Sahidic Coptic. Why?

We’ve recently pre-pubbed a collection called the Sahidic Coptic Collection. I can hear the questions already:

  • Why worry about a language like Coptic?
  • What is Coptic, anyway?
  • How could that ever be useful?

I’m sure there are other questions along those lines. The short answer to them all is that the Sahidic Coptic editions of New Testament writings are very valuable for text-critical purposes.
Yes, I can see the eyes rolling now, but please, keep up with me. For at least a little longer.

You see, the Sahidic Coptic editions of the New Testament were some of the first translations from the Greek New Testament into another language. And because Coptic has much affinity with Greek (sharing the most of the same alphabet and even sharing many Greek words) those who know a little Greek (like me) can muddle through Coptic after spending time to learn the alphabet and some basic vocabulary.

The resources in the Sahidic Coptic Collection make this a little easier for the Coptic neophyte (that’s where I am) and the folks who are big-time into Coptic.

Because the Sahidic Coptic editions we have are likely very early, they provide an early glimpse into the texts they are translations of. And because most editions are extremely (almost woodenly) literal, they can provide insight into the underlying text — helping in the quest to “establish the text” which is one of the first steps in any serious exegete’s process.

So let’s take an easy example from John 1.28 and see what we can find.

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Zooming Syntax Graphs

Some syntax graphs are small. Others (e.g. Rom 1.1-6; Titus 1.1-4; Col 1.3-8) are huge.

Sometimes it’s nice to zoom in and out to get a picture of the whole structure, or the extent of the clause. And that can be hard to do using the zoom button in the toolbar.

But if you have a mouse with a scroll wheel and a control key … well, it’s pretty easy. And this video shows you how.

Now try it yourself: click here to open the OpenText.org Syntactically Analyzed GNT: Clause Analysis and get your zoom on.

Greek Syntax: Love in the Johannines

Most folks are very familiar with the first part of John 3.16, “For God so loved the world”. In the OpenText.org Clause Analysis, that phrase is a Primary Clause (PC), and the word translated “loved” (ἀγαπάω) is the Predicator (P) of the Primary Clause.

Now, if you wanted to find other situations where the underlying Greek word (ἀγαπάω) is used similarly, you could search the New Testament for all instances of ἀγαπάω. You’d find over 100 of them. Perhaps (as the below video assumes) you’re only interested in ἀγαπάω as it is used in the writings traditionally ascribed to John. You could search all of those out too; there are 72 of them (in 51 verses).

But if you did a syntax search and just looked for where a Primary Clause has ἀγαπάω as its predicator, you’d narrow your list down to 18 hits, and you’d know they’re used as the main verb in the primary clause.

Confused? That’s OK. I recorded a video showing all of this. It’s just under nine minutes long and is about 10.6 megs. Watch out, though, I’m getting over a cold so I’m a little congested.

Products Pages: What’s New?

If you’ve followed Logos for any amount of time, you know that we publish a lot of books electronically for use with the Libronix Digital Library System (LDLS).

You also probably know about pre-pubs and community pricing. But did you know we don’t always pre-pub books? Some books we just know will be received well, so we make them and release them.

Other times, you may just forget to check in to see what we’ve been up to.

No worries if you haven’t kept up to date. That’s why we have the New Products page. Here you can browse down the list and see the new things we’ve released recently. Cool stuff that even I hadn’t realized we’ve released recently, like:

I’m sure there’s more there that will float your boat. So check it out!

Soup Contest Recipe: Chuck’s Spicy Seafood Bisque

Chuck Brannan, my Dad and perennial soup fan, can’t be kept away from the soup cookoff. But that’s OK because he brings some mighty fine soup along with him when he comes.

This year, his Spicy Seafood Bisque placed on top. And count yourself lucky, he agreed to share his recipe. So here it is!

Chuck’s Spicy Seafood Bisque

1/2 c chopped sweet onion
1/2 c chopped celery
2 tbsp butter
4 c chicken broth
3 c tomato juice
1 14 oz. can diced tomatoes undrained (I used garlic and onion flavored)
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 tsp Old Bay Seafood seasoning
1 tsp dried oregano
1 tsp garlic powder
1/2 to 1 tsp hot pepper sauce (to taste)
1/4 to 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (to taste)
1 bay leaf
1/2 c small shell pasta (may use any small pasta)
1 lb uncooked med. shrimp (31-40 count)
2 6 oz cans crab meat or 12 oz dungeness crab meat drained, flaked, cartilage removed
1 lb white fish (such as true cod or halibut)
1 lb mussels in shell
1 lb small steamer clams in shell (such as Manila clams)

In a large sauce pan, saute onion and celery in butter until tender. Add broth, tomato juice, tomatoes, Worchestershire sauce and all seasonings. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer for 20 min.

Discard bay leaf, add pasta, cook uncovered until tender. Add shrimp, crab, and white fish. Cook until shrimp are pink. Add mussels and clams, cook until shells open. Remove from heat and serve with warm garlic bread. Yield 10-12 servings.

Soup Contest Recipe: Big Toe Baked Potatoe Soup

Naomi Boyer, project manager in the Logos Text Development department, graciously consented to allow her 2nd place soup recipe, Big Toe Baked Potatoe Soup, to be posted here on the Logos Bible Software Blog.

So … here’s the recipe, straight from Naomi!

Big Toe Baked Potatoe Soup

2/3 cup butter
2/3 cup flour
7 cups milk
4 large baking potatoes, baked, cooled, peeled and cubed, about 4 cups
6 green onions, thinly sliced
14 strips of bacon, cooked, drained, and crumbled
1 1/4 shredded mild cheddar cheese
1 cup (8 oz) sour cream
1 tsp. salt
3/4 tsp. pepper
1/2 tsp. chives

In a large Dutch oven or stockpot over low heat, melt butter. Stir in flour; stir until smooth and bubbly. Gradually add milk and raise to medium heat, stirring constantly, until sauce has thickened. Add potatoes and onions. Continue to cook, stirring constantly, until soup begins to bubble. Add bacon. Reduce heat; simmer gently for 10 minutes. Add remaining ingredients; stir until cheese is melted. Ideally, serve baked potato soup immediately.

Serves 6-8.

The trick to this soup is to have your husband do the “stirring constantly” part while he reads Leviticus and you chop up the rest of the ingredients. And also have the potatoes cooked well in advance to give them time to cool.

Original recipe gleaned (and slightly altered) from: http://southernfood.about.com/od/potatosoups/r/bl30324f_p.htm (Baked Potato Soup)

Logos Soup Contest 2006

Last Friday (Sept. 15) was Soup Cookoff Day at Logos. We blogged the soup cookoff last year and wanted to do something similar this year.
This year the winner was actually my Dad (!) who loves soup so much we can’t keep him away on soup day. Congrats to Dad and to the other winners:

  • 1st Place: Chuck Brannan with “Chuck’s Spicy Seafood Bisque”
  • 2nd Place: Justin & Naomi Boyer with “Big Toe Baked Potatoe Soup”
  • 3rd Place: Dave Kaplan with “Cheesy Chicken”

We had 20 soups this year. Your intrepid Logos bloggers didn’t fare so well in the contest. My soup, “Sweet Panang’d Squash” didn’t place; nor did Eli’s “Ye Olde Lentils”. I guess the Logos palatte wasn’t ready for squash & lentils. Maybe next year …
More photos of the day are below the fold, so check ‘em out!
Update: Several have asked about recipes. I’ll see if the chefs who created the top 3 recipes will allow their recipes to be posted on the blog.

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Here’s Something Nuevo … er, New

Last week, I posted about syntax searching for “fronted complements“.

Today, I ran the same search with a slight preference change. Here’s the result. Can you see what’s new in this screenshot?

What’s different here? (hint: the column on the right … )

Did you get it?

That’s right, the difference is that the syntax hits are highlighted in Spanish (the 1960 Reina Valera New Testament). Now, the Nuevo Testamento Interlineal Revertido Español-Griego: Reina Valera 1960 is still in development, but you can see how, even though it is Spanish, it just plugs right in and is useful in the same way as the ESV NT Reverse Interlinear.

Search hits work the same way:

Reverse Interlinear … with Spanish!

This was all done — again, on my computer here at the office because the resource has not been released yet — by switching my preferred Bible to the Reina Valera Revisada (1960).

Oh, yeah … we’re working on an RV1960 Old Testament Reverse Interlinear as well …

Hints on Reading the Logos Help Manual

In Logos Bible Software, context-sensitive help is available from dialogs or reports just by pressing the help button.
But sometimes you might just want to read the manual. And you can do that too, because the manual is a book in the system.
That’s right. Just go to My Library. Type in “help manual”. Hit enter or click on the title.
This is what is known as a non-scrolling book. It is a series of articles, each article is a separate “scrolling” region of text. Sort of like a series of web pages.
On books like this, it is handy to open up the Table of Contents Pane in the book window. Like below.

Just click the button, and the TOC Pane opens up. You can navigate the book this way. Or search it with the LDLS search engine. Set bookmarks so you can remember where you left off. It’s your choice.
Another Hint: Try the Locator Pane by clicking the button next to the TOC Pane button.

Syntax Search Example: Fronted Complements

Awhile back, I blogged on Sleepy Disciples. That blog post looked at the predicator (verb) προσεύχομαι and the different adjuncts that modified each of its occurrences in Matthew 26.
Looking at that passage again, I noticed the following embedded clause in the last adjunct in Mt 26.44:

In this embedded clause, the complement is the first thing in the clause. Some would say this is an instance of fronting, where there is non-standard (for narrative, anyway) component order.

It occurred to me that this sort of thing is now searchable, given a syntactic analysis of the text. So I created the below video which explains things a bit more and walks through setting up a syntax search that will locate fronted complements with a headword of λόγος — much like what occurs here in Mt 26.44.