Archive - Company RSS Feed

Meet the Staff: Roberto Haskell

In this video, Rob explains some of the programs he worked on for the Spanish department of Logos, including the Spanish affiliate program.

Windows Media (1.7MB) | Quicktime (2.2MB)

It’s Here!

The Bible Road Trip Bus has arrived!

When I turned the corner onto Commercial Street yesterday morning, I had to slow down and gawk at a very large, decked-out RV parked in front of Logos.



I’m pretty sure the gawking will continue once this thing is on the road. It’s amazing.



Starting May 1, the Bible Road Trip Bus will begin its nationwide tour, spreading the word about Logos Bible Software 3. Before long, it will pull into a church or school near you. So make sure to sign up for a Bible Road Trip event.
You don’t want to miss the bus!

Meet the Staff: Guillermo Powell

Guillermo Powell heads up the Spanish department at Logos, which is responsible for creating and promoting our Spanish language products to North America and the world. Guillermo was also the subject of a recent post about his trip to Perú.

Did you know that we offer a growing number of Spanish language collections, a Spanish toll-free order line — (800) 570-5400, a Spanish website complete with product demos in Spanish, Spanish support articles and training articles? Well, now you know.

Windows Media (2.1MB) | Quicktime (2.8MB)

Bible Road Trip – Hosts Wanted!

You convinced us! We have decided to do a four-month, 13,000 mile road trip to 60 cities to introduce Logos Bible Software 3.

We have developed a route and schedule, and we know which cities we’ll be in on which day.
…Oh, and we have a Bible Road Trip Bus!


The Bible Road Trip page at Logos.com has the schedule and a larger picture of the Bus.

Now that we have dates and cities, we need to identify host venues that are willing and available on the specific date when we will be in the area.

If you are near one of the cities we are visiting and willing to help host, please fill out a brief survey to provide some specific details about your location. The list of cities and a link to the survey are on the Bible Road Trip homepage.

I apologize if the schedule does not include your city (or your “greater metropolitan area” — we don’t need to be within the city limits). We tried to pick the areas that would let us meet the most users in the time available. (May through August.)

We look forward to meeting you in your town!

Logos Roadshow

The next release of Logos Bible Software is very cool! If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you know that we’ve been beta testing Libronix DLS version 3.0, and have been spilling the beans about various features here on the blog.

In fact, we are so excited about the next release that we want to come and show it to you personally once it is ready to ship.

What do you think…is this a good idea? Please help us decide by answering our simple Logos Road Show survey.

Your feedback will help us decide to visit your city.

Space Walk at Logos

Our guest blogger today is Dale Pritchett, co-founder of Logos Bible Software. And my father. But not in that order.

When I got back from the SBL meeting in Philadelphia I had this sense that Logos Bible Software had changed in some substantial but indefinable way. The demonstrations and conversations were of a different nature than the past. We have always demonstrated new titles and new features at conferences but yet somehow this year felt very different. As more and more people asked about my experience at the conference I began to sense why this conference was different. We at Logos had taken our first “space walk”.

Logos Bible Software has changed a lot over the years but it has always followed a simple formula of better and better computer enhancement of familiar manual tasks. You work with a paper library, you work with a digital library; familiar tasks refined and enhanced through innovative software. And now there is Logos Bible Software 3.0 and suddenly it is like “Star Trek” going where no man has gone before. It is like the first time man walked in space. There was no earthbound walking experience with which it could be compared. Space walking is a whole new experience with its own rules, equipment, challenges and rewards. This is the analogy I was looking for. Logos Bible Software 3.0 is like your first space walk.

For the first time, the software is not mimicking a manual process. There is no print-based equivalent to our new syntactical databases. There is no published printed edition of a Greek, Hebrew or English text with every clause identified and tagged. There are no preachers, teachers or Bible students searching for “functional” relationships as opposed to “form or morphological” tags. We have never had the ability to look up in a book, or for that matter, a Bible software program, the answer to the question, “Who or what is the object of God’s love?” Not only is such a functional search now possible, the results, though derived in the original languages, may be displayed in English as well as Greek and Hebrew. The amazing thing to me is that the most complex linguistic functionality that has ever been featured in Bible software will have immediate practical value to the English Bible student through the use of reverse interlinear Bibles which allow Greek and Hebrew search results to be accurately displayed in English, Spanish or any Bible for which we have a reverse interlinear edition.

This is a space walk.

The challenge ahead will be to describe the new features in Logos Bible Software 3.0 without the comforting analogies to manual systems. In trying to explain syntactical data bases to a user the other day I suggested that viewing syntax was like seeing the Bible in sentence diagrams with exposed subjects, verbs, objects, indirect objects, etc. Searching syntax would be like having the ability to circle a section of the diagram and look for other matching structures with or without the words attached to the diagram. That’s my best attempt so far in describing the concept. I will keep looking for analogies that help. This is the problem of space walking.

Spanish Dividends

It costs so much to build English-language tools and, incrementally, so little to enable them for other languages that it seems a waste not to do so.

Our large investment in the large English-speaking market should pay dividends around the world, not just here in the US. Building a multi-lingual technology like the Libronix DLS enables that, but users still need Bibles and reference works in their own language.

We’re working on acquiring licenses to those resources, but it is a slow process made all the more complicated by multiple ownership: a Spanish reference work may be a translation, by a Spanish publisher, of an English work, but the translator only owns the print rights and the electronic rights remain with the English publisher, who doesn’t own the translation. (We are working through this, though, and getting results.)

Years ago Logos funded the development of a complete set of biblical Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek lexicons by James Swanson. Controlling the rights as well as high-quality XML source files allowed us to have this Dictionary of Biblical Languages translated into Spanish at a reasonable cost without having to re-do all the tagging and linking. The translators started with the well-tagged English source files and only translated the English, ensuring that the original languages text and extensive links to other resources remained intact.

The Greek dictionary has been translated, and we hope the other volumes will follow soon. Look for it in an upcoming Spanish release.

English:

787 ἄρτιος (artios), ία (ia), ον (on): adj.; ≡ Str 739; TDNT 1.475—LN 75.4 qualified for a function; capable (REB), efficient (NEB), proficient (NRSV), competent (NAB), (2Ti 3:17+), note: many versions use vocabulary that emphasizes the thoroughness or completeness of the equipping; thoroughly (NIV), fully (NJB), complete (ASV, RSV, NKJV), perfect (KJV)

Spanish:

787 ἄρτιος (artios), ία (ia), ον (on): adj.; ≡ Str 739; TDNT 1.475—LN 75.4 calificado para una función, capacitado (RVA, NVI), eficiente, eficaz, preparado (RVR, DHH, TLA), equipado (LBLA) (2Ti 3:17+), nota: muchas versiones usan un vocabulario que enfatiza la meticulosidad o totalidad de la preparación; minuciosamente, completo, perfecto

Time for an Introduction

Hi. My name is Rick Brannan, and I’m one of the newly-minted Logos bloggers.

I’ve worked for Logos for 12 years (wow … that’s primary and secondary school combined!) and will start year 13 in August. I work in the Design and Editorial (D&E) department. D&E is focused on making tools for scholars to produce new data sets, and producing those data sets for use in Logos Bible Software.

My role in D&E is mostly comprised of stuff having to do with Greek. That means I’m the lucky guy who gets to work on stuff like:

And a bunch of other stuff I can’t quite tell you about yet. It’s safe to say that Bob is doing his best to keep me busy! But if you keep reading the Logos Bible Software Blog (tell your friends!) or aggregate the RSS feed, I just might slip up and tell some secrets before we make public announcements of things.

In related news, some of you may know that I do keep a personal blog called ricoblog. I’ll still continue to blog there, though stuff having to do with Logos Bible Software will be posted here instead of at ricoblog.

Thanks for reading! I’m looking forward to blogging for Logos, and hope these entries will be helpful to your study of God’s Word and your use of Logos Bible Software.

Welcome

Welcome to the Logos Bible Software Blog!

A number of Logos employees have been maintaining their own blogs for the past few years, posting on subjects ranging from awful music to biblical Greek to injured toes, but we wanted to provide a single site where you could find all of our posts related to Logos Bible Software.

Look for an introductory post from each Logos employee who posts here, and be sure to check out their personal blogs, too.

Our goal is to make Logos more open and accessible and to improve our communication with you. Please join us in the process: ask questions, make suggestions, and tell us how we can serve you better.

Update: Read introductions from Logos bloggers Bob Pritchett, Rick Brannan, Eli Evans, Daniel Foster, and Phil Gons.

Page 22 of 22« First...10«1819202122