Keeping Logos Synced on Two Computers

Our EULA allows you to install Logos on two of your machines for your personal use. If you have Logos on two machines, you may be well aware of the challenge of keeping everything in sync between your desktop and your laptop or netbook, or between your home computer and your work computer.

You can currently keep your licenses in sync between your two machines by going to Tools > Library Management > Synchronize Licenses (your licenses are safely backed up on our servers), but what about the rest of your data?

If you use Logos extensively on both machines, you will probably eventually end up with notes, visual markups, favorites, bookmarks, Bible reading plans, prayer lists, toolbars, collections, resource associations, diagrams, saved searches, etc. that are on one computer but not on the other—or even worse, that are on both, but not identical. Having your valuable data spread between two computers is not a good scenario. I originally tried to create or edit my content only on one machine and use the other machine only to access my library and do searches. But this proved not to be a very good long-term solution for a number of reasons. If Logos is installed on two of your machines, it makes the most sense to use all of its features on both machines.

But what’s the best way to accomplish this?

Manual Method: USB Thumb Drive

Some people solve this problem by using a USB thumb drive. They carry their drive with them at all times and copy their My Documents\Libronix DLS folder to it after every use—replacing only the updated files. Then they copy those files to their other computer—again, replacing only the updated files. This method can work, but it’s far too tedious for most, and it’s too easy to forget to do it every time. Before you know it, your files are out of sync.

Thankfully there’s a better way.

Automatic Method: Sync Software

There are many free applications that allow you to sync files and folders across a network or across the internet. Some sync directly between the two computers, requiring that both be running at the same time. Others use a cloud backup of your files, eliminating this problem.

My personal recommendation is to use a combination of Windows Live Mesh and Windows Live Sync (formerly FolderShare)—Live Mesh for your My Documents\Libronix DLS folder and Live Sync for your Program Files\Libronix DLS\Resources folder.

Live Mesh: Sync Your Personal Files

Live Mesh allows you to sync up to 5GB of data with no limit to the number of files and folders that make up that 5GB. It uses a cloud backup of your data, so your machines can stay in sync even if you never have them both powered on at the same time—and your data is protected if both of your machines are stolen, destroyed, etc. Live Mesh also comes with remote desktop functionality, so you can log on to one of your machines (if it is powered on) from your other machine to access data you need but aren’t syncing.

Before you use Live Mesh, be sure to back up all of the data you plan to sync. If you do something wrong, it’s possible to unintentionally delete important files. Our customer service team cannot provide support for third-party software, so proceed with caution if you’re not at least moderately techie.

To use Live Mesh to sync your personal Logos files, install the application on both machines, navigate to your My Documents folder, right click on Libronix DLS, and then click “Add folder to Live Mesh.” Live Mesh will begin syncing your files and notify you of any conflicts that need to be resolved. In my experience, it’s best to start either with identical data on both computers or with the data only on one computer. Otherwise you may have hundreds or thousands of file discrepancies to deal with.

Live Sync: Sync Your Resources

Unlike Live Mesh, Live Sync has no GB limit, but it does have a file limit of 20,000 files per synchronized folder (you can have up to 20 synchronized folders). This makes Live Sync ideal for keeping your resources in sync, since many users have more than 5GB of resources, and a cloud backup of resources is unnecessary. No more having to install a new product on both machines. Install it on either machine, sync your licenses, and Live Sync will take care of syncing your new resources.

To use Live Sync to sync your Logos resources, install the application on both machines, and then set up and sync your folder from the Live Sync website. Live Sync errs on the side of protecting your data, so when duplicates are found, it will keep both by renaming one of them to indicate its source. To avoid having lots of duplicates to clean up, it’s best to start with identical data or with data only on one machine.

Using a combination of Live Mesh and Live Sync will enable you to keep your Logos files in sync effortlessly. If you’re looking for a good sync solution for Logos, I highly recommend giving this a try.

What do you do to keep your Logos data in sync? What are your favorite sync programs? Let us know in the comments.

Update: Mark points out in the comments that Live Mesh can sync more than 5GB by simply disabling the sync to Live Desktop for the folder that you don’t need a cloud backup of. This means that you could use Live Mesh for both your personal Logos files and your resources. Thanks for the tip, Mark.

John Calvin’s 500th Birthday

Today marks the 500th anniversary of the birth of John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564). Hundreds of thousands commemorate this day with gratitude to God for this man and his influence on the church.

Many who disagree with his theology still regard him as a gift to the church. John Wesley called him “a great instrument of God,” and Jacob Arminius considered Calvin “incomparable in the interpretation of Scripture” and recommended Calvin’s commentaries second only to the Bible itself. So learning and benefiting from Calvin isn’t just for the five pointers.

To join in the celebration of the grace of God in the life of John Calvin, we decide to launch Calvin500.com—a resource site devoted to everything John Calvin—and create several new Calvin collections, including the impressive Calvin 500 Collection, which contains more than 100 books by and about John Calvin.

If you missed the original announcement and haven’t yet seen the site or the collections, be sure to give them a look.

In addition to the site and the collections, don’t miss out on the two special birthday presents we have for you.

More Books, No Additional Charge!

First, we’ve added 11 new volumes to the Calvin 500 Collection, bringing the total up to 108! To cover the addition of these new titles, the price needs to go up. But instead of raising it immediately, we decided that we’d keep it at the already crazy price of $299.95 through the weekend. If you’ve been contemplating placing your pre-order, you have one last chance to pick up the most comprehensive Calvin collection on the planet at the lowest possible price. First thing Monday morning (July 13), the price will increase.

If you’ve already pre-ordered the Calvin 500 Collection, you’ll get all of these 11 new titles at no additional charge, but we need your help to cover the added cost. Please spread the word about the even bigger Calvin 500 Collection. Blog it. Tweet it. Facebook it. Or email it.

Get a Free Copy of Calvin’s Institutes!

Institutes of the Christian Religion by John CalvinSecond, we’re giving away the Beveridge translation of Calvin’s Institutes through the end of the month. To get your free book, you’ll need three things:

  1. a copy of the Libronix Digital Library System installed on your PC or Mac
  2. a Logos.com account with a credit card on file
  3. a Libronix Customer ID that is connected to your Logos.com account

Here are the steps to follow to get all set up:

Step 1: Download and install Libronix for Windows. (Mac users can purchase the Mac version of the engine, or buy a Mac base package.) If you already have Libronix up and running on your computer, jump to the third step.

Step 2: Activate Libronix. When you do, you’ll create a Libronix Customer ID (usually your email address, if you enter it). You can find your Libronix Customer ID by going to Help > About Libronix DLS.

Step 3: Create a Logos.com account. If you already have one, just log in.

Step 4: Make sure that your Libronix Customer ID is associated with your Logos.com account. Go to My Account, enter your Libronix Customer ID from Step 2, and click “Confirm.” If it’s already there, no need to do anything.

Step 5: “Buy” the Institutes of the Christian Religion by John Calvin. Go to the page and click “Add to Cart,” or just add it straight to your cart from here, and then make sure to add the CALVIN-500 coupon code to your cart and click “Update Cart.” Proceed through the checkout process and then click “Submit Order.” If you don’t have a credit card on file, you’ll need to enter your credit card information. Don’t worry. You won’t be charged. It’s an unfortunate inconvenience in our current checkout system, and we hope to change it at some point.

Step 6: Unlock and download your new book. If you’re on a Windows machine, just click the orange “Unlock & Download” button. If you’re on a Mac, just synchronize your licenses (Tools > Library Management > Synchronize Licenses) and manually put the book file in your resources folder (Macintosh HD/Library/Application Support/Libronix DLS/Resources on the startup volume).

Step 7: Start using your new book! Open Libronix, open My Library, then type Institutes to find it. Double-click it to open it.

4th of July Fun

Most Americans celebrated the 4th of July by watching fireworks, but five Logos employees celebrated by spending more than 80 hours working outside—in temperatures approaching 100 degrees in the afternoon—putting on a massive fireworks display for others to enjoy. Customer Service representatives Justin Kooy, Debbie Mickens, Kat Hutchison, and Christy Powell and software developer James Van Noord joined three others to put on a fireworks display at Fort Spokane over the July 4th weekend.

All but one of the Logos pyrotechnicians have done professional displays in the past, and Justin will be getting his official pyrotechnics license later this summer. We thought you’d enjoy seeing how some of the people behind the product spent their 4th of July.

Here’s a slideshow of some of the pictures—courtesy of James Van Noord.

A congratulations is definitely in order to Justin Kooy, who proposed to his now-fiancée Katie during the fireworks show (see the second to last picture). Congratulations, Justin and Katie!

New Free Content from Bible Study Magazine

Bible Study at BatIf you don’t subscribe to Bible Study Magazine—or have just started—be sure to check out all of the free articles that are available at BibleStudyMagazine.com. Every month at least one new article gets posted on the Preview page.

The latest article, “Bible Study at Bat,” looks at the role of chaplains and Bible study in Major and Minor League Baseball. Past articles include

  • “Does the Author of Ecclesiastes Need Prozac?”
  • “Facing Today with the Book of Hebrews”
  • “Choosing a Bible Translation”
  • “Bible Study and Rock Music”
  • “Bible Study in Hollywood”
  • “NLT Study Bible”

We’ve also just launched a new Word Studies page, which features word study articles on πρωτότοκος (prototokos), נפשׁ (nephesh), and δύναμις (dunamis). If you don’t read Greek and Hebrew, don’t worry; the articles are useful for English-only Bible students as well.

  • “Figuring Out the Firstborn in Colossians 1:18”
  • “Soul Searching in Deuteronomy 6:5”
  • “Discovering the Power of Luke’s Gospel”

Head on over to the Preview page and the Word Studies page to view the new articles.

2 New Free Greek Vocabulary Lists

If you’re learning a new language, mastering the most commonly used words is an essential task. Did you know that Logos makes available 24 different vocabulary lists taken from the most popular grammars to help you? We currently have 14 different Greek vocabulary lists, 7 Hebrew, 2 Aramaic, and 1 Akkadian. The best part is that all of these lists are free. Just download them and save them to C:\. . .\My Documents\Libronix DLS\VocabularyLists.

The two latest additions are the lists from Learn to Read New Testament Greek by David Alan Black and Essentials of New Testament Greek by Ray Summers. Visit our Vocabulary Lists page to download these new lists—and any of the others you’d like. You don’t have to own the corresponding resources to make use of the vocabulary lists.

Once you’ve downloaded them, you can access your new lists in Logos by going to File > Open, selecting “Vocabulary List” from the Types column, and then selecting the list of your choice from the Documents column.

With your list opened, you have the ability to add to it, edit it, and print out vocabulary cards that you can carry with you and review between classes or when you’re away from your computer.

If you’re not a fan of print vocabulary cards, you can work through the lists right in Logos. Just grab another Window and cover up the right column. Move it down after you guess the meaning for each Greek word.

Visit our Vocabulary Lists page to download the available lists.

Using RefTagger with Bible.Logos.com and Ref.ly Links

By default RefTagger will tag only the bare Bible references on your site. If a Bible reference is already linked to Bible.Logos.com or another online Bible site, RefTagger will ignore it. So you won’t get the cool tooltips to show up on references you’ve already linked manually.

We’ve received some feedback from people who want to be able to link Bible references to Bible.Logos.com and have RefTagger add the tooltips, so we’ve decided to add support for it. It also works with Ref.ly links, which is perfect if you syndicate your Twitter feed to your blog.

Here are a couple of examples:

All you need to do to enable this new functionality is add one additional line of code to the RefTagger script code in the footer of your site. Simply add

Logos.ReferenceTagging.lbsConvertHyperlinks = true;

to the RefTagger JavaScript code anywhere before the line

Logos.ReferenceTagging.tag();

This will tell RefTagger to add tooltips to all of the Bible references that are hard linked to Bible.Logos.com or Ref.ly.

Why would you want to do this? Well, since RefTagger uses JavaScript, Bible references in your site’s feed don’t get linked because the JavaScript code runs only on your site, not in your readers’ feed reader (e.g., Google Reader or Bloglines). If you want your Bible references to be linked in your feed, you’ll have to link them manually (or use this hack to save a little time). Before, you had to choose between linking your Bible references to Bible.Logos.com or using RefTagger. Now you can do both and enjoy the best of both worlds.

ESV Study Bible Coming to Logos

ESV Study BibleThe ESV Study Bible from Crossway is one of the best study Bibles on the market. This carefully crafted volume packs in 2 million words (including the ESV Bible text), 20,000 notes, 50+ articles, 200+ charts, 200+ full-color maps, 80,000 cross-references, 40 illustrations, and more. The ESVSB brings together a wealth of evangelical scholarship in a concise and refreshing way and is sure to help you understand God’s Word better.

This award-winning study Bible is about to get even better. It’s now available on our Pre-Pub page in two different versions—a notes-only version for those who already own the ESV Bible (which is included in all of our base packages) and a complete version for those who do not yet have the ESV.

The Logos edition of the ESV Study Bible puts the Bible text in one resource and all of the other content in a second resource. This enables you to view the Bible and study Bible content side by side—and even scroll synchronously when both resources share the same link set. The ESV Study Bible Notes resource will function just like any other commentary and will show up in the Passage Guide along with your favorite study Bibles and commentaries. So no matter what passage you’re studying, the ESV Study Bible with all of its rich content is always just a click away.

Watch the video below to find out why you should add the ESVSB to your digital library.

Copying Bible Text without Footnotes

Most Bible translations have a variety of footnotes throughout the text, giving you instant access to cross references, alternate translations, text-critical notes, and more. These notes are helpful when studying the Bible on your computer, but you may not need them when you copy the text into a sermon or paper.

A fairly common question we hear from new users is how to copy text from a Bible without including the internal footnotes. Let’s take Romans 12:1–2 in the ESV, for example.

You’ll notice 10 notes in these two verses. The superscript letters are for cross references, and the superscript numbers are for alternate translations, comments on manuscripts, etc. Sometimes you may want to include these when copying and pasting, but often you want just the bare Bible text.

There are three ways to accomplish this.

Method 1: Switch to “Bible Text Only” Viewing Mode.

With your Bible open and active, go to the View menu and select “Bible Text Only.” This will strip out all footnotes and allow you to copy only the text with chapter and verse numbers. The downside to this method is that you lose the paragraphing; each verse is formatted as its own paragraph.

Method 2: Uncheck “Include Footnotes When Copying.”

Another option is to go to Tools > Options > General > Interface and uncheck the box “Include Footnotes When Copying.” This will tell Libronix to skip any internal footnotes when copying text from your resources. Formatting and paragraphing will be preserved, but the potential downside to this method is that it applies to all resources and not just Bibles. So if you like having footnotes appear when you copy text from a commentary, for example, then you’ll want to try the next method.

Method 3: Use the “Copy Bible Verses” Tool.

This final method is far and away the best. If you’ve paid careful attention to the icons in your system tray (which is usually in the lower right corner of your screen next to the time), you’ve probably noticed that Libronix adds three icons when it’s open. The black one that looks like a Bible is the Copy Bible Verses tool.

There are two ways to use this powerful tool. You can double-click on the icon in your system tray, type in a passage, and click “Copy” (or “Copy and Paste” to send it directly to your open Word document, for example). Or you can highlight the text you want to copy and select “Copy Romans 12:1-2 to Clipboard” (instead of selecting “Copy” or using Ctrl+c).

One of the cool features of the Copy Bible Verses tool is that you can create as many different styles as you want—one for your sermons, another for your blog posts, another for papers, etc. For additional help creating styles, see the training article “Copy Text without Footnotes and Citations.”

If you copy Bible text frequently, you’ll quickly come to love this very handy little tool. It’s not hard to see why this is some users’ favorite feature.

People behind the Product: Meet the Anchor Yale Bible Team

The Anchor Yale Bible was our biggest Pre-Pub ever in terms of its size, the number of hours it took to get it from print to digital, and the team assembled to tackle it.

Pictured below are the folks in our Electronic Text Development department who did the lion’s share of the work.

Several others are not pictured here because they forgot to wear their t-shirts! Many more were involved in other ways like working with the publisher and doing things like marketing, sales, testing, shipping, and support.

Since this was a special Pre-Pub, we did something out of the ordinary. One of our artists designed a t-shirt that those who worked closely on the project received. Here’s a close-up of someone wearing his new t-shirt proudly.

I know some of you are thinking how much you’d like to add this to your wardrobe. Well, if you wear a medium, you just might be able to. We have three medium t-shirts left. If you bought the Anchor Yale Bible and want one of these cool shirts, leave a comment below. We’ll randomly pick out three winners and send out the shirts in the next day or two.

Goliath and the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament

“Goliath and the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament” — at BibleStudyMagazine.comWas Goliath really nine-and-a-half feet tall? Did David actually kill Goliath? A new interactive article from BibleStudyMagazine.com has the answers.

In “Clash of the Manuscripts: Goliath and the Hebrew text of the Old Testament,” which appeared on pages 33–35 of the May–June issue of Bible Study Magazine, Dr. Michael Heiser discusses two textual problems that have bearing on the height and death of Goliath. Looking at all of the data, Dr. Heiser shows how to reconcile the conflicting sources.

Read the article to find out if your Sunday school teacher was right.

If you enjoy the article and want to share it on your blog, just copy the HTML code at the bottom of the page.

To see the previous interactive articles, be sure to visit the Interactive page.