Get Christmas Specials All December Long!

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Thanksgiving is over, and Christmas is a short three weeks away. That means it’s time for some great discounts on Logos 5 base packages, 12 Days of Logos products, and new and improved bundles!

Logos 5Get 15% off a new Logos 5 base package

Through January 6, use coupon code L5CHRISTMAS to get 15% off any new base package! We’ve handpicked the most useful, in-depth commentaries, lexicons, language and grammar tools, and more, and with our bundling discounts and the Christmas sale, you’ll know you’re getting an outstanding value.

Instead of spending time and money putting together a collection piece by piece, pick from one of our carefully curated base packages at 15% off. There’s a library that’s right for everyone.

12 Days of Logos 2013 BlogThe 12 Days of Logos sale is back—and better than ever!

Each weekday through December 19, we’ll be placing a new item on sale. We’ve got a great lineup this year, and these prices won’t last long—don’t miss out! Head over to 12DaysOfLogos.com, sign up for the email list, and stay up to date on each day’s deal.

Today, the Word Biblical Commentary is on sale for 21% off—that’s up to $150 off the regular price!

The WBC delivers the best in biblical scholarship from some of our time’s leading scholars, emphasizing a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. Don’t miss out—use coupon code 12DAYS2013 and get it today.

XL_Master_BundleNew and improved bundles at 50% off

We’ve redesigned our topical bundles and, through January 6, marked them down by 50% (or more!). Each bundle includes all the resources from last year’s version, plus tons of new content. This means that if you already own a bundle, with Dynamic Pricing, you’ll save even more than 50%. For example, if you already own the XL Master Bundle, you’ll get 62% off the newest version!

Don’t wait, though—on January 7, all bundles will double in price. Get yours today.

Logos 5, special 12 Days deals, bundles on the topics you care about—this Christmas season, invest in the best for yourself and your loved ones. Take advantage of Christmas deals before prices go up!

Free Book: Horatius Bonar’s How Shall I Go to God?

how-shall-i-go-to-godAll December long, get Horatius Bonar’s How Shall I Go to God—free!

“In religion faith does not spring out of feeling, but feeling out of faith. The less we feel the more we should trust. We cannot feel right till we have believed.”
—Horatius Bonar

Who was Horatius Bonar?

Horatius Bonar (1808–1889) was a renowned author who came from a long line of ministers in the Church of Scotland. After graduating from the University of Edinburgh in 1838, Bonar was ordained and became pastor of the North Parish, Kelso, where he remained for 28 years. He joined the Free Church of Scotland after “the Great Disruption” of 1843, and in 1853 he earned a doctor of divinity from the University of Aberdeen. In 1867, he took over ministry duties at Chalmers Memorial Church in Edinburgh, and in 1883 he was elected moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland.

A prolific author and “the Prince of Scottish hymn writers,” he wrote and edited numerous books, biographies, articles, poems, and tracts, plus over 600 hymns, including:

  • “I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say”
  • “Blessing and Honour and Glory and Power”
  • “Thy Way, Not Mine, O Lord”

In “How Shall I Go to God?” Bonar explores happiness, hope, prayer, death, and more. Bonar offers unique and interesting perspectives on life’s oldest questions.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download Bonar’s How Shall I Go to God. Then enter to win the 47 vol. Life and Works of Horatius Bonar before the end of December!

Why I Love Working at Logos: Evan Washkow

Evan WashkowIt’s not just the environment that makes a great workplace; it’s also the people.

Logos is not so much an employer as it is a collector of talented people who love what they do. To me, that’s the most exciting and important thing about working at Logos. Every day, I’m excited to go to work—to hang out with my work buddies, learn new coding techniques, crunch out some amazing web pages, and sometimes even play in a Super Mario Smash Brothers competition.

No drama, no mystery

I think the best thing about Logos’ core values is that there’s no drama, no mystery, no “Oh, what’s so-and-so thinking?” going on in the back of my mind. Everyone is open and honest. Because of that knowledge, I can go confidently from task to task, be myself, ask questions, and even have the freedom to push back on projects that “aren’t quite right.” Most of all, I appreciate the honest feedback that helps me grow as an individual.

In fact, this open and honest atmosphere helps everyone grow together, as a team. Each of us has their own strengths and weaknesses. When we’re open about them, we realize who we are, who we’re not, and also who our teammates are and are not. With this understanding, we get things done quickly by deferring to those who know more than us, and those more experienced individuals take the time to help us grow. Admitting that “I don’t know” is the first step to knowledge; the second is knowing how to find the answers. The atmosphere at Logos helps me to do just that, and as a result, I’m constantly growing and learning.

A fun work environment

Logos is also a fun place to work! Imagine limitless soda, limitless espresso, food-truck stakeouts in the summer, air hockey, ping-pong, Nerf wars, foosball, and gaming tournaments at the office—that’s Logos. We get a lot of work done each day, and we have a blast doing it. All these options (and more) help me work harder, longer, and faster—and help me enjoy my job that much more. They’re just kind of the cherry on top that makes my job feel fun, special, and important.

Logos has done more than just collect talented people. It’s succeeded in creating an atmosphere of growth and community: we’re encouraged to work hard and have fun!

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We’re hiring awesome people. Check out Logos.com/Careers today!

10 Humbling Quotes on Thankfulness

Thankfulness QuotesThanksgiving is a time to get together with our closest friends and family, reflect on our blessings, and enjoy conversation over a delicious communal meal. It’s a time to thank God for every little thing he’s given us—and, hopefully, a time to remember how important it is to be thankful year-round.

Here are 10 quotes that remind us of the importance of giving thanks:

1. “If anyone would tell you the shortest, surest way to all happiness and all perfection, he must tell you to make a rule to yourself to thank and praise God for everything that happens to you.” —William Law, A Serious Call to a Devout and Holy Life

2. “The Christian’s life should be one of thankfulness to God.” —Charles Spurgeon, The Treasury of David, vol. 5

3. “We do not always know what is right. It is not always clear whether or not we should move. What we should say is not known in every situation. But there is one word which should never be far from our lips. It is ‘thanks’ (1 Thess. 5:18).” —Wayne Detzler, Living Words in Philippians

4. “Gratitude has a big job to do in us and our hearts. It is one of the chief ways that God infuses joy and resilience into the daily struggle of life.” —Nancy Leigh DeMoss, The Quiet Place

5. “It’s hard to give thanks for the consequences of evil. Gratitude in bad circumstances goes counter to our natural inclinations. But we are told to give thanks under every circumstance of life (Eph. 5:20).” —Al Detter, Nelson’s Annual Preacher’s Sourcebook

6. “The verbal utterances concerning Thanksgiving Day are mostly focused on visiting friends and loved ones, and of course, eating a bountiful turkey dinner. Yet without the biblical precedent of God’s people giving thanks, along with the example of the Pilgrims, we would not have this noteworthy holiday.” —Alvin J. Schmidt, How Christianity Changed the World

7. “Truly, we have much to thank God for, but if we would be thankful, we must set our hearts to do it with a will. We grumble and complain without thought, but we must think to give thanks.” —Samuel Logan Brengle, Take Time to be Holy

8. “Don’t complain when you’re in bad circumstances; cultivate a heart of thankfulness instead. If you’re not a thankful person, it’s because you think you deserve better circumstances than those you currently have. But if you got what you deserved, you’d be in hell. That goes for all of us. So be thankful for whatever God gives you. That will take all the sourness out of your life.” —John MacArthur, The Master’s Plan for the Church

9. “Thanklessness is a terrible disregard of God’s goodness.” —Lynn Garder, What the Bible Says about Suffering

10. “As we walk by the seashore, gaze in wonder at the stars, or smell the fragrance of a flower, we are to sense God speaking to us through His creation. And, seeing Him, we are to worship and give thanks.” —Larry Richards, The 365-Day Devotional Commentary

Spend today thanking God, but don’t let it stop there. Thanksgiving is more than just a holiday; it’s an ongoing state of praise and thankfulness for the many blessings in our lives.

Study the Old Testament with Logos Mobile Education

Knox Logos

Earlier this year, the era of Logos Mobile Education began with the Pre-Pub release of the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle. Mobile Ed brings the professors, the library, the visual demonstrations of software features, and the online classroom community directly to you—on your desktop, laptop, or mobile device. It’s education where you are.

The Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle includes nine courses, several of which acquaint you with how the Bible presents a strategic, epic story in an intelligent, deliberate way. One of these courses is OT101: Introducing Old Testament; Its Structure and Story.

What will I learn in OT101?

OT101 traces the epic history of God’s activity with humanity through his people, Israel, by focusing on the major themes of those Old Testament books that narrate Israel’s history from the call of the patriarch Abraham through the return from exile. Genesis through 2 Kings, 1–2 Chronicles, Ezra, and Nehemiah were originally written to capture this history and tell the theological story behind the events. The content of OT101 is not verse-by-verse exposition, but instead the important topics and threads that run throughout Israel’s story, showing how each book contributes to the Old Testament’s presentation of God’s plan to establish a people and kingdom.

Scholars divide this biblical history and its literary presentation into two sections: the Primary History (Genesis through 2 Kings, minus Ruth) and the Chronicler’s History (1–2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah). Consequently, OT101 proceeds as follows:

I. Understanding Narrative Structures

II. The Primary History

  • The Concept
  • Genesis: Blessing for the Nations
  • Exodus: Rescue and Relationship
  • Leviticus: Holiness
  • Numbers: Human Failings and Divine Faithfulness
  • Deuteronomy: Loyalty and Love
  • Joshua: Inheriting the Promise
  • Judges: The Need for a King
  • Samuel: The Rise of the Kingdom
  • Kings: The Demise of the Kingdom

III. The Chronicler’s History

  • The Concept
  • Chronicles: Experiencing Restoration
  • Ezra/Nehemiah: Building God’s House

Take the next step—or get started—on your journey to greater biblical and theological knowledge today with the Bible and Doctrine Foundations bundle.

A Place for Hope: An Interview with Dr. Gregory Jantz (Part 2)

Dr Gregory JantzRecently, Logos had the opportunity to speak with author Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of A Place for Hope, a treatment center in Seattle for individuals struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, and other life challenges. This is the second part of a two-part interview—if you missed part one, catch up here.

Dr. Jantz, we currently have eight of your books in the Logos format, including Controlling Your Anger Before It Controls You. What can you tell us about anger? Is anger healthy or unhealthy to feel and express?

While planning this book, I realized I could exchange the word “anger” with the word “hurt.” Many times, we feel hurt and don’t know what to do with it, so it turns into anger. This book explains how to address our hurt before it becomes anger. Otherwise, the next stage is resentment, then bitterness. It creates an embittered spirit within us without our even realizing what’s occurring. [This embittered spirit] then leads to other issues, such as depression and addiction.

According to your book Healthy Habits, Happy Kids, how has culture affected interactions within families?

Culture has changed the act of sitting down to have a meal together, and that has nutritional consequences. Now we’re accustomed to this instant, fast-food culture, and even when families do sit down at the dinner table, it’s condensed because everyone is used to going so fast. Conversation is short because phones are out and texting goes on at the dinner table—that’s a problem.

You have two books that go together, Every Woman’s Guide to Managing Your Anger and Battles Men Face: Strategies to Win the War Within. What are the differences between men and women when it comes to dealing with internal struggles?

Women have a stronger tendency to internalize hurt and anger. Once internalized, that hurt and anger are transformed into something else. It may be depression; it may be an eating disorder. Men often deal with their anger more outwardly, perhaps through sports or some physical way of acting out.

In your book How to De-stress Your Life, what sources and solutions do you identify?

People become stressed, but they keep going and going. Then they become burned out, stop sleeping well, stop eating nutritiously, and yet still keep going. The final stage of stress hits, which is whole emotional exhaustion. This is the man in my office saying, “Dr. Jantz, it takes energy just to breathe.” The solution to this is to start administering self-care.

What does that self-care look like?

It’s dealing with the three deadly emotions: anger, fear, and guilt. A person who’s emotionally healthy knows not only how to manage those three, but also how to bring about a healthy response. They don’t injure themselves or others when they’re angry; they go to their faith when fear arises.

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All these titles are available in the Gregory Jantz Collection, currently on Pre-Pub for 25% off. Get yours before prices go up!

Advance Your Bible Study with Lexham Press

Lexham-Press-logo_Black_1000x588Logos Bible Software just moved all of its original content under the imprint of Lexham Press. Lexham Press provides biblical content to advance scholarship and equip the church. We create digital-first Bible study resources, scholarly works, and Bible Study Magazine. Our designed-digital content never goes out of date because we continuously update it.

Here are four ways Lexham Press advances your Bible study.

Study the Bible

Lexham Press publishes the Bible in its original languages and literal, English translations. With thousands of explanatory notes, you can read the Bible through the lens of the translators. Our digital editions of the Bible in its original languages are morphologically tagged; behind each one is research that capitalizes on over 20 years of Bible technology developed by Logos Bible Software. See how we can improve your Bible study.

Interpret the Bible

Whether you’re a scholar or new to Bible study, Lexham Press helps you interpret the Bible. Our products simplify the process of learning and speed up research. We also provide original translations of historical theology, present the work of top theologians in elegant formats, and publish original research. Increase the efficiency of your Bible research.

Preach the Bible

Freeing up a pastor’s time benefits the entire church. Often, time is lost finding that perfect quote or prayer, designing a slide, or asking the right interpretation questions. Lexham Press gives the preacher back time by resolving these difficulties while making sermons more memorable and exciting. Free up your time with our pastoral content.

Apply the Bible

Lexham Press helps you apply the Bible—making the Bible more accessible and exciting. Our devotionals and application focused commentaries take full advantage of the technology of Logos Bible Software. Enrich your devotional time with our resources.

To advance your Bible study, speed up your sermon preparation, and help you find answers fast, we’re working with top Bible scholars from around the world, and employ a team of scholars and editors. We’re here to further God’s Kingdom with you.

Study, interpret, preach, and apply the Bible with Lexham Press. Check out the content catalog today at LexhamPress.com.

Stream Free Bible Art to Your Mobile Devices

Bible Screen

Bible Screen brings Scripture to life by streaming nonstop Bible verse art and animations straight to your computer, television, digital photo frames, tablet, or phone.

Featuring original artwork that plays with or without music, Bible Screen gives you all-day inspiration through one simple application.

Bible Screen is more than a screensaver—it’s a new way to share your faith. By streaming continuous biblical art in your home, church, classroom, or workplace, you can use Bible Screen to inspire yourself and others. Check it out:

Turn any screen into a digital photo frame

Bible Screen isn’t just for computers, Roku screens, and digital photo frames. With Bible Screen, you can turn any screen into a digital photo frame—even your tablet, iPhone, or Android device.

Why turn your phone and tablet off when you can use them to showcase your faith? While you’re charging your device, you can stream Bible text animations and Scripture art. When you’re at your desk, at a coffee shop, or with your loved ones, you can stream beautiful biblical inspiration. Wherever you are, Bible Screen is a great way to share and enjoy the Word.

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Start streaming free Bible art today: download Bible Screen for your iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire, or Android device.

3 Reasons to Attend Seminary

Today’s guest post is from Dr. Samuel Lamerson, professor of New Testament at Knox Theological Seminary.

I come from a fundamentalist background in which believers are often distrustful of higher education. On a number of occasions, I’ve had church members ask me, “Haven’t you been in school long enough?” or “Aren’t you afraid of coming out of school a liberal?”

This distrust of education has a social history in the US, and it’s still felt in certain denominations and areas of the country. If you’re not sure about higher education, why should you think about attending seminary?

I offer three reasons:

  1. Attend seminary because you are called. When the Lord has given us a task, he also equips us for that task. That is the very foundation of the Reformation view of “vocation.” If God has called you to be a teacher/preacher of his Word, it’s beneficial have proper training.
  2. Attend seminary because you recognize the need. Very few of us would feel comfortable being diagnosed by a physician who was “self-taught” with no credentials. The truth is that he or she might be a great doctor, but there is no way to be sure without proper testimonials. If we think that learning about the body is important for a physician, shouldn’t we also think that learning about the Bible is important for a minister?
  3. Attend seminary because you listened. One of the greatest gifts that I have been given in life is the counsel of wise brothers and sisters in Christ. Before you attend seminary, ask the advice of a few people who you trust. (Try to include at least one person who has attended seminary.) Listen carefully to what these counselors tell you. Often, those who are around us (our family, our close friends) know our gifts better than we do ourselves. Pay special attention to this advice, and weigh it against your own sense of calling.

I loved my time in seminary (at Knox and at TEDS). It was a wonderful season of growth and learning for me. The same may be true for you if you attend seminary for the right reasons.

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Learn more about earning your DMin from Knox Theological Seminary with Logos, and start furthering your education today.

Save Now When You Pre-order the Eerdmans Commentary Collection

Last Thursday, we announced an amazing partnership with Eerdmans—and, with it, the new Eerdmans Bible Reference Bundle, an enormous 309-volume library. You can still pre-order all this awesome content at Pre-Pub prices, and you can even spread out the payments with an interest-free payment plan.

There’s a lot of material in the Eerdmans Bible Reference Bundle. Over the next couple of weeks, we’ll be highlighting some of that brilliant content.

Eerdmans Commentary Collection (13 vols.)

If you’re looking for thoughtful, scholarly insight into the Scriptures, look no further than the 13-volume Eerdmans Commentary Collection. Written by the some of the most respected scholars in biblical studies, this collection will enlighten and inspire you for years to come.

Order it before Monday, December 2, to get the best Pre-Pub savings!

This collection includes:

1 & 2 Timothy and Titus by Robert W. Wall

“I commend Rob Wall for offering us, and the wider church, his canonical readings of the Pastoral Epistles. Rob does not shy away from the many tough passages in these letters, always trying to present what he sees as the ‘plain sense’ of the text in relation to other historical, ecclesial, and cultural understandings. The combination of commentary and reading by the ‘rule of faith’—supplemented by three interesting case studies—provides a thorough canonical understanding of these crucial letters from the standpoint of one who is immersed in what it means to understand the Bible as the church’s book.”
Stanley E. Porter, president, dean of theology, and professor of New Testament, McMaster Divinity College

Mark: A Commentary on His Apology for the Cross, vols. 1 & 2 by Robert H. Gundry

“A major contribution to Markan scholarship . . . An indispensable resource for scholars, students, and pastors.”
John R. Kohlenberger III, lecturer, consultant, and adjunct instructor in Bible and biblical languages, Multnomah Bible College and Western Seminary

Matthew: A Commentary, vols. 1 & 2 by Frederick Dale Bruner

“This is the kind of commentary that I most want—a theological wrestling with Scripture. Frederick Dale Bruner grapples with the text not only as a technical exegete (although he also does that very well) but as a church theologian, caring passionately about what these words tell us about God and ourselves. Here he places his considerable teaching gifts at the service of the Christian community, caring as much about us as he cares about the text. His Matthew commentary is in the grand traditions of Augustine, Calvin, and Luther—expansive and leisurely, loving the text, the people in it, and the Christians who read it.”
Eugene H. Peterson, emeritus professor of spiritual theology, Regent College

A Commentary on Micah by Bruce K. Waltke

“No one knows the prophecy of Micah more thoroughly than Bruce Waltke. No one is more deeply ingrained in the secondary literature that discusses and debates this prophet. No one is better positioned to be a helpful guide to the correct interpretation and application of this marvelous book. It’s rare when a commentary is helpful to scholars, clergy, and laypeople alike, but Waltke has accomplished this masterfully.”
Tremper Longman III, Robert H. Gundry Professor of Biblical Studies, Westmont College

Right now, you can pre-order the 13-volume Eerdmans Commentary Collection on its own and save over $70, or pre-order it as part of the 309-volume Eerdmans Bible Reference Bundle and save $1,000. But hurry: both Pre-Pub prices go up Monday, December 2!