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How to Land a Marketing Job at Logos

Hire MeAs of today, Logos’ marketing department has 21 openings. We’re looking for writers, editors, coders, strategists, managers, and more, and we want to hear from you.

So how do you land a job at Logos?

1. Be distinct

“Objective: self-starter / team player seeks a dynamic web 2.0 position that advances my career and leverages my talents.”

Nope—the last thing you want to do is blend in with generic language. Rather than adapting an online template or a cover letter from a different job, start by studying the job listing. Think about how you would filter out candidates, and write to beat that filter—be specific about how you meet each qualification.

One good way to stand out: get your portfolio online. That lets us quickly get a feel for your work and personality; plus, it shows some tech know-how. Even if you’re no web designer, WordPress makes it simple to get started.

2. Be polished

We want to hire the best people, the people with the highest standards. We also work with extremely tight deadlines. It says a lot if your cover letter and résumé, written without any deadline, are full of spelling and grammatical errors. Check everything you’re not sure about against Merriam-Webster—“Is ‘phenomenon’ plural?” “Does ‘sign-up’ need that hyphen?” Then proofread until everything’s perfect, and then a few times more. Continue Reading…

The Faithlife Study Bible Just Got Better

FaithlifeWe promised that we would continue to add relevant, up-to-date content to the Faithlife Study Bible and accompanying resources, and that’s exactly what we’re doing.

For example, the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the world’s most advanced Bible dictionary, is getting bigger and better. And since the Lexham Bible Dictionary comes with the Faithlife Study Bible, this means the FSB is getting bigger and better, too.

We’re excited to announce the addition of 58 new articles to the Lexham Bible Dictionary. This update includes articles written by scholars such as Alan J. HauserDouglas Stuart, and many others.

These articles cover topics like war in the New Testament, sacrifice in the Old Testament, biblical languages, the history of Mesopotamia, and more. Since October, we’ve added over 150,000 words, making the Lexham Bible Dictionary over 1.7 million words total—all currently free of cost. Continue Reading…

Help Us Make Logos 5 Globally Accessible

Translate

We would love to make Logos available in every language, but we don’t have the in-house language skills to support more than the Spanish versions we currently offer.

If you’re a bilingual Logos user, we’d like your help in translating our software to your native language.

The plan

Our commitment to you is this: if you and other volunteers translate at least 90% of the software, we’ll publish it. You’ll be able to switch between languages in the program settings. Work on more than 20 languages is already underway; the first ones are German, Dutch, Portuguese, Chinese (Simplified & Traditional), Korean, and French.

In addition, we’d like to do complete localization for a handful of languages: translating not only the software itself, but also everything that accompanies it—help files, datasets, web content, and service emails. (Hiring bilingual customer-support staff, too.)

If you’d like to read more about this project, see what Bob Pritchett, our CEO, said in the forums. Continue Reading…

Up to 40% Off New Releases from Baker for a Limited Time!

New releases from Baker are now available for pre-order at a healthy discount for just two weeks. Most of these books won’t be released in print or digital until later this summer and fall, but you can pre-order them right now!

Get the newest books by Stanley Porter, Bryan Chapell, Graham Twelftree, Thomas R. Schreiner, and others—not to mention Douglas Moo’s much-anticipated new commentary on Galatians in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, to be released later this year.

For most of these books, the discount is good for only two weeks, so get your pre-order in now to get the best price. Your card will not be charged until your book is available for download—and we’ll send you a reminder a few weeks before this happens.

Don’t miss out!

40% off for two weeks:

Logos 5: Making Bibliographies a Breeze

Not many people love creating bibliographies. If you’re wise, you’ve been documenting your sources as you go. But you still have to compile that information into a workable bibliography. Often that obligatory but important task becomes a time-consuming afterthought—but not with Logos 5.

Logos makes bibliography creation a snap. It remembers what you’ve been reading, citing and organizing your sources in your chosen citation style automatically. You can add your own custom notes and annotations, and even share your bibliography with friends and colleagues on Faithlife, export to a word processor, or print straight from Logos 5.

 

The bibliography feature is another way Logos 5 is making Bible study more intuitive. Check out Logos 5′s other intelligent features, and see which base package is perfect for you. 

Save up to 50% on Mother’s Day Gifts

Mother's Day Sale

Picking out a Mother’s Day gift can be a challenge. That’s why we’re presenting a whole range of gift ideas to choose from. These resources will help the mom in your life deepen her Bible study—a gift that will make a lifelong difference.

Pick the gift that’s right for her

Womens Bible Study Bundle1. Women’s Bible Studies Bundle

Save 50% or more*

The Women’s Bible Studies Bundle offers practical, sound biblical advice for women.

Use coupon code MOMSDAY13 at checkout through May 13.

2. Marriage and Family Bundle

Save 50% or more*

The Marriage and Family Bundle’s rewarding, practical titles will give her guidance on marriage and parenting.

Use coupon code MOMSDAY13 at checkout through May 13.  Continue Reading…

3 Reasons You Should Get to Know Mary

Mary Devoted to God's PlanIf we’re truly honest, few of us would want to fill Mary’s shoes in real life. Being an unwed mother is no easy task in our society; in Mary’s culture, it could merit the death penalty. Yet when Gabriel burst into Mary’s home and announced the risky role God had chosen her for, she not only accepted—she sang, proclaiming herself blessed among women.

Perhaps this is why, when we think of Mary, we struggle to see her as anything other than the mother of Jesus. As we watch her unflinchingly scrap her own hopes and aspirations in service to God, we subconsciously elevate her as someone whose selflessness and grace are so far beyond our own experience that she can’t serve as a realistic role model.

But the Gospels tell a different story. They portray a young woman who sacrificed everything to become God’s servant, yet struggled in ways that feel strikingly familiar. Here are three reasons Mary is someone you should get to know.

1. She made mistakes

Any parent who has accidentally driven off without their child can take comfort, knowing they’re in good company. Imagine what Mary must have felt when she realized that she and Joseph had left Jesus—God’s Son—behind in Jerusalem after the Passover celebrations. It took her three days of frantic searching to locate him. Continue Reading…

Free Book of the Month: Horae Homileticae, Galatians to Ephesians

Horae HomileticaeCharles Simeon’s Horae Homileticae, Volume 17: Galatians to Ephesians is free during the month of May! Get yours now.

Charles Simeon (1759–1836) was a well-known evangelical clergyman. His most notable work, Horae Homileticae, is a collection of sermons published in 1832 to benefit the next generation of young pastors.

“[Horae Homileticae] is the best place to go for researching Simeon’s theology. You can find his views on almost every key text in the Bible. . . . What Simeon experienced in the word was remarkable. And it is so utterly different from the counsel that we receive today that it is worth looking at carefully.” —John Piper

When you download volume 17 of Horae Homileticae, you’ll get 12 chapters of scholarly, spiritually rich insight into Galatians and Ephesians. Simeon breaks down the Scriptures chapter by chapter, which allows his exposition to focus on the books’ important themes: the fruits of the Spirit, freedom through Christ, and more.

“Be Bible Christians, not systems Christians.” —Charles Simeon (click to tweet)

Download Simeon’s Horae Homileticae, Galations to Ephesians today! Then enter to win the entire Horae Homileticae commentary.

Have a quote or another work by Charles Simeon that you’d like to share or recommend? Let us know in the comments!

Augustine vs. Luther: Sexuality and Marriage

Augustine Versus Luther on Sin Sexuality and Salvation

Augustine and Luther agreed on many things, but the different ways they understood the first sin, its consequences, and its remedy continue to shape Protestant beliefs about sexuality and marriage.

Augustine and Luther’s diverging beliefs

For Augustine, in the late 300s and early 400s, the original sin of pride produced lust, which could be defeated through chastity. From him, the church inherited a sexuality shrouded in shame.

Luther saw original sin as unbelief, which led to pride—epitomized, in his view, by the Roman Catholic Church of the 1500s. For Luther, marriage was the remedy for self-righteous pride, and from him the church inherited an exaltation of marriage and sexuality.

Augustine fought personal issues stemming from his promiscuous pre-conversion lifestyle. His youthful lust drove him to find a lifetime of salvation in his relationship with Christ. He also battled two heretical groups and walked a tightrope of rhetoric. Forced to maintain the precarious balance between them, he didn’t pursue his theology far enough to reach an esteem for marriage and sexuality. Continue Reading…

Christ Is Risen! The Eastern Orthodox Celebration of Pascha

Easter (or “Pascha,” the Greek word for “Passover”) has yet to come for the Orthodox Church. While many Christians celebrated on March 31, a full five weeks separate the celebrations this year—Pascha takes place this Sunday, May 5. Let’s take a brief look at not only the history behind these differences, but also the manner in which Eastern Christians celebrate the Lord’s resurrection.

The dating of Easter has always been a complicated issue, going all the way back to the second century. At that time, the main divide was between those who celebrated on precisely the 14th day of Nisan (the Jewish Passover) and those who celebrated on the Sunday following the 14th of Nisan. This variance came to a head at the first Council of Nicaea (AD 325), when that assembly of bishops decided to regulate the celebration to always occur on a Sunday, or what had come to be called “the Day of the Lord” (Rev. 1:10).

A 19-year cycle of celestial calculations was developed, and this cycle, connected with the Julian calendar, has remained in use in the East. An 84-year cycle came to be used in the Western half of the empire, and so the first discrepancy (since the first Council of Nicaea) began to occur. With the assistance of the best astronomers and scientists of the time, Pope Gregory XIII revised the Julian calendar in 1582 in order to improve its accuracy. A reform of the Western lunar calendar—connected with the dating of Easter—also occurred. Continue Reading…