seminary that revels in grace.

Dr. Michael Allen, Knox’s dean of faculty, says, “Few people understand the rhythm of gospel-driven Christianity and its effects on Christ-centered preaching like Dr. Bryan Chapell. For these reasons—dear to our convictions about being a Christ-centered, gospel-driven, mission-focused seminary—we couldn’t be more excited about Dr. Chapell joining the faculty.”

Who you learn from matters

Dr. Chapell isn’t Knox’s only academic heavyweight. Drs. Michael Allen, Jim Belcher, Gerald Bray, Warren Gage, Samuel Lamerson, Jonathan Linebaugh, Haddon Robinson, Bruce Waltke—these are some of our time’s leading teachers and thinkers, and you can learn from them directly.

If you’re passionate about preaching and Bible study, you should always be learning. And Knox gives you the chance to learn from the best. See how Knox’s degrees fit your life at DMin.me and SeminaryDegreesOnline.com.

Prepare for Holy Week with Logos

Palm SundayThis Sunday, March 24, marks the beginning  of the Christian calendar’s high point. Starting with Jesus’ triumphal entrance into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday and culminating with his crucifixion and resurrection, Holy Week is a sacred time for Christians.

To help prepare for this important time, we’ve discounted a number of important resources focusing on the Cross and Resurrection. Meditate on powerful books like:

As an added bonus, tune in to Logos Talk Monday, March 25 through Saturday, March 30 and enjoy daily devotionals post focused on this important season.

We’re excited to share this season with you.

Choose Which Authors Get a 50% Discount!

Round 4 ends tonight at 5 p.m. PST—vote now!

Only four authors will move on to the Final 4. For those four authors, we’ll be marking down a selection of works by 50% off.

Round 3’s projected winners are D. A. Carson and Martyn Lloyd-Jones. The matchups between N. T. Wright vs. Douglas Moo and Charles Spurgeon vs. A. W. Tozer are still too close to call. Vote now to decide who moves on!

Best-selling authors from Rounds 1–3

Save 40% on titles by:

Save 35% on titles by:

Save 30% on titles by:

Four more authors’ works will go on sale today at 45% off. And remember: for the authors who advance, you’ll get at least a 50% discount. You choose which authors move on.

Vote now!

Be the First to See Our TV Commercial!

We’re airing our first-ever television commercial during the History Channel’s “The Bible” series. And we want you to be the first to see it.

“The Bible,” the popular 10-hour docudrama, presents the Scripture’s stories from Genesis to Revelation. Since we’re all about getting into the Word, we can’t wait to share Logos with an audience ready to take the next step with their Bible study.

So take a look at our inaugural television commercial, and then invite all your friends and family over on Sunday, March 24, to watch it in the next episode of “The Bible!”


Don’t forget—you can subscribe to our YouTube channel and see all of our super videos!

The Theological Consequences of Kant

When it comes to philosophy, nearly everyone’s heard of Immanuel Kant—and for good reason. Kant resolved a century-long gridlock between the rationalists and the empiricists by proposing a new way of thinking about how we come to know anything at all. Kant is also famous for inspiring competing interpretations. In his wake, two fascinating thinkers proposed different ways of understanding Kant’s theological consequences: Friedrich Schleiermacher and Georg Wilhelm Hegel.

Kant’s revolution

The rationalists argued that knowledge results from the proper use of reason, whereas the empiricists claimed that knowledge derives from sense experience alone. Kant redefined the terms of the debate by asserting a more fundamental claim: we don’t conform to the objects of our perception; rather, they conform to us. We don’t perceive objects in and of themselves; instead, our mind shapes how we perceive objects and the world.

In doing so, Kant made the knower, not the known, the primary object of philosophical inquiry. By extension, we can only know things as they appear to us, not as they are in themselves. This turn toward the subject not only moved the conversation beyond the rationalists and empiricists—it revolutionized the direction of Western philosophy.

Schleiermacher

Since we don’t directly perceive God, Kant’s turn toward the subject undermined the claims of orthodox Christian belief. Friedrich Schleiermacher negotiated Kant’s critique by redefining religion as feeling—the capacity to sense the infinite—believing this to be the best way to preserve the possibility of Christian theology. Neither a creed requiring our assent, nor a moral code that must be followed, religion is consciousness of our absolute dependence on the infinite.

Schleiermacher considered it his responsibility to awaken and cultivate this consciousness in others. He attempts to do so in On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers, arguing that religion’s dogmatic claims—which, after Kant, cannot be established as knowledge—are not religion at all. True religion lies in that which inspired theologians to first speak about God at all: the feeling of absolute dependence on the infinite.

Hegel

Unlike Schleiermacher, Hegel criticized Kant’s critique. He maintained that there is no meaningful way to distinguish between things-in-themselves and our perception of them. He did away with things-in-themselves, asserting that our thoughts about the world are synonymous with the way the world actually is. He also considered the fundamental category of reality to be Mind or Spirit, of which we are simply a part.

Hegel understood the development of human history as coterminous with Spirit’s coming to know itself. His Phenomenology of Mind outlines this dynamic, evolving process in terms of dialectic. In works containing his lectures, Hegel articulates how the evolution of history and religion also reflect this process. For Hegel, Christianity represents the culmination of all religious forms—the one that most accurately reflects Spirit’s understanding of itself.

Understand Kant’s influence on German theological thought

Together, the Friedrich Schleiermacher Collection and the Works of Hegel give you the central texts of these important German thinkers. Discover how they wrestled with Kant’s thought and developed theological proposals that continue to influence Christian theology today. Both collections are on Community Pricing for 80% off! With more bids, the price could drop even further.

Bring these core texts into your library—place your bid now!

Then keep reading—what if only perceptions existed, not objects?

How to Memorize Scripture with Logos

When Jesus was asked, “Which commandment is the most important of all?,” he answered, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.” (Mark 12:28–30).

One of God’s deepest desires is that we love him, but how can we continually grow in our love for God if we don’t know his Word? If our knowledge of God is shallow, how can our love be deep? His greatest command is for us to love him with all our heart, soul, strength and mind—and memorizing Scripture is a great way to keep our love for God and his Word at the forefront of our minds.

Many of us want to be memorizing Scripture, but can’t seem to find the time. And even when we do find time, we aren’t quite sure where or how to begin.

Logos 5 makes memorizing Scripture easier than ever.

 

Strengthen your knowledge of the Bible with Logos’ Scripture Memory Tool, and be sure to check out all of Logos 5’s new features.

Make a commitment to memorizing the Word—get Logos 5 today.

Save 40% on John MacArthur, J. I. Packer, John Calvin, and Others!

The votes have been counted—only eight authors remain as contenders for the Logos March Madness championship. Whose work would you like to see discounted by 75%? Vote now!

Then save 40% on:

Need help sifting through over 500 items on sale? Here are a few of the best-selling authors so far.

Round 1 authors:

Round 2 authors:

Don’t forget to vote this round. Only four will move on, and their works will be discounted 50%!

Who do you want to see win? Vote early, and share who you voted for on Facebook, on Twitter, and in the forums!

Pop Culture, Church History, and St. Patrick

st.patricksday

While St. Patrick’s Day is rooted in religion, today’s pop culture has surrounded the holiday with drinking, luck, and Irish patriotism. This attempted marriage of religion and culture shows up most clearly in the contradictory definitions of St. Patrick’s Day’s most popular symbol: the shamrock.

On one extreme, the four-leaf clover has been commercialized to simply represent good luck. On the other extreme, however, many scholars argue that St. Patrick himself deemed the four-leaf clover a religious symbol, with the three leaves representing the Holy Trinity (one for the Father, one for the Son, and one for the Holy Spirit) and the final leaf representing God’s grace. Between these two extremes lies a murky middle ground, where some argue that each leaf stands for a separate idea: one leaf for hope, one for faith, one for love, and the fourth for luck.

With this strange union of pop culture and religious history, the impact of St. Patrick on church history is often neglected—even on the day that was established because of the saint and his work.

So Logos is offering up to 40% off resources to help you delve deeper into church history and the work of St. Patrick. These resources will examine questions such as: Is St. Patrick responsible for single-handedly converting Ireland to Christianity? Was he the only true apostle of an embattled, crumbling empire? In short, these resources will help you learn why St. Patrick’s Day exists at all.

The Logos St. Patrick’s Day Sale will run from March 15 through March 17 only.

Save today on church history works:

St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland (2 vols.)

Regularly: $34.95

With coupon code STPAT1, it’s only $19.95

St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland presents two volumes on the life and works of St. Patrick: The Confession of St. Patrick and The Life and Writings of St. Patrick. These valuable volumes will especially interest students, professors, and those wanting to know more about St. Patrick and the history of Christianity in Ireland.

Christianity in the British Isles Collection (6 vols.)

Regularly: $119.95

Get it for only $79.95 with coupon code STPAT2

The Christianity in the British Isles Collection offers a comprehensive look at Christianity’s relationship with Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and England. The six volumes cover a variety of fascinating topics, including the history of Anglicanism, the little-known Free Church of England, the parallel Reformation experiences of the British Isles, and the outlook for the Church of England in a modern United Kingdom of many faiths.

The Reformation in Britain and Ireland: An Introduction

Regularly: $39.95

Just $29.95 with coupon code STPAT3

The Reformation in Britain and Ireland is a new and wide-ranging introduction to the Reformation throughout the British Isles. Full treatment is given to the fascinating and often very different but interrelated experiences in England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland.

Christian History & Biography Magazine (issues 1–99)

Regularly: $149.95

Yours for only $109.95 with coupon code STPAT4

Since 1982, this quarterly magazine has examined the events and personalities that laid the foundations of modern Christianity, covering subjects ranging from Martin Luther to Dietrich Bonhoeffer, from the Crusades to modern Christian-Muslim relations. In this massive collection of every issue of Christian History & Biography since 1982, nearly 2,000 articles by hundreds of authors cover every aspect of church history from the early church to the present day.

Lion Histories Series (10 vols.)

Regularly: $89.99

Get it now for $79.95 with coupon code STPAT5

Lion Histories is a major new series aimed at those seeking accessible introductions to key periods, people and themes in Christian history. These histories are excellent resources for pastors, students, Bible-study leaders and Sunday school teachers to gain an understanding of these important events and people in Christian history. This series covers the world of Jesus and Paul, and shows how Christianity expanded throughout the Roman Empire and beyond.

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, rev. ed.

Regularly: $150

Now $109.95 with coupon code STPAT6

The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church, since its first appearance in 1957, has established itself as the indispensable one-volume reference work on the church’s every aspect. This revised edition, published in 2005, builds on the unrivalled reputation of the previous editions. Revised and updated, it reflects changes in academic opinion and church organization.

Exploring Church History

Regularly: $11.99

Use coupon code STPAT7, and get it for only $7.95

James Eckman walks you through the church’s past from Pentecost to the present. This basic, chronological, introduction emphasizes the development of the church and how it came to a consensus on what the Scriptures taught. Through it all, you’ll gain a deeper understanding of the complexities and richness of your faith and its splendid heritage.

Additionally, St. Patrick: The Man and His Work is now available on Pre-Pub and Classic Studies on St. Patrick is now available on Community Pricing.

Know the Arguments for Skepticism and Common Sense

The rationalists relied on reason, not sensory experience, to explain the world. In turn, the empiricists—John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume—argued that knowledge comes from experience, not pure reason. Taken as far as logic allows, that entails some astonishing claims about reality.

Primary and secondary qualities

For Locke, primary qualities exist in the world, and secondary qualities in the perceiver. Solidity, extension, shape, motion, number—these exist whether they’re perceived or not. But attributes like color, sound, and scent exist only when perceived; there can be no image without an eye. (He didn’t reject reason altogether; rather, he thought that knowledge comes from the application of reason to sensory data.)

Berkeley, moved by Locke’s arguments regarding the uncertainty of secondary qualities, went further: he rejected Locke’s primary qualities, too. Berkeley thought that the distinction between qualities invites all sorts of skepticism. If we know only our own ideas, how can we trust them without ever comparing them to unmediated reality?

Perceptions, not material objects

The solution is simple: deny the existence of matter. If an apple is not only our collection of perceptions but also a material object, we may doubt that object, and such doubt is abhorrent to common sense. But if we define the apple as nothing more than our perceptions, it is beyond doubt.

The world doesn’t exist on its own, Berkeley argued—only perceptions do. Being is nothing more than being perceived.

Do objects come in and out of existence as we perceive them? Not quite. God always sees all things; thanks only to his perception, objects persist.

Hume’s doubt of the self

Hume, the most rigorous of the empiricists, developed Berkeley’s claims against the world to their logical end. People, he argued, “are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement.” Since there is no perception of self, there is no self.

This has some incredible consequences:

  • It invalidates Descartes’ “I think, therefore I am,” which now merely assumes the “I” it would prove.
  • It erases the distinction between self and world, which had so long dominated Western thought.
  • It precludes the soul.

But that’s ridiculous!

Hume took empiricism so far that, for most people, it became unbelievable. In turn, Thomas Reid argued that belief in the world is the basis for meaningful philosophy—that if you don’t believe in the world as perceived, philosophy is useless. The difference between object and sensation, he argued, is obvious to common sense. In response to Hume’s doubt of the self, Reid noted that, in order to talk about philosophy, you must believe that you’re talking with another person. If you don’t, you’re insane, and not worth engaging in conversation. Refreshing, no?

On Reid’s common-sense foundation, Alvin Plantinga and Nicholas Wolterstorff developed the modern notion of Reformed epistemology, which defines belief in God as “properly basic”—belief that need not be proven from other truths. Despite the lack of irrefutable arguments for other minds, we believe in them; believing in God is just as reasonable.

Understand skepticism and common sense

Together, the Classics in Empiricist Philosophy Collection and The Works of Thomas Reid give you Locke’s, Berkeley’s, Hume’s, and Reid’s essential arguments, all searchable and cross-referenced. You’ll know the evidence for and against empiricism and common-sense philosophy, and you’ll understand Reformed epistemology’s foundations. Both collections are on Community Pricing for around 80% off; with more bids, the price could go even lower.

Know the arguments for skepticism and common sense—place your bids today:

Then sign up to get news and updates about more classic works of history, literature, and philosophy:





 
Keep reading—now that you know the empiricists, who were the rationalists?

What’s the Purpose of the Gospel?

Pastorum 2013 is quickly approaching, and we’re excited to have speakers such as Michael Goheen, Ed Stetzer, Mark Futato, and others.

At Pastorum 2012, some of the top internationally recognized scholars gathered to dig deeper into God’s Word. Here’s Pastorum 2012 speaker Scot McKnight on the purpose of the Gospel and evangelism:

 

Join Mark Glanville and Lynn Cohick at Pastorum 2013 and unpack the purpose of the Gospel.

“The biblical story is the story of God’s recovering his purposes for creation through the death and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ, and calling people to live as signs to Christ’s restorative reign. How to think of this, how to preach this, how to lead for this, how to gossip this in our churches . . . . these are the questions of Pastorum.”

—Mark Glanville

“I would like to encourage pastors and leaders in reading Scripture well. At Pastorum we will focus on the reality of Jesus as a first-century individual and Jew. We will make connections between our twenty-first century world and the biblical world. We will learn the importance of hermeneutics in our study practices.”

Lynn Cohick

Register now—we’ll see you at Pastorum!