Soup Cookoff Recipe #2: Pottage of Pollo Parousia

The runner-up in the 2005 Logos Soup Cookoff was Landon & Krissy Norton’s Pottage of Pollo Parousia.

Landon says: “By the way, the title of this tasty treat when translated by a team of our scholars overseas means: The Second Coming of Chicken Tortilla Soup.” His recipe is below.

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Soup Cookoff Recipe #3: Smakelijke Split Pea Soup

After posting this entry about our soup cookoff, some folks wrote in to request recipes.
I’ll post the top three over the next few days. We’ll start with the third-place soup, made by yours truly: Smakelijke Split Pea Soup.

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Logos Soup Cookoff 2005

The 2005 Soup Cookoff was a success! We had 16 different kinds of soup, all lined up and ready for our soup-slurping pleasure.

We have a tradition of voting on all of the soups, and giving awards to the top three vote-getters. Here they are:

Congratulations to new Logos Soup King Jerry Godfrey (in Logos Technical Support) for his awesome soup, “Grandma Approved”. I know I could taste that extra sweetness that only a Grandma can add … or was that the bacon?

Landon Norton, who works in Logos Ministry Relations, and his lovely wife Krissy turned in the second place effort, “Pottage of Pollo Parousia”. It was most delectable.

The third place slot is occupied by yours truly, the author of this post, Rick Brannan. I made a little soup I like to call “Smakelijke Split Pea Soup”. My Grandma, who was from Holland, used the word smakelijke to describe anything food-wise that was really, really tasty. Needless to say, the stuff that came out of her kitchen was always smakelijke! Apparently my soup was too.

All in all, it was a very good time. Next up: Logos Bake Off! It’s on November 4. Now I need to dust off my bakin’ skills so I can make something delectable for that one.

If you’re interested in some photos of the event, check out the extended portion of the post below.

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Mmmmmmmm … Soup!

Cook-offs are just part of working at Logos — one of my favorite parts. We do a Curry Cook-off sometime in the spring (April) and a Chili cook-off around July 4. If it is September, it must be time for soup! I’m not sure if the folks at Logos have realized it yet, but my favorite cook-off is always the next cook-off. That means as of now, my favorite is the Soup Cook-off.

Speaking of which, the Soup Cook-off is scheduled for September 16, and my soup is already made! (Made it on Tuesday night). I don’t know if it’ll win, but I do know it’ll be good. Even better, we have 15 soups scheduled to appear, and we may end up with even more!

If you’re into soup, stay posted. We’ll surely blog more about the Soup Cook-off, and may even have photos of the event to share.

Bob, Eli and Daniel (all of whom have entered, I believe), beware!

Tools, Options, KeyLink!

If you’ve been to one of Morris Proctor’s Camp Logos training seminars, then you’re familiar with the cry of “Tools, Options, KeyLink!”

I know I occasionally need a reminder of this, and chances are you may need a reminder too. Now is as good a time as any, especially since Eli’s recent blog entry about data types reminds me that facility with KeyLinking (how you look up stuff using data types) is something that effective users of Logos Bible Software seem to take for granted.

But knowing where to go to set your KeyLink preferences (once again, this time for Moe: “Tools, Options, KeyLink!”) is only half the battle. Understanding what happens when a KeyLink is invoked, and knowing a little more about the resources available for KeyLinking is necessary as well.

You might want to check out a few tutorials we have in the Support area of the Logos web site. These are listed in the order in which they were written. I wrote the Greek KeyLinking article to help folks understand what the different targets were and how KeyLink order affects lookup. A colleague then wrote the Hebrew KeyLinking article, and he followed that up with the English KeyLinking article. (If you haven’t figured it out, I’m a bit myopic when it comes to Greek!) All three articles have the same basic idea: understand the feature, know your resources, select your KeyLink order; but the each article applies the ideas to particular languages and available resources.

So, here are the articles:

Community Pricing: Adolf Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East

Since Bob has brought up the subject of Community Pricing, I figure it’s time to write about one of my favorite references that is (and has been) on the community pricing page: Deissmann’s Light from the Ancient East.

I can remember when I first started working through definitions in BAGD (the second English edition of Bauer’s lexicon, now superceded by BDAG). This was in the early to mid 1990′s. I’d just finished college, with a year of Greek under my belt, determined not to let it lapse. I’d asked my professor which books I needed, and he simply said “Get BAGD.” I went to the bookstore, and they ordered it — and told me it would be $70.00! I swallowed that pill, had them order it, and haven’t regretted it.

Because I’d spent that money, I used BAGD whenever I needed to look up a word — which was (and still is) frequently. And I soon noticed an oft-repeated abbreviation: LAE.

It only took me a few times to look that up in the abbreviation table (this was before the electronic edition was released by Logos) to associate it with Light from the Ancient East by Adolf Deissmann. It was cited frequently. I didn’t have a print copy, so I never bothered to look it up.

But I was the one missing out. Two or three years ago, I finally broke down and located a used print copy of LAE and dug in. I read it from cover to cover and soon saw that LAE contained excellent background information from papyri, inscriptions and ostraca. These materials are transcribed, translated and discussed. Photos or drawings exist for most materials, so you can actually see the item being discussed.

The discussions are the valuable part, from my perspective. Deissmann brings much to the table that can help one in examining infrequent New Testament words.

Allow me to present one example:
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More on Looking Up Citations: Pseudepigrapha

I blogged about looking up Philo citations in BDAG awhile back. But Philo (and even Josephus) aren’t the only potential targets you can work with.

There are a number of reasons to use pseudepigraphal writings (Greek or English or both) to supplement one’s study, though I think such reasons fall into two primary categores: cultural and linguistic. In this article I’ll focus a bit on the linguistic side of things (though I do venture into the cultural a bit), looking particularly at word meanings.

In my personal study, I like to look up cross-references when looking into word meanings. This is particularly handy if a word doesn’t occur often in the New Testament but does occur in other non-canonical writings. I was recently looking at 1Ti 3.8, specifically at the word ?????????????, which the ESV translates as greedy for dishonest gain.

The first thing, of course, was to look it up in BDAG. Here I found that it occurs 2 times in the NT, and both of these are in the Pastoral Epistles (1Ti 3.8 and Tt 1.7). Both contexts are the pretty much the same. But BDAG also cites instances of ????????????? in the Works of Philo (Sacr. Abel. 32) and in the pseudepigraphal Testament of Judah 16.1.
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Liddell-Scott-Jones (LSJ) as a complement to BDAG

I was all set to start to write a post about how I use LSJ as a complement to BDAG when I’m looking into word meanings in the Greek New Testament.

Then I realized I’d already written such a beast, and it’s been on our web site for awhile now. If you’ve been wondering why a lexicon that covers a large range of classical material (like LSJ) would be useful in studying either LXX or New Testament Greek, then you may want to check out the article.

And, if you’re interested, you can read an overview of how we (Logos) came to the decision to produce LSJ as a Logos book. In the process, you’ll learn a bit about how we take stuff from print to electronic via the Pre-Publication Program.

Opening Two Copies of the Same Book

I received the following comment regarding my post about Logos Workspaces:

I saw your post regarding your workspace in Libronix and I had a question: How do you open the same book twice? You did this for the ESV and I can not figure it out for the life of me. Any help would be wonderful. Thanks

I suppose this really isn’t prominently documented. But in Logos Bible Software, if you hold down the SHIFT key while clicking a link, you open a new version of the target resource.

So if you see a link for a Bible reference and SHIFT+Click the reference, a new version of your preferred Bible will open if you already have a copy open. This is very handy — it means you won’t lose your place in your primary Bible window (and any linked windows) by following bunny trails.

I usually keep a second version of the ESV open, and I also mark it as the Reference Target Window (the little red book icon in the book icon bar that has the arrow pointing to itself). That way, whenever I click a Bible reference, it will jump to that specific window — and not cause any of my other linked windows to jump around.

This SHIFT+Click logic carries to opening books in general. So if you’re in My Library and do the SHIFT+Click book-opening dance, you’ll open a new copy of the book you clicked.

It’s amazing what you learn when you write a blog article. A few folks here at the office read this one and told me I was missing out — that there are all sorts of ways to open another instance of the same resource.

Some of these ways to open another copy of the same book include:

  • Window | New Window will spawn a new instance of the current window.
  • CTRL + SHIFT + N will spawn a new instance of the current window.
  • I’ve been told that in future versions of the LDLS (currently in alpha testing) will support multiple opening in the “Go”/Quick Nav box. So if you type ‘ESV’ and then ENTER, then ENTER again, two instances of the ESV will open.

New International Greek Testament Commentary (NIGTC)

We’ve got a lot going on here at Logos (have you looked at our pre-pub page lately? Zowie!) but the one I’m most excited about is getting ready to ship: The New International Greek Testament Commentary, or NIGTC.

I’ve used Knight’s NIGTC volume on the Pastoral Epistles and it is consistently a great place to go when I’m confused as to what is going on in the Greek text.

One example where NIGTC helped me recently is given below.

I was looking into the creedal/hymn fragment in 1Ti 3.16, particularly the line that the ESV translates “vindicated by the Spirit”. The Greek for that line (NA27) is ????????? ?? ????????. I was wondering about the reason for assuming that ?? ???????? referred to the Holy Spirit as there was no article, which would normally be a clue. I agree with the reading that this refers to the Holy Spirit, but wanted to know the linguistic/grammatic reason.

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