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Greek Syntax: OpenText.org Word Groups

[Note: this is one in a series of posts on Greek syntax and Logos Bible Software. See the Greek category for a full listing. The immediately previous post is here.]

As mentioned in a previous post, the OpenText.org syntactic analysis consists of three primary levels of annotation:

  • Base Level Analysis (Word)
  • Word Group Analysis
  • Clause Analysis

This post will introduce you to the Word Group level of analysis. If this sort of stuff floats your boat, then read on.

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Greek Syntax, OpenText.org and Logos Bible Software

I introduced a series of posts on upcoming Greek Syntax tools last week. This is the second post (first post after the intro, you haven’t missed anything) in that series.

We have two different data sets that will be made available. If you’re at either the ETS or SBL conferences in November, you can see them demo’d. To keep my sanity (and yours) I’ll only discuss one data set at a time.

This first series of posts will discuss the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed Greek New Testament, as implemented within Logos Bible Software.

Interested in utilizing syntax within your study of the New Testament? Read on!

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Greek Syntax and Logos Bible Software

A few weeks back, Bob had a teaser post about work being done at Logos with Greek syntax.

Over the next few weeks, I hope for my Logos blogging to consist of more information regarding exactly what we’re doing in the area of tools to assist with Greek syntax.

It is all (at least to me) very cool. However, there’s a lot to it, and it doesn’t lend itself to a short explanation.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Keep posted, I’ll try to have an entry or two per week talking about these things to bring y’all up to speed.

Oh, yeah, one more thing: We don’t just have one data source for information regarding Greek syntax … we have two. They’re both different in philosophy and (I think) complementary. And we have a third source that presents the Greek New Testament as Clausal Outlines, which should be a great help in tracking themes and other stuff helpful in both exegetical and homiletical usage of the Greek New Testament.

So stay tuned.

Nobel Prize in Economics and Game Theory (at Logos!)

It all started innocently enough. I went for a cup of coffee on Monday afternoon at the Starbucks up the street. When I was there, they gave me a coupon for a free Pumpkin Spice Latte.

I like my coffee straight. No cream, no sugar, and certainly no “pumpkin spice”.

So, on my way back to the office, coffee in one hand and coupon in the other, I started thinking. Earlier that day, the Nobel Prize in Economics was announced. It went to some guys (Thomas Schelling and Robert Aumann) who did foundational work in Game Theory. (yes, I can be a bit of an econ geek … )

I had the brainstorm of giving away the coupon via Logos company email, but experimenting a little with game theory in the process. Read on if you’re interested …

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IVP’s Ancient Christian Commentary in LDLS Format

The Ancient Christian Commentary Series (ACCS) from InterVarsity Press is one of my favorite in-process commentary series.

The first installment of the electronic edition of the ACCS, known as Volume 1, is now available. Twelve volumes of patristic power, arranged like a commentary, at your fingertips. I’m pretty stoked about this one, it is like having a selected reference index to the church fathers.

These volumes have excerpts from fathers cited in the Schaff edition (which Logos also has available in its entirety), but they are by no means limited to that well of wisdom and insight. Other lesser-known fathers are quoted too. Many of the quoted materials are provided in new translations.

If you’re interested in looking into how the early church interpreted and applied Scripture, then you should consider how this set might help you in your study. More information is availble on the series at the ACCS web site.

Greek Pseudepigrapha is Closing In!

Greek OT PseudepigraphaI’m sure many readers of the Logos Bible Software Blog already know this, but Logos has been planning an edition of the Greek Old Testament Pseudepigrapha.

It has been listed on our Pre-Publication page for awhile. But the confirmed pre-orders don’t quite cover our costs yet. They’re so very close (check out the thermometer on the prepub page) but not over the line.

We generally like to make sure our estimated costs are covered before something moves from “Gathering Interest” status to “Under Development” status.

If you aren’t familiar with this material but have some familiarity with Greek and using Greek-English lexicons, then you might want to check this out. One primary benefit of having things like the Greek Pseudepigrapha available in your library is the ability to look up secondary citations in the primary language. Of course the pseudepigrapha are not useful for establishment of doctrine; but they are helpful for comparative word studies, studies of grammatical phenomena, and for understanding more about the religious culture of the day.

So, if you haven’t given this one a look-see yet, maybe you should. While the pre-pub price is still relatively low. Here are some pages with more information:

Update (2005-10-21): It has come to my attention that the Greek Pseudepigrapha pre-pub has “crossed the line” and is now “Under Development”. Thanks to all who have pre-ordered; we’ll do our best to get the work done and the resource to you as quickly as we can!

Speaking of the Early Church Fathers …

Reading Bob’s post and seeing the picture of Eli holding 37 volumes of the Church Fathers’ writings brings back memories.

I remember when we did the ECF project. That was Eli’s baby, and what an incredible job he did in pullling that thing together. I can recall helping his team out by proofing through Greek in footnotes to make sure it was actually correct. I think I may have even keyed some of the footnotes.

But what I remember most is the topical index.
Huh? You didn’t know that the 37-volume Logos Bible Software edition of the Early Church Fathers has a topic index? Well, it does. And that particular topic index doesn’t exist anywhere else.

This article looks back on how all that happened. Ahhhhhh … nostalgia!

It must’ve been 1996, but it sure doesn’t feel like it was that long ago. Eli and I were just figuring out what it meant to make electronic books, and were “kicking the tires” both with LLS resources and with our still-developing programming skills.
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Visual Filters and Verb Rivers (Part II)

Earlier, I wrote an article titled Visual Filters and Verb Rivers (Part I) in which I described the use of a particular visual filter, the Morphology Filter in the Biblical Languages Addin.

That article got long, and I promised to follow it up later. Well … it’s later. And this is the follow-up.
The Morphology Filter is good for word-level and paragraph-level work. That is, when you are reading through the text and noticing morphological trends, the Morphology Filter helps these sorts of things jump out at you.

Upon noticing what seems to be a concentration of a particular morphological criteria in a particular paragraph or section, the next question is: Does this happen elsewhere in the book, or is this unique? In other words, with the Morphology Filter, you’re looking at the trees (or perhaps a particular grove of trees). But you need to step back and look at the whole forest now. This is what Verb Rivers help you to do.

(Holding back the urge to mix metaphors and crack a joke about going “over the river and through the woods” … )

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Soup Cookoff Recipe #1: Grandma Approved!

The top vote-getter in our 2005 Soup Cookoff was Jerry Godfrey’s soup, Grandma Approved!
His prize-winning recipe is below.

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Visual Filters and Verb Rivers (Part I)

I’ve been working through 1Ti 4.11-16 in my personal study. One thing that jumps out in this passage is the amount of imperative verbs relative to 1Ti 1.1-4.10. These six verses contain 10 imperatives; nine of them are in the second person singular (thus likely addressed to the reader, Timothy).

This is an important feature of the passage (and in the larger discourse of the epistle), and it should be looked into.

But how does Logos Bible Software help you become aware of this sort of thing? There are two features (at least) that help one “see” these things. Visual Filters and Verb Rivers. These are available in the Biblical Languages Addin, which is already a part of some Logos packages (see bottom of this product page for details).

This article explores what sort of information these addins convey.
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