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How to Retrieve Your Deleted Logos Notes

Documents.Logos.com lets you store your study notes, presentations, sentence diagrams, reading plans, and more—all in one place. And if you delete an important document, it’s easy to get your work back.

Here’s how to undelete files:

  1. Log in at Documents.Logos.com with your Logos.com credentials.
  2. Using the dropdown menu in the top-left corner, filter documents by visibility.
  3. Select “Deleted” to see all your deleted documents.

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  1. Just undelete the document you want back!

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If you don’t remember deleting a document, but you can’t seem to find it at Documents.Logos.com, it may be attached to a Faithlife group. Use the dropdown menu under your username to view your current groups and the documents associated with them.

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Documents.Logos.com makes it easy to collaborate and share. Start using it today!

How Ancient Thought Agreed (and Disagreed) with the Early Church

Stoicism, a school of Hellenistic thought founded in the third century BC and popular through AD 529, was more than a philosophy—it was a way of life. In this scope as a worldview, it was, writes Paul Tillich, “the only real alternative to Christianity in the Western world.”

But, fascinatingly, Stoicism shared more than scope with Christianity. It came to many of the same conclusions about how to think and live.

Who were the Stoics?

stoics-of-the-roman-era-collectionBeginning with Zeno of Citium, the Stoics located happiness not in goods or success but in virtue alone; they emphasized self-control as the path beyond destructive emotions. This self-control took the form of:

  • Meditation. The Stoics would, visualizing their personal futures, imagine the worst possible outcomes—not as distant, unlikely events, but as present sufferings. They sought to realize that even the worst misfortunes can be survived and are not worth fearing.
  • Training. They practiced rigorous physical discipline, from sexual abstinence to hard exercise to the avoidance of tempting foods.
  • Self-vigilance. They monitored their thoughts and emotions, seeking to avoid lust, greed, and ambition in favor of reason.

Seneca and Epictetus argued that a properly practicing Stoic was, in a sense, beyond misfortune. The Faithlife Study Bible’s article on Paul and the Stoics notes, “Stoics believed that the ideal sage was one who could face calamity and misfortune with casual indifference, feeling neither sorrow nor regret. Stoics were proud of their ability to endure hardships and often paraded their fortitude and strength through ‘hardship catalogs,’ which listed the adversities they had endured.” (It’s that serene indifference to misfortune that colors our modern sense of stoic.)

Similar notions of the self

If contemplation, discipline, and vigilance sound familiar, it’s because the early church and Stoicism were in so many ways alike. Both were characterized by:

  • An emphasis on hardship. As the FSB points out, Paul’s letters also feature “hardship catalogs”—for example, 2 Cor. 4:8–9 and 6:9–10. And, like the Stoics, Paul believed that enduring hardships leads to growth in character: he writes, “we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character” (Rom. 5:3–5; cf. 1 Cor. 9:24–27).
  • A sense of man’s depravity, and a constant self-examination. Like the early Christians, the Stoics regarded humanity’s natural state, with its lust, ambition, and other impulses, as deeply flawed. Both worldviews focused on the observation of self and the suppression of wrong thought.
  • An inner freedom from the world. Adherents to both worldviews lived apart from the world’s shortcomings and hardships. The early Christians looked with hope to the world that is to come; the Stoics reminded themselves that all is predetermined and that misfortune is illusory.
  • An aversion to excess. Since the Stoics and the Christians both regarded greed as wrong thinking, they shared a distaste for material excess. For the Stoics, mere wealth wasn’t bad—it simply wasn’t good. “Wealth consists not in having great possessions,” said Epictetus, “but in having few wants.”

Differing notions of the divine

But, though Stoicism shared much with Christianity, it differed profoundly in its account of the divine. For the Stoics, the universe was “a vast quasi-rational being with intelligence and will” (FSB), whose animating force they called (what else?) logos. They didn’t believe in the afterlife; they did believe that the universe would end and then repeat itself.

(You’ll notice that the Stoic outlook far anticipated cosmologies we regard as modern. The notion of God as the universe’s totality reappeared with Spinoza and, famously, Einstein; eternal recurrence was taken up by Nietzsche and Schopenhauer.)
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Of course, Christianity’s and Stoicism’s distinct understandings of divinity entailed differing ways of life. Sharyn Dowd, in Reading Mark, notes that:

The Stoics . . . were also determinists; they believed that everything that happened was caused by the universal divine logos that pervaded and controlled all nature and human life. Therefore, the Stoics did not believe in petitionary prayer. People should accept the life circumstances decreed for them by the divine and not seek to change those circumstances in any way. (Emphasis added)

Even the Christian ascetics, so like the Stoics in their emphasis on discipline and their distaste for worldly excess, operated within different spheres and worked toward different goals:

  • For the Stoics, the work of self-examination was largely private. For the early Christian ascetics, penance and self-examination were deeply public, instantiated in professions of faith and confessions.
  • The Stoics sought self-control in order to master the self. The ascetics sought self-control in order to renounce the self.
  • For the Stoics, dependence on the world was to be replaced by dependence on oneself—”The wise person,” taught Seneca, “is self-sufficient.” Paul, in contrast, taught that Christians are profoundly dependent on God (FSB).
  • For the Stoics, love was at best suspect, toxic to self-sufficiency. For Paul and the early Christians, love was everything (FSB).

But despite these key differences, the parallels between Stoicism and Christianity—an emphasis on hardship, an understanding of humanity as innately flawed, a vigilant self-examination, an inner freedom, an aversion to excess—are remarkable.

* * *

diogenes-laertius-lives-of-eminent-philosophersStoicism was the immediate context within which early Christianity flourished—the great alternative in terms of scope as a worldview, the status quo that the church rejected in radical ways. To know the one is to better know the other.

Noet offers the key Stoic texts in the Stoics of the Roman Era Collection (currently 81% off on Community Pricing!), which sets you up with the core works of Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. The early Stoics—Zeno, Cleanthes, and Chrysippus—left us less, but we can still study them in Diogenes Laertius’ invaluable Lives of Eminent Philosophers, on Community Pricing for 83% off.

Keep learning about Stoicism and Greco-Roman context: place your bids on the Stoics of the Roman Era Collection and Diogenes Laertius’ Lives of Eminent Philosophers.

Then deepen your library with Noet’s vast Classical Foundations Bundle—39 volumes of essential ancient and modern philosophy, 21 volumes of Greek and Latin resources, the famous Harvard Classics (designed as a Harvard education on a five-foot shelf), and the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection.

P.S. Still not convinced that philosophy matters?

Create a Legacy at Your School with Logos 5!

Logos 5What if every seminary student had cutting-edge academic tools—word studies, lexicons, exegetical guides, reverse interlinears, and other original-language resources? What if they could study from an immense library of networked texts, full of classics, commentaries, and contemporary titles? And what if they could create bibliographies with ease?

For students at Dallas Theological Seminary (DTS), this isn’t a fantasy—it’s a reality!

Underwritten by generous donors and a small portion of students’ technology fees, DTS will be equipping more than 2,000 students with Logos 5 to aid their theological studies. This means that every student, no matter their income or educational program, will have access to the very best tools and resources for their biblical studies.

Logos 5: an invaluable tool

The best part of the DTS program is that, when students’ formal education is over, they’ll be able to take Logos 5 into their future ministry!

Logos 5 is more than a tool capable of academic-level study. It’s an important resource in the lives of pastors, counselors, youth leaders, and teachers. With Logos 5, these graduating students will be equipped with an immense library and helpful features to support a life’s work in the Word.

Make an investment in your alma mater!

Are you looking to make a lasting impact in the lives of students at your alma mater or another school? You can! Create a legacy with a donation of Logos 5 to the school of your choice.

If you’re interested in purchasing bulk licenses for your seminary or Bible college, please contact our sales team:

Academic SalesAcademic@Logos.com | (800) 878-4191

Get the Best Prices on These Homeric Greek Resources!

Homer rightly occupies pride of place in the Western classical tradition. To be educated in classical Greece and Rome was to know his poetry. That still holds true today: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey often serve as the starting points of a classical course of study.

As part of our effort to apply Logos’ study tools to the classics, we’ve recently increased our offerings of Homeric texts. Right now, you can get the best prices on several primary and secondary texts, as well as resources to help you learn Homeric Greek.

Pre-order these Homeric resources before prices go up!

Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey (8 vols.)

Regularly $59.95—get it for $49.95 on Pre-Pub

The Loeb Classical Library editions of Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey include English translations and the original Greek with morphological tagging. Read them side by side for comparison, or look up Greek words with A Homeric Dictionary for Schools and Colleges.

Reading Course in Homeric Greek (2 vols.)

Regularly $44.95—get it for $29.95 on Pre-Pub

Learn to read Homer in his original Greek. Designed to develop an accelerated reading proficiency, this comprehensive introduction to Homeric Greek surveys grammar, orthography, phonetics, morphology, and syntax while immersing you in Homer’s poetry with selections from the Iliad.

A Homeric Dictionary for Schools and Colleges

Regularly $23.95—get it for $17.95 on Pre-Pub

This dictionary, the standard Homeric dictionary ever since its publication, gives students of Homer instructive, contextual impressions of Homeric Greek. Optimized in Logos for use with Homeric Greek texts, this resource allows you to move seamlessly between Homer’s poetry, rich lexical entries, and over 100 images.

Homeric Greek—A Book for Beginners

Regularly $19.95—currently $14 on Community Pricing

This classic text provides a comprehensive introduction to Homeric Greek. It addresses grammatical and lexical content through a series of guided lessons that draw from the Iliad, making it a wonderful aid for learning Homeric Greek. You’ll also get Greek–English and English–Greek vocabulary lists, as well as a brief introduction to Attic Greek.

Bidding closes this Friday, Oct. 18!

Hesiod: The Homeric Hymns and Homerica (2 vols.)

Regularly $17.95—currently $7 on Community Pricing

Complement your study of the Iliad and Odyssey with this selection of primary texts from the Homeric age. This Loeb Classical Library edition includes the work of Hesiod, a younger contemporary of Homer’s who also wrote important poetic works such as Theogony and Works and Days. You’ll also get the Homeric Hymns and Homerica—a series of poems once attributed to Homer because of similarities in style, but no longer believed to be his work.

Expand your facility in Greek while engaging a core figure of the classical canon: pre-order these Homeric resources before prices go up!

5 Community Pricing Deals You Don’t Want to Miss

If you want to get amazing prices on classic resources, you can’t go wrong with Community Pricing. Here are five Community Pricing deals you’re about to miss:

Classic Studies on the Atonement (32 vols.)

This 32-volume collection of late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century studies is crossing over at $20! That’s less than 62 cents a title. Place your bid by noon (Pacific Time) Friday, Oct. 18, to get this amazing price.

You’ll get titles like:

The Baptist Encyclopaedia (2 vols.)

Discover the Baptist tradition’s rich history with biographical sketches of Charles Spurgeon, John Bunyan, and other Baptist luminaries, along with detailed illustrations of the London Metropolitan Tabernacle (where Spurgeon preached to tens of thousands) and the Bedford jail (where Bunyan wrote his classic Pilgrim’s Progress). Explore Baptist history’s formative events and institutions, such as the founding and development of the Southern Baptist Convention, born of a need to support pioneering Baptist missionaries like Adoniram Judson and Luther Rice.

If you’re interested in the history of Baptist thought, this is resource is a must-have.

Works of Hegel (13 vols.)

Interested in modern thought? Hegel’s influential philosophy is worth knowing. And if you bid now, you’ll get his major philosophical works, plus a number of important lectures, for 87% off. That’s 18 volumes of historically significant philosophy for only $25!

Joan of Arc Collection (3 vols.)

Few people have captured the world’s imagination like Joan of Arc. If you’re interested in understanding this legend’s story, this three-volume collection is the place to start.

You’ll get:

  • Mark Twain’s well-researched novel Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc
  • The standard reference source for historical research, The Trial of Jeanne D’Arc
  • What many believe is the most trustworthy manuscript of her trial, The Trial of Joan of Arc, Being the Verbatim Report of the Proceedings from the Orleans Manuscript

These three volumes are currently only $18! Bid now.

The Covenanters (2 vols.)

About to cross over at $27, these seventeenth-century books revitalized the National Covenant in Scotland. They argue against Roman Catholicism, seeking to establish the Presbyterian Church as Scotland’s sole religion.

“Dr. Hewison’s two lordly volumes on that period, The Covenanters, give only the traditional view expressed with extraordinary vigour and rigour.”
Andrew Lang

“The value of this book lies in the fact that it shows the men of the covenants and their deeds in such a way that the student of history may calmly judge them, and be assured at the same time that in making his judgment he has before him the available relevant facts.”
The Glasgow Herald

Don’t miss these deals! And check the Community Pricing page for more great opportunities to save.

Are You an International Market Specialist?
We Want to Talk to You

InternationalMarketsLogos is growing like crazy, and we don’t plan on slowing down. That means that we’re looking for more awesome people—and you could be one of them! Check out our openings to see where you might fit on the Logos team.

Growth around the world

Our mission is to serve the church by getting powerful, life-changing Bible study tools into the hands of people all over the world. And since we began translating Logos into more than 20 languages, demand abroad for Logos has only grown. That’s why we’re looking for talented, motivated specialists to guide our growth in a variety of international markets:

If you’re bilingual and you know the Christian market, we want to speak with you!

We’re also looking to hire specialists in several English-speaking countries:

Visit Logos.com/Careers to apply today!

Latin Scholars: Save on Key Resources Before Prices Go Up!

Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic aren’t the only ancient languages of theological importance. Many of the church’s richest texts were written in Latin—Ambrose, Jerome, Augustine, and far more. That wealth of early-Christian content makes learning Latin a valuable investment in your studies.

And for a little while longer, you can get Pre-Pub savings on two educational collections from Focus Publishing / R. Pullins, plus even deeper Community Pricing discounts on Latin primary sources and the famous Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary!

27% off the Introduction to Latin Collection

introduction-to-latin-collectionThis three-volume collection, an up-to-date first-year college grammar, gives you everything you need to learn and teach the language. The companion workbook adds challenging exercises, extensive vocab lists, and comprehensive English–Latin and Latin–English glossaries. You’ll also get By Roman Hands, a look at Latin inscriptions and graffiti as they appeared on Roman monuments, walls, and tombs. The result is an innovative union of language and culture—one that prepares you to grasp and discuss Latin nuance. Pre-order now and get 27% off!

30% off the New Steps in Latin Collection

new-steps-in-latin-collectionThese three volumes, designed for beginning students, set aside abstract grammatical principles in favor of need-to-know grammar, morphology, and syntax. Each volume consists of 30 lessons intended for a year-long course in Latin; the collection deals with numerous Latin documents, helping you learn in context. The vocabulary is based on Cicero, Virgil, Ovid, and Pliny the Younger, so once you’ve worked through the New Steps, you’ll be ready to explore the classics. Pre-order now and get 30% off!

70% (or more!) off Latin primary sources

You’ve learned Latin. Now it’s time to polish your skills with some of the West’s greatest authors. You can pick up these primary sources for 70% off or more—and with more bids, prices could go even lower.

  • Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things | currently 72% off
    Lucretius’ only surviving work aligns with the Epicurean philosophy against divine intervention. This book, the primary source of modern knowledge on Epicurean thought, played an important role in the development of Atomism.
  • Works of Prudentius (4 vols.) | currently 73% off
    Prudentius, the famous fourth-century hymnist and poet, influenced such famous works as the Divine Comedy, Everyman, and The Pilgrim’s Progress. In his collected works, you’ll find his thoughts on Christ’s divinity, Marcion’s gnostic dualism, and the Bible’s iconic scenes.
  • Latin Language and Culture Collection (18 vols.) | currently 74% off
    Study On the Latin Language (one of the earliest ventures into linguistics), Remains of Old Latin (a freezeframe of Latin in the making), and Attic Nights (a look at the intersection of Latin language and Roman culture).
  • Pliny’s Natural History (20 vols.) | currently 80% off
    Across 37 volumes, Pliny the Elder covers botany, zoology, astronomy, geology, geography, mineralogy, and more. This is a crucial source of information on the Roman era’s characteristics and technological advances.
  • Works of Ovid and Horace (16 vols.) | currently 83% off
    Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a mythological history of the world, is regarded as one the most influential poems in history; Horace’s witty, serious poems, wildly successful in their time, have remained popular through the ages.

82% off Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary

lewis-and-shorts-latin-dictionaryYou have the Latin skills. You have the primary sources. Now you’re ready to take advantage of the best Latin dictionary. Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary, better known as “Lewis and Short,” covers the classical through late-medieval periods. You’ll get 2,000-plus pages of lexical data, contextual examples, and Logos’ smart tagging—when you come across unfamiliar Latin words in tagged texts, you can jump to definitions quickly and easily.

This classic resource won’t be on Community Pricing for long. Bid now at 82% off!

Study theology and church history in the original Latin: invest in these resources before the prices go up.

Or keep reading—how well do you know the sophists?

The Importance of the Church Fathers

The theological insights of the early Greek and Latin Church Fathers have shaped the course of Christian history. From the Trinity and original sin to the scriptural canon and just war, looking to the early Church Fathers helps us better understand the development of Christian doctrine throughout the millennia.

The Church Fathers’ explorations of Scripture have grounded biblical commentary up to the modern era. To ignore the writings of great theologians like Augustine, Basil, Ambrose, and Chrysostom is to ignore the very roots of Christian theology. But these early patristic texts can be either difficult to find, difficult to understand (because of translation issues), or both.

In Logos, The Fathers of the Church Series provides an all-in-one patristic resource that eliminates two primary difficulties in patristic research: scope and translation. It is by far the most exhaustive patristic resource available in Logos, giving you an unparalleled ability to study these formative years in Christian history. With nearly 50,000 pages of primary-source material spanning the first through fifth centuries, easy-to-read translations brand-new to Logos, and an array of titles that can’t be found anywhere else, this series is unlike any other in the world of patristic scholarship.

A few people have had questions regarding what’s in this series compared to our Early Church Fathers Collection. Here’s what you should know:

  •    Though there is a little overlap between this series and the Early Church Fathers collection, the vast majority of these texts are brand-new to Logos. 
  •    Even with the resources that do overlap (such as some of Augustine’s works), the Fathers of the Church Series provides totally new translations produced by top-tier scholars. In many cases, the texts in the Fathers of the Church Series are easier to read and digest.
  •    About 20 of this series’ works are available in the public domain. The rest can only be purchased from publishers, and you’ll find some titles that are exclusive to this series.
  •    The series is divided into five main collections, which you can choose to purchase individually:
  1. Fathers of the Ante-Nicene Era (23 vols.)
  2. Greek Fathers of the Nicene Era (35 vols.)
  3. Latin Fathers of the Nicene Era (25 vols.)
  4. St. Augustine (30 vols.)
  5. Fathers of the Post-Nicene Era (14 vols.)

With Logos’ tools and functionality, this series is hands-down the most powerful patristic study tool available anywhere.

Explore the roots of Christian history and theology with the best patristic library on the market: pre-order the Church Fathers Series today!

The Advantage of Books Published by Logos

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collectionWhen you own a book in Logos, you’ll receive periodic updates—absolutely free. These revisions offer more than just corrected typos. You get more recent data, new milestones for better navigation, links to new resources, and increased functionality.

Updating original content

We’re now publishing original content, like the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the Faithlife Study Bible, and the Lexham Bible Guides. Because we produce these resources in-house, we’re able to update them by adding brand-new content. We’ve already added to the Faithlife Study Bible and the Lexham Bible Dictionary, and now we’re adding content to make Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians even better.

Updating Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians

Many of you have purchased Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians either as an individual volume or as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection. Written as a research guide, it has already helped many of you deepen your study of Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians by highlighting the critical issues in the text, pointing you to the key commentators, and explaining their positions.

Now we’ve enhanced the guide with more than 30% new content, including more analysis, more annotated links for each of the issues discussed, and several new Issues and Background Studies. We’ve also added discussions of nine additional commentaries, including new links to 18 different journal and dictionary articles. This added content will help you study Ephesians’ key interpretive issues while connecting you with the depth and breadth of your Logos library.

Incorporating your feedback

After releasing Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians—the first Lexham Bible Guide we produced—we received some helpful feedback from you on how we could make it even better. We listened to your ideas, and we learned from writing later volumes in the series, like the Genesis Collection. Based on this input and experience, we’ve incorporated a broader range of commentaries in annotated links from the Ephesians volume, including more discussion of resources available in base packages, like John Muddiman’s commentary on Ephesians from Black’s New Testament Commentary Series. We’ve also added specific Bible milestones throughout the Issues and Key Word Studies, making it easier for you to navigate.

The best part is that if you already own Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians, you get all of this new content absolutely free. If you don’t own it yet, you can get it today as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection. Use coupon code LBGEPOC to receive 10% off through October 31!

Logos Mobile Education: Focus on Faculty

LME-LogoA few months ago, the era of Logos Mobile Education began with the Pre-Pub release of the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle. Mobile Ed brings the professors, the library, the visual demonstrations of software features, and the online classroom community directly to you—on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device. It’s education where you are.

A distinguishing feature of Mobile Ed is its faculty. Mobile Ed professors are seasoned classroom teachers, each with a minimum of 10 years’ experience. They’re also dedicated scholars and clear thinkers with considerable experience teaching in the local church. Many are well known as authors of books in the Logos Digital Library.

Experience, scholarship, and engagement

Faculty participation in Logos Mobile Ed was driven not only by experience and scholarship, but also by each professor’s ability to engage the audience in a conversational style. Mobile Ed lectures aren’t recorded with a video camera in the back of the room. The professors speak directly to you, one on one, in brief lecture segments.

The Mobile Ed format allows us to include professors from institutions all over the world. This enables us to present curricula offering specific interpretive and theological viewpoints from professors committed to those perspectives, while also allowing you to explore alternative positions if you so desire. The result is a unique faculty of scholar-communicators whose assembly would be impossible in a traditional educational experience.

Take the next step—or get started—on your journey to greater biblical and theological knowledge today with the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle