Examine Biblical Themes with the Lexham Bible Guides

lexham-bible-guides-genesis-collectionIf you began your yearly Bible reading plan in Genesis last month, you’re likely almost done with the book—and you undoubtedly have some questions. This year, take your annual reading plan to a new level—a deeper level that answers those questions.

The Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection is the ideal resource to help you grow in your understanding of Genesis and the Bible as a whole. Genesis is the foundation for the rest of Scripture. Almost any biblical theme you can think of—from the Old Testament or the New—has a parallel in Genesis.

The Genesis Collection helps you examine those themes. It guides you through your own exploration of some of the Bible’s most difficult and significant passages. You’ll gain new insights into verses you’ve read countless times—and you won’t need to invest countless hours reading commentaries. We’ve done the research for you.

The Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection

  • Provides comprehensive, easy-to-use coverage
  • Unpacks difficult passages and makes them accessible for further study
  • Explains top scholars’ various opinions, and links you directly to those resources in your Logos library for further reading

The Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection

To extend your knowledge even further, order the three-volume Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection. Walk through the narratives of Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, and their families in eight-week studies that are perfect for sharing with small groups or your entire congregation.

The Patriarchs Collection:

  • Explores God’s unique relationships with imperfect people who grew to become champions of faith
  • Provides a rich learning experience for individuals, small groups, or entire congregations
  • Prompts reflection on how the lives of these early leaders hold lessons for us today

It’s not too late to make a new commitment to Bible study this year. Order the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection and the Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection today.

Get $100 Off the Lexham Genesis Collection

Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis CollectionDig deeper into the foundations of your faith, from creation through the lives of the patriarchs, with the Complete Genesis Collection, available now for $299.95—a 25% discount that saves you $100! This collection will only be available through December 2, the end of our Black Friday sale, so grab yours before it’s too late.

This collection includes both volumes of the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection and the three-volume set of Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection, Complete Church Curriculum.

Key features

The Lexham Bible Guides combine the expert curation of a Bible guidebook with the advanced technology of your Logos library. When time is short, you can quickly find what you need to grasp the basics of any passage. And when you have more time, you can turn to this same resource as your guide to in-depth study.

The collection:

  • Provides elegantly organized, comprehensive coverage that’s easy to use
  • Makes difficult and obscure passages accessible for teaching and further study
  • Annotates the differing opinions of top scholars and links you directly to their most relevant passages for further reading

The Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection, Complete Church Curriculum enables you to lead your entire church into a deeper study of the lives of the founders of your faith. This all-in-one curriculum offers resources for everyone in your congregation—pastoral staff, worship leaders, small groups, and others who want to continue their studies throughout the week.

  • Discover the relevance of the patriarchs’ lives by sharing how God grew these imperfect men into inspiring leaders of the faith.
  • Help your entire church get connected. Sunday school classes, small groups, worship and media teams, church members—all will enjoy a richer Sunday-morning experience thanks to study and presentation materials integrated into your sermons.
  • Get sermon outlines, small group lesson plans, introductory videos, sermon-outline and discussion-group handouts (available in PDF and Microsoft Word formats), and teaching slideshows (available in 16:9 and 4:3 aspect ratios for PowerPoint, Keynote, and Proclaim) that you can customize to fit your theme and your church.

Forget waiting in line at 4 a.m. to get the best deals of the season. Through December 2, curl up with your laptop and get $100 off the Complete Genesis Collection.

Exploring Paul’s Letter to the Galatians

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collectionAll pastors have an abiding love for the people of their congregation. The apostle Paul was no different. So when he heard news of false teachings in the Galatian church after his departure, he was compelled to write. Paul’s letter to the Galatians reveals his two greatest concerns: Theologically, that a person can be justified by faith and faith alone. Practically, that believers’ actions should stem from their freedom in Christ, which liberates them to treat everyone with love and respect since all—regardless of differences—have been accepted. Paul explores these concerns by discussing the authenticity of the Gospel, the connection between the Gospel and the Old Testament law and covenants, and the theme of Christian freedom from the law.

Galatians 5 serves as a wake-up call to the Galatian believers who were falling prey to false teachings and returning to a “yoke of slavery” (Gal. 5:1). To explore this, let’s take a look inside the Galatians volume of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection:

Issues at a glance

  • Severed from Christ
  • Will Not Inherit the Kingdom of God
  • The Fruit of the Spirit
  • Key Word Study: Katargeō, “To Abolish”
  • Key Word Study: Anastatoō, “To Disturb”
  • Key Word Study: Epithymia, “Desire”
  • [Read more...]

4 Ways to Improve Your Small Group

studies-in-faithful-living-patriarchs-collection-complete-church-curriculumSmall groups, no matter the size, always seem to have two people: the one who won’t stop talking and the one who sits in silence. It’s easy to encourage the conversation monopolizer to give others time to share.

But how do I inspire someone to participate? Creating a sense of trust is one step. But if the problem is a lack of engagement with the study material, my role as small group leader just got much more difficult. Researching and preparing a study each week is difficult in itself; finding creative ways to keep everyone engaged can be overwhelming.

Overcoming small group challenges

With these challenges in mind, we created the Studies in Faithful Living Series: Complete Church Curriculum. The collection explores the lives of Abraham, Jacob, and Joseph, with lessons that show how their faith journeys are relevant to ours today. Each eight-week study gives me everything I need to make leading a small group both easier and more dynamic. If I were leading a small group today, here is how I would use this series: [Read more...]

Get into Genesis with the Lexham Bible Guides

We all wish we could buy time, even just a few hours to get a project done. With the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, pastors can essentially do just that.

From creation through the patriarch narratives, the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection empowers you to interpret some of the most difficult and important chapters of the Bible. Both volumes prepare you to immerse yourself in passages you’ve read dozens of times—and walk away with entirely new insights.

The Lexham Bible Guides direct you to the best commentaries for the subject you’re researching. The Genesis Collection offers a complete introduction to each literary unit of the book, keeping you focused and helping you conduct more thorough research in a fraction of the time you usually spend hunting through commentaries on your own. You’ll also get an overview of the each passage’s structure, its place within Genesis and within the canon, major issues within the passage, key word studies, and an application to help you make this degree of research relevant for your faith community.

You already know that commentators hold a variety of views on God’s acceptance of Abel’s offering and not Cain’s. With the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, you’ll get an overview of those opinions, with definitions of original-language words and links to commentaries that explore each standpoint in depth. Take a look at an excerpt:

The Offerings of Cain and Abel

The reason God favored Abel’s offering and not Cain’s remains a matter of debate. Both men brought offerings related to their vocation. Some commentators contend that this passage reflects a preference for blood sacrifice. Others argue that the narrator gives no clues as to God’s preference for one offering over the other. This latter view regards God’s sovereignty and divine election as responsible. Another interpretation, based on Heb 11:4, suggests that God preferred Abel’s offering because Abel demonstrated a righteous motivation in worship where Cain did not. The most common view, however, explains that God rejected Cain’s offering because of its quality. Abel offered the “firstborn” (bekhorah) of his flock (Gen 4:4); Cain failed to offer the “firstfruits” (bikkurim) of his yield (Gen 4:2; compare Exod 23:19).

  • Walter Brueggemann calls God’s preference for Abel’s offering inexplicable and recommends that interpreters resist the temptation to explain what the narrator leaves unexplained. He argues that the freedom of God is the main point.
  • Kenneth A. Mathews contends that a flaw in Cain’s intention prompted God’s rejection. He argues that God rejected the integrity of the giver, not the nature of the offering.
  • John Skinner argues that God’s preference for Abel’s offering reflects a preference for animal offerings over vegetable offerings.
  • Bruce Waltke examines the interpretive options, concluding that God rejected Cain’s offering because Cain did not bring the best of his harvest, revealing that he was not dependent on God.

How much time would you have invested in finding these resources on your own? Why do the work when Logos has already done it for you?

When you purchase the two-volume Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection, Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 1–11 will download immediately. Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 will download when it is released. Get yours today!

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Explore the Life of Mary This Advent Season

There’s no better time of year to explore the life of Mary than now, as we head into the Advent and Christmas season.

The Gospels mention Mary in only a few verses, so we easily assume there’s not much to learn about her life. Yet she was present as a silent witness and guiding force throughout Jesus’ early years, she was with him at the foot of the cross, and she continued his work as one of his disciples. Her story of sacrifice and devotion serves as a model for us as we seek to deepen our commitment to the Lord—and it provides the perfect church curriculum for this holy season.

A volume in the Studies in Faithful Living Series, Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan, is available as a complete church curriculum or an individual study guide, allowing your entire church to engage Mary’s rich and compelling story together. Both versions feature infographics, maps, thought-provoking questions and answer boxes, Bible study tips, and an annotated reading list for further study.

Here’s a peek at what you’ll find in chapter 2 of Mary: Devoted to God’s Plan:

Historical & Cultural Background. Luke does not tell us exactly where Elizabeth lived in Judah. He simply describes the area as “the hill country” (Luke 1:39). The book of Joshua lists nine cities in the hill country of the tribe of Judah (Josh. 15:48–54; see also Josh. 11:21). It’s likely Elizabeth and Zechariah lived in the hilly region to the southwest of Jerusalem.

Mary came from Nazareth, a Galilean city west of the Sea of Galilee (see Luke 1:26). Her journey from Nazareth to the hill country of Judah covered between 80 and 100 miles. Luke does not mention whether Mary made any preparations for the trip or how she traveled; she may have gone on foot or as part of a caravan. In Mary’s day, a person traveling by foot could cover about 20 miles per day. If Mary walked to Elizabeth’s home, it would have taken her four to five days. If she accompanied a caravan, she would have arrived in about three days.

Tip: Looking at a map can often shed light on a story. To see the distance Mary had to travel to see Elizabeth, open up Logos and select “Biblical Places” under the “Tools” menu, and then search for “Nazareth.” Select the map titled “Jesus’ Journeys to Jerusalem.” You’ll see Nazareth at the top in the region of Galilee, and the hill country of Judah in the south, west of the Dead Sea between the cities of Jerusalem and Hebron.

In either case, Mary demonstrated her courage as well as her desire for confirmation of God’s plan—such a journey would have been dangerous, especially for a young girl alone. Mary serves as a role model, not only for her obedience, but for her action. She overcome any fear she may have had about surrendering to God’s call on her life or facing the possible danger involved in confirming his will. Such complete surrender freed her to act in confidence.

Dig deeper into the life of Mary and take your faith to a new level of commitment as you and your congregation prepare to celebrate Jesus’ birth. The complete church curriculum is available at a 25% Pre-Pub discount of $74.95, and the individual study guide is $14.95—that’s 50% off the regular price.

Studies in Faithful Living Patriarchs Collection: Complete Church Curriculum

Equip your entire church or small group with 24 weeks of study material exploring the origins of our faith with the Studies in Faithful Living Patriarchs Collection: Complete Church Curriculum. Now until December 5, this three-volume collection is available at the Pre-Pub price of $224.95—over 15% off the retail price.

The patriarchs are not only the first to walk in covenant with God—they are examples for us today showing that God’s love is based on his faithfulness, not ours. Abraham often stumbled in his walk with God, even repeating mistakes along the way. He often tried to find his own solution as he struggled to accept God’s timing. Abraham’s son Isaac transferred the covenant from one generation to the next. And Isaac’s son Jacob insisted on taking control of his own life, often tricking others—even his brother and father—to get his own way. Jacob wrestled with trusting God on God’s terms, but when God showed himself faithful, Jacob became the father of a nation. Among Jacob’s 12 sons, Joseph was God’s choice to continue the covenant, though his father’s favoritism and his brothers’ scheming threatened to ruin them all. God took actions that were meant for evil and used them for good, just as he does in our lives today.

As we walk alongside these men, we see how much their struggles resemble our own, and we learn how their faith is relevant for us today. This all-in-one curriculum package has all the resources you need for six full months of exploring Scripture together:

  • Preaching resources and sermon outlines for pastors and teachers
  • Videos, customizable slides, and media
  • Discussion guides and videos for small group leaders
  • Bulletin inserts and handouts for the entire congregation
  • An individual book, available separately, for members of the congregation and small groups to study during the week

When you order the Studies in Faithful Living Patriarchs Collection: Complete Church Curriculum, Abraham: Following God’s Promise will download immediately when orders are processed. The remaining studies, Jacob: Discerning God’s Promise and Joseph: Understanding God’s Purpose, will download automatically as they are released. Don’t miss this opportunity to get the entire collection at the Pre-Pub price!

Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection

Act now and you’ll get all 13 volumes of Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection for over 20% off the regular price.

As Christians, we must grasp the exegetical and theological issues of Paul’s letters to powerfully and persuasively teach the New Testament. If only you had the time you need to get to know these 13 books inside and out, to be aware of all the issues, and to understand Paul’s writings, individually and collectively. Thanks to the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection, you do have time—because we’ve done all the research for you.

Among the apostles, Paul and his dramatic conversion reveal God’s redemptive work at its most dramatic. God worked both in and through Paul, to transform him and to spread the Gospel. Paul not only risked his life to establish churches throughout the ancient world, he was also used by God to author much of what would become the New Testament. From the road to Damascus to a Roman prison and every missionary journey in between, the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection empowers you to interpret some of the most theologically crucial chapters of the Bible. Each volume immerses you so completely in the Scripture that even familiar passages disclose new lessons and applications. For complex issues—and there are more than we can count in Paul’s letters—we’ll guide you through and provide links to additional resources in your Logos library.

The Lexham Bible Guides direct you to the best commentaries for the subject you’re researching. The Paul’s Letters Collection offers a complete introduction to each literary unit of each book, helping you hone in on more thorough research in a fraction of the time you usually spend searching commentaries and other resources. They provide an overview of each passage’s structure, its place within the book and the canon, major issues within the passage, key word studies, and applications to help you present this depth of research in a way that’s relevant for your faith community—including customizable slides to use in your presentations.

Each volume provides you with the tools you need to find answers quickly. The collection summarizes content from resources throughout your Logos library and organizes it in an easy-to-follow format, guiding you deeper in your study of Paul’s letters:

When you order the Lexham Bible Guide: Paul’s Letters Collection, Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians will automatically download once orders are processed. The remaining volumes will download automatically as they are released. You’ll benefit from this collection now and for years to come.

Get a Look inside Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians

You’ve read how the Lexham Bible Guides both simplify and maximize your study time. Each chapter presents an overview of a passage, that passage’s structure and place within the book and biblical canon, key word studies, and an application overview.

You’ll find the crux of the research in the Issues at a Glance section, which explores topics from the passage and presents a list of curated links to your Logos library that cover the range of viewpoints on those topics. But what does that look like? In Ephesians 2, Paul discusses several weighty theological issues and introduces the concept of the “new man.” How may Paul have understood that concept and explained it in his letter? Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians presents the major interpretive options for you. Let’s take a look.

One New Humanity

According to Eph. 2:15, the purpose of the invalidation of the law is the creation of one new man (hena kainon anthrōpon), or, as other translations (e.g., NIV, NRSV) often put it, “one new humanity.” What did Paul mean by this phrase, and who is included in this “new humanity?” Most interpreters fall into one of two camps: those who understand the “new man” to refer to the regenerated believer, and those who take the “new man” to refer to all believers in Christ in a collective sense.

  • Ernest Best notes that the text may refer either to a new group of individuals or to two groups—Jews and Gentiles—now made into one. After listing several points in support of both positions, Best maintains the former.
  • Andrew T. Lincoln uses both individual and corporate language to explain the concept of “one new man.” He describes Paul’s ecclesiology, here dependent on Adam, in terms of a corporate identity in the new person, Christ.

Lexham Bible Guides gather the major interpretive options on a biblical book’s content in one place, helping you understand difficult concepts and original language words. Not only do they jumpstart your research and sermon preparation—they make it easy to share that information through professionally designed slides and slide templates.

Maximize your study time and make the most of your Logos library with the Lexham Bible Guides. Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians ships October 23. Pre-order it now at the Pre-Pub price.