Calling All Worship Leaders!

As we get closer to releasing Proclaim, we’re already working to make the most intuitive church presentation software even better! Of course, one of the keys to doing this is getting insights straight from worship leaders themselves.

If you’re a worship leader, please take this quick survey. Not only will you help make a great tool better, you’ll also be able to try Proclaim free for a month.

As an added incentive, one worship leader who responds will win a year of Proclaim for their church—absolutely free! 

If you’re not a worship leader, make sure you tell your worship team or pastor about this opportunity. They don’t want to miss this opportunity to help shape the future of church presentation software, and they’ll be blown away when they experience what Proclaim can do for their worship services! Share this post with any worship leaders you know by tweeting it, “Liking” it, or sending them the link in a quick email.

Take the survey, then leave us a comment and let us know what excites you most about Proclaim Church Presentation Software!

Great Greek Resources in Community Pricing

More and more Logos users are discovering the astronomical savings that can be found in the Community Pricing program. Just a couple of weeks ago, hundreds of users jumped in to bid on The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges (57 vols.) and ended up getting the massive collection for $50—less than a buck a book! Now that users pushed that collection over the line, its “twin” collection, the Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges is steadily creeping up in bids—and down in price.

This collection features twenty-one classic commentaries on the New Testament in Greek followed by detailed and insightful outlines, verse-by-verse interpretation, historical facts, doctrinal discussions, word studies, and more. For anyone learning Greek, these commentaries are a great place to start utilizing those new skills. For those already comfortable with the language, these classic commentaries offer solid exegesis from trusted scholars such as Alfred Plummer, H. C. G. Moule, F. W. Farrar, George Findlay, and more.

New to Community Pricing this week is the Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (21 vols.), otherwise known as “Meyer’s Commentary.” Also focused on the Greek language of the New Testament, Meyer’s commentaries were praised as “marvels of patient, laborious research,” “simply unrivalled,” “invaluable,” and “something like exegetical genius.” These commentaries are over 100 years old, but still referenced by contemporary scholars. Plugging Heinrich August Wilhelm Meyer’s name into my search bar of Logos 4 brought up over a thousand hits!

If you know Greek, are learning Greek, or one day plan on studying Greek, these are resources that you’ll want to bid on today—you just can’t beat the prices found in Community Pricing.

We are constantly adding new titles in Community Pricing, and as more users discover these great deals, the faster these titles will cross the 100% mark. Using the sorting menu on top of the main Community Pricing page, be sure to select “Progress” to see which titles are gearing up to cross-over next.

Still have questions about Community Pricing? Check out this FAQ page, ask your question in the always helpful Logos forums, or leave them in the comments section!

Have you been the recipient of a great Community Pricing deal? Tell us about it!

Forum Week Round-Up

In case you’ve missed it, the Logos forum community is in its final few days of Forum Week, a week of celebrating reaching the 50,000-user milestone. It’s been a unique week of great sales and tons of fun!

If you’re thinking, “The words forums and fun can’t possibly go together,” you probably not be too familiar with the Logos forum community in general and you’ve definitely missed out on Forum Week in specific.

So far this week, we’ve:

  • played some games,
  • gotten a glimpse into the lives of other forum users (marble collectors, collapsed-parachute survivors, et. al.),
  • given away hundreds of dollars in prizes,
  • offered tens of thousands of dollars in deals,
  • hid an as-of-yet-undiscovered Easter egg,
  • and more!

Don’t miss out on all the action! Head over to the Forum Week forum and look around before it’s over. The festivities end midnight Sunday!

Here’s all you need to do to take part:

  1. Sign in to your Logos.com account. (If you don’t already have your free account, get one here!)
  2. Visit the forums.
  3. Click on the forum at the top called “***Forum Week***”.
    Note: If you’re not logged in, this forum won’t be visible.
  4. Browse the top few posts to get up to speed.

If you’ve already been enjoying Forum Week, what’s been your favorite thing (or “random user fact”) about the forums so far? Let us know in the comment section.

Community Pricing: How Low Can it Go?

The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges (57 vols.) is nearing the 60% mark in Community Pricing at $50.00. That’s less than a buck a book. And guess what? The more people that bid on it, the lower the price can go. How low? That’s up to Logos users. The Community Pricing Program gives you a direct influence on the priorities and prices for all the resources in Community Pricing!

With contributors such as Herbert Edward Ryle, S. R. Driver, J. Skinner, A. Plummer, F. W. Farrar, H. C. G. Moule, W. H. Simcox, and more, The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges (57 vols.) won’t remain in Community Pricing for long. With 57 volumes of commentary covering the entire Bible, insight from dozens of well-known theologians and biblical scholars, helpful maps, indexes, appendixes, and outlines for each book of the Bible—the 14,000+ pages that make up The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges will be referred to in your Bible study again and again. Just a basic search through Logos 4 of some of these top names brings up thousands of hits—these trusted scholars are still being relied on after more than a generation.

So what are you waiting for? The Community Pricing Program brings classic works together with the power of Logos at a steep discount. Make sure you get your bid in for The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges (57 vols.) before it crosses over the 100% mark.

Be sure to check out the Community Pricing FAQ for any questions you might have. If you still have questions, leave us a comment or raise them in the forums—there are plenty of Logos users who would love to sing their praises about about the benefits of Community Pricing!

Classic Works—Amazing Deals

Warning!!

You may be in danger of missing out on some of the best deals Logos has to offer through our Community Pricing page if you don’t act soon! Some of our most exciting Community Pricing offerings are getting close to the finish line—you need to jump on these prices before it’s too late! Check out these titles that are too good to pass up:

And don’t miss out on these titles which need to be bid on by this Friday at 12:00 PM (PST):

That’s right! These six offerings have crossed the 100% mark and will be moved to the Pre-Pub page after this Friday at noon (PST).

And Don’t forget: with more bids, these prices can only go down! So place your bid, then spread the news. Hit the Facebook Like button on the top of each page. Push for them in the forums. Write about them on your personal blog—anything to alert others about the amazing deals on these classic works. If you have already placed a bid on one of these awesome works, tell others why you are excited about them in the comments section.

Turning Logos Blog Comments into Conversation

blog/forumYesterday, we ran a blog post by Stephen Smith on what an incredible resource the Logos forums are. With over 40,000 users, the forums provide a strong community that is both informed and helpful. It doesn’t matter if you are looking for information about a particular resource, assistance with an aspect of Logos 4, or just good tips and tricks to help get the most out of your study time, the Logos forums are an exceptional tool.

We recently realized how the Logos blog might be strengthened when combined with the community on the Logos forums. By moving the comments from the blog to the forums, users get the benefit of turning an isolated comment into a conversation. Now you can join thousands of users in discussing the various resources, tips, and general information discussed on the Logos blog!

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The #1 Tool for Getting the Most out of Logos Bible Software

ForumHave you ever wondered how to set up a reading plan in Logos Bible Software? Or how to do a syntax search? Or how to compare different Bible translations? Or how to . . . .

Chances are, you’re not alone.

But did you know there’s a whole community of Logos users who have either already answered your questions or are literally available to help 24/7? And we’re not talking about vague help that leaves you more confused than you were before. We’re talking step-by-step instructions, screenshots, and creative tips. One user has even made a series of tutorial videos!

I’m not exaggerating in the slightest when I say you can get immediate help in the forums with just about anything.

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Discovering Logos at 30,000 Feet

AirplaneToday’s guest post is by Bethany Olsen, from the Logos Bible Software marketing team.

There are many ways to discover Logos Bible Software. Our Ambassador, Refer A Friend, and Academic Programs, as well as Facebook, Twitter, and Bible Study Magazine are just a few of the many mediums through which the word about our software gets out. However, few have a more unique story of stumbling—almost literally!—upon our software, than this customer who recently contacted us:

“I learned of Logos Bible Software on a flight back in April from Houston to Sacramento. Not from speaking to someone, but by seeing it through the seat in front of me. It’s amazing how God can use just two inches to help further change a man’s life. I could see with just those few glimpses that it was a life changing software.”

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Let Logos 4 Read the Bible to You

AudioToday’s guest post is from David Lemmons, one of the wonderful contributors on the Logos Forums.

I am a relatively new user of Logos. I have upgraded to version 4 and I have been learning more about it daily—there is still so much more to learn. I subscribe to RSS feeds of the Logos forums and learn new things about how to use the program just about every day.

One of the ways I use the software each day is in my daily Bible reading. I have a rather ambitious reading plan which leads me to read the Old Testament every 90 days and the New Testament every thirty days. This means I read the entire Bible four times each year and the New Testament an additional eight times.

My old system of getting this reading done was to open Logos to my preferred Bible and enlarge the text to the largest setting possible . In order to do my reading more quickly (and I think also to help retention), I use audio files to read as I scroll. I began with a set of MP3 audio files containing the narration of Eric Martin which I purchased for about $20. I adjusted the tempo of these 1189 individual files (one for each Bible chapter) by using the software Audacity. Adjusting the tempo did not result in the chipmunk-sound, rather, the words were easily understood, but were coming twice as fast as the pre-adjusted files. This project took quite a long time and was arduous, but I knew that once I got them prepared I would use them daily, so I did it. Reading the files at this faster pace requires one to concentrate more on the text and I think this is a useful serendipity.

A couple of weeks ago I learned that the very same thing that I had spent several hours of my precious time working on had already been provided by Logos 4.

I am using Windows Vista. All I needed to do was go to Control Panel and open up “Text to Speech.” I selected the voice that sounded best to me: “Microsoft Anna.” I set the “Voice Speed Slider Scale” to two notches slower than the very fastest setting. Then I opened up Logos4 to my Home Page. My two reading plans are on the home page. I click on the day’s reading. I hit the keys, and Anna reads to me at accelerated speed until I stop her by hitting once again . The scrolling is done automatically by Logos.

My reading for today was 1 Chronicles 23–29 and John 7–11. I read this in 26:30 minutes. With Logos 4, and its wonderfully adaptable reading plans, ability to read to me at whatever speed I choose, to scroll automatically through the Bible text, being a more disciplined daily Bible reader is so much easier and so much more fun—I love it!

A New Kind of Biblical Scholar

Let Go and Let God? A Survey and Analysis of Keswick TheologyLast week we put a new book on Pre-Pub entitled Let Go and Let God? by Andy Naselli. From one perspective, it’s just another quality Christian book that we’re offering at a discount to everyone who pre-orders it. You, the community, get to vote on whether or not you want us to publish it, just like you do with most Pre-Pubs. (In this case, you’ve clearly voted yes.)

From another perspective, there is something worth highlighting. There’s a neat story that illustrates a changing tide.

Naselli relied heavily on Logos as he worked on his MA in Bible, PhD in Theology, and PhD in New Testament Exegesis and Theology. He’s so convinced of the benefits of having a digital library in Logos that he’s been aggressively building it and avidly promoting Logos to his professors, colleagues, and students through his reviews, research, blog posts, and word of mouth. He still purchases, owns, and uses print books, but in most cases it’s just because they aren’t yet available for Logos. So Andy’s first book is in large part the fruit of his research with Logos Bible Software.

But what’s special about Let Go and Let God? is not just that it was written by someone who does the vast majority of his research using Logos, but that its author decided that instead of publishing his first solo book in print, he’d rather publish it digitally with Logos Bible Software. He’s convinced of the value of Logos Bible Software, not just for his own research, but as a platform for helping others do research. He wanted his book’s readers to experience the same benefits he experienced while he was writing it.

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