Deleting Duplicate Resources

Hard drive prices continue to plummet. I was surprised to notice a couple of days ago that you can now get a 500 GB Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 desktop hard drive for under $75. The 7200.11 is only $5 more. When I checked a few months ago, they were $110 and $120 respectively.

If you’re like me, though, you still manage to find plenty of things to fill up your hard drive with and want to make sure that you don’t have unnecessary duplicate content taking up precious space.

Cleaning Up Your Libronix Library

It is likely that you have multiple copies of at least some of your resources on your hard drive. Here are three possible scenarios:

  • You have old LLS resources, downloaded the new Libronix ones, and never deleted the old ones.
  • You have more than one resources folder, and the same resources have accidentally ended up in more than one of them.
  • You manually copied resources to your resources folder and had Windows keep both instead of overwriting or skipping.

If you have the Power Tools Addin, you can easily remove these duplicate resources and free up some hard drive space. (If you don’t have it, you can install it by simply running Libronix Update and checking the appropriate box.)

Here are the steps to take for the best experience in removing your duplicate resources:

  1. Refresh Resources: Go to Tools > Options > General > Resource Paths and click “Refresh Resources.” Restart Libronix to start the refreshing process. You’ll see “Discovering Resources” in the bottom right-hand corner. It will disappear once the refreshing process is complete.
  2. Restart Libronix: Once Libronix is done refreshing resources, restart Libronix twice.
  3. Run the Remove Duplicate Resources Tool: Go to Tools > Library Management > Remove Duplicate Resources, and Libronix will begin scanning your resource paths for any duplicate resources files. You can leave it at “Unlocked on Local Drives” unless you keep locked resources on your computer.
  4. Delete the Duplicate Files: When it finishes building the list, you’ll see that at least one box is checked for each duplicate resource. (You shouldn’t need to check any boxes. Libronix will automatically check the boxes for the files that can safely been deleted.) Libronix will keep the newest resource and delete all others. Scan through the list to see what files will be deleted, and then click “Delete Files.”

That’s it. Enjoy that extra space! :)

PBB, or Not PBB: That Is the Question.

Everyone likes free. But it’s still often true that “you get what you pay for.” In this post I’d like to address the issue of free Personal Book Builder (PBB) public domain books vs. Logos editions of public domain books.

The question comes often and in a variety of forms, but the bottom-line issue is whether the added features and functionality of the public domain books that we produce are worth the cost when compared to the books created and freely shared by many of our users using the Personal Book Builder.

One user asks,

I am seeking an in depth answer to a question I’ve had trouble having answered to my satisfaction: What are the advantages of Logos public domain resources over PBB public domain resources?

PBB’s can be placed in one’s Logos library, hovering the cursor over a Bible version reveals the text, and, of course, PBB’s can be searched. So what can the Logos version do that the PBB version cannot do?

The Standard Edition of our Personal Book Builder tool allows users to create their own Libronix resources from their sermons, lectures, class notes, or books in the public domain (or any material for which they hold the copyright) and share them with other users who have the PBB Reading Key, which is included in all of our base packages. (A Private Use Edition is also available at a reduced price, but the books cannot be shared with other users.)

The PBB meets a real need for those who want to have their notes, lectures, and other materials searchable in Libronix, but is it the best solution for building your library of public domain titles? Some say yes. Others say no. I’m going to give you the facts and let you decide for yourself.

Advantages of PBB Public Domain Books

  1. Cost: PBB books are free (however, see #1 below). Most of the Logos editions of public domain books are not free, though they are often priced less expensively than copyrighted material. The Community Pricing Program enables you to pick up public domain books at very low prices. But still, they aren’t free.
  2. Control: This is not really an advantage of the books themselves, but I needed a #2. :) Since users can create their own resources with the PBB, there’s no need to wait until we decide to put a title on Community Pricing or Pre-Pub and no need to wait until it generates sufficient interest to send it into production. If you want it, you can do the work and make it. (But this assumes that you either (1) spend the money to purchase the Personal Book Builder or (2) have a friend willing to do your projects for you.)

Advantages of Logos Public Domain Books

  1. Accessibility: PBB books require the PBB Reading Key, which is available only in our base packages or by purchasing the Standard Edition of our Personal Book Builder (PBB) tool. So while PBBs are free, you’re looking at a $115 prerequisite at minimum (i.e., Christian Home Library with 25% off discount) to be able to use them. The public domain books that Logos produces can be used by anyone without a special reading key and without having to own a base package (though we would certainly encourage you to purchase a base package to get the most out of your public domain purchases).
  2. Appearance: PBB books do not follow your font choices. You’re stuck with whatever the builder decided to use when he created the files. For the most part, Logos books allow you to customize which fonts are used for Greek, Hebrew (and other Semitic languages), and English (with a special script code). PBB books also don’t zoom as nicely as Logos books (the scroll bar increases in size along with the font).
  3. Accuracy: PBB books are usually not as carefully proofed as our editions are. Since the individuals who build the PBBs are not being paid for their time, they usually don’t proof their work as carefully for accuracy. Logos books are OCRed and checked carefully to guarantee a very high degree of accuracy. Many are also updated to fix typos and other issues.
  4. Extensiveness: Many PBB books and collections are not complete; they are often based on partial texts that are available online. Many books lack footnotes and some collections lack entire volumes. In our editions we strive to provide you with as complete of a set of works as possible, even often bringing you more than is found in modern reprints.
  5. Tagging and Linking: Many PBB books are pretty sparse on Bible reference tagging and other tagging. Logos books usually include tagging for all Bible references and often lots of tagging to other resources available in Libronix. This isn’t to say that PBB books can’t be thoroughly tagged, just that, as a general rule, they aren’t.
  6. Data Types and Searching: For the most part the only data types that you’ll find in PBB books are the Bible data type and (sometimes) page numbers. This means that PBBs won’t be keylink targets and won’t be as searchable as Logos books. PBBs also lack fields and don’t allow you to limit your search to specific portions of text like footnotes, body text, etc.
  7. Citations: The source text of many PBBs is unknown or unspecified, so the auto-generated footnotes often don’t contact sufficient information to be useful for articles, papers, books, or other publications. Most Logos books contain all the pertinent information necessary for proper citations.
  8. Book Types: PBB books are not able to be categorized as Bibles or commentaries and therefore won’t function the way Logos Bibles and commentaries do (i.e., Bibles won’t appear in the various Bible version tools, and commentaries won’t appear in the commentaries section of the Passage Guide).
  9. Notes and Highlighting: You cannot add notes or highlighting and other visual markups to PBB books. Logos books can be extensively marked up and annotated.
  10. Support: Since we don’t make the PBB books themselves, we cannot provide the same level of support for them as we do for our own books. If there is a problem with the book itself, you will need to contact the book’s creator, who may or may not be willing to provide support or fix the problem.

The Personal Book Builder is a wonderful tool and serves its purpose well, but it may not be the best tool for building a library of public domain titles. If you are on a tight budget, want to accomplish very simple tasks like reading and basic searching, don’t always need exhaustive texts and a high level of accuracy, and can get by without advanced functionality, the PBB books might be sufficient for you. If any of the 10 items listed about are important to you, the Logos editions may be the better choice.

Creating a Resource Update Toolbar Button

In Wednesday’s blog post I talked about the Resource Auto Update script and how it is important that you run it regularly to make sure that you have the most up-to-date version of your resource files.

I mentioned how you could bookmark the link in your browser, but some of you may prefer to have the link right in Libronix. So I’ve created a quick video demo that shows you how to create a resource update toolbar button.

If you don’t want to watch the video but just want the steps, here they are:

  1. Open Libronix.
  2. Right click in the toolbar area and click “Customize.”
  3. Click “New” to create a new toolbar. (You can also add the button to a pre-existing custom toolbar.)
  4. Leave the “Category” as “Special,” and click on “Go To (Internet Application).”
  5. Click “Add,” give the toolbar a name like “Resource Update,” and then click on “Details.”
  6. (Optional: Give the button a name, select a style and icon, and assign a shortcut key.)
  7. Paste the following link into the “Internet Address” box: http://www.logos.com/media/update/ResourceAutoUpdate.lbxupd.
  8. Click “OK,” “OK,” and “Close.”
  9. Click your new button (or use your shortcut key) to run the Resource Auto Update.

Or just download the toolbar, put it in your My Documents\Libronix DLS\CustomToolbars folder, and enable it from the right-click menu by clicking in the toolbar area and selecting “Resource Update.”

Updating Your Resources

We strive to produce very high quality digital books, but typos do creep in sometimes. With the help of our attentive users and our typo reporting tool (Help > Report Typo), our electronic text development department is often able to get these typos fixed and new files added to our FTP site. You’ll find them at ftp://ftp.logos.com/lbxbooks/.

Why Should You Update?

Updating your resources is good for you and us. It gives you more accurate resources with better functionality, and it also helps to eliminate typo reports on outdated resources.

How Do You Updated?

The simplest way to get the latest files for your books is to run the Resource Auto Update script: http://www.logos.com/media/update/ResourceAutoUpdate.lbxupd. Simply click this link and choose “Open” if your browser gives you an option.

Libronix Update will scan the resources on your hard drive and then give you a list of resources that are outdated.

You could check the box next to Resources to download all of the updates, but if this is your first time running the Resource Auto Update script (or you haven’t run it in a while), you might want to look at the “Total Download” size before you hit “Update.”

My update is 159.30 MB, and since I have a very fast connection here at work, this won’t take long at all. But if you’re on a slower DSL or dial up connection, this could take several hours. If you’re uncertain of your connection speed or how long it might take, the best approach would be to download them a handful at a time so you can gauge how long it’s going to take. Check half a dozen boxes and try a smaller download first. Then repeat the process until you’re done with all of them. (Note: you’ll need to start Libronix in between each session or else you’ll be prompted to download the same resources you just download.)

When it completes the download, you’ll be prompted to close Libronix (if it was opened). After it finishes, you can start Libronix and begin using your newly updated books.

Bookmark This!

We recommend that you run this at least once a month. To remember this link for later, just right-click on it and select “Add to Favorites” (Internet Explorer) or “Bookmark This Link” (Firefox). You’ll also find this link at the bottom of this page: http://www.logos.com/support/download/30bupdate, which is accessible from the Support section of our website (Support > Download the Latest Version > Update).

Adding RefTagger to a Drupal Site

LogoDrupal is popular open source Content Management System (CMS) software. Many churches and ministries use it.

A few days ago I got a request from an individual who wants to add RefTagger to his Drupal site but isn’t sure how to get it set up, so I thought I’d provide a quick tutorial.

Unfortunately, Drupal doesn’t allow you to edit the code of your themes from the admin panel, at least not that I can see. But if you have access to your site’s files via FTP, you can add RefTagger very easily.

Here are the simple steps you need to follow:

  1. Use an FTP program to navigate to the folder where you installed Drupal.
  2. Open the “themes” subfolder, and then open the folder for the specific theme you are using. (The default theme is Minneli, which is a subtheme of Garland, so you’ll find the file in the “garland” folder.)
  3. Locate the page.tpl.php file, and save a local copy (and a backup copy too).
  4. Open the file in Dreamweaver, WordPad, or your favorite code editor.
  5. Scroll to the bottom and paste the customizable RefTagger code before the </body> tag.
  6. Save the file and upload it back to your server.

That’s it. RefTagger is now transforming the content of your Drupal site!

If you’re using RefTagger on your Drupal site, please let us know. We’d love to see how you are putting it to use.

For help with other sites, see the tutorials section on the RefTagger page.

Books, Books, and More Books!

I’m a book lover. While I prefer the digital kind, I still love the print ones too. Whenever I visit another book lover’s home, my eyes are almost irresistibly drawn to his bookshelves.

As you can imagine, we have thousands of print books around the office. My wife works over in the Electronic Text Development department, and I’m always peeking at the bookshelves to see what’s new when I go over to meet her for lunch.

In the last week or two, we’ve had several big shipments of books that have really gotten me excited. The shipments weren’t quite as big as the ones we got from T&T Clark a couple of years ago, but they contained some excellent books that I know many of you will be as thrilled about as I am. I wish I could tell you more, but I don’t want to ruin the surprise.

You have probably noticed that it’s been fairly quiet on the Pre-Pub page over the last couple of weeks, but that’s about to change very soon. Stay tuned!

RefTagger’s Got Style

When we first launched it back in February, RefTagger simply turned Bible references into hyperlinks to BibleGateway. Then in May we added the ability to have the text pop up when you hover over references, making the web a little more like your favorite Bible software.

Now RefTagger’s got style!

We used to control the look of the tooltip windows. We intentionally made them plain and neutral colored so they would load quickly and work well with the broadest number of websites possible.

Here’s the default look for John 3:16:

We realize, though, that the default style may not be the best fit for every site.

Recently a major ministry that was planning to add RefTagger to their site contacted us and asked if they could override the default styling of the tooltip windows to make them match their site. We thought it was a great idea, so we decided to add it as a new feature.

Now you can have full control over the styling of the tooltips and change the font, font size, font color, background color, padding, line spacing, etc.

Here are some examples of how you can style your tooltips:

You can see customized tooltips in action at the resources section of the Grace to You website and at Desiring God’s Resource Library.

To override the default styling, just follow these three simple steps.

We hope this makes RefTagger an even more useful tool for your website. Thanks for providing great feedback. Please send any problems or further feature requests to reftagger@logos.com.

Making the Switch to Logos

I read with interest over the last month or so LaRosa Johnson’s 30 Day Challenge. He wanted to see if Logos was best suited to meet his Bible study needs.

In his own words,

The reason that I came up with this challenge is because my needs and wants for Bible software are changing, and doing so rather rapidly. When I first started studying the Bible and using Bible software, I was someone who only occasionally made use of commentaries and dictionaries, but never even dared to try to use the original language tools that I had available. . . . Now that I am actually learning to read the original languages (Greek and Hebrew), my desire to do more with this knowledge has grown tremendously. . . . With these changing needs, I figured that it would be best to evaluate which software applications would be best for making this happen, especially when taking into consideration how I study, where I want to go, and leaving an open door for growth.

What is the 30 day challenge? Well, the challenge is this: my goal is to exclusively use Logos Bible Software for 30 days . . . and see how well I am able to adjust to using their software and see how well it suits my needs.

He journals his progress in these six posts:

  1. Logos Bible Software: The 30 Day Challenge
  2. The 30 Day Challenge: The First Few Days
  3. The 30 Day Challenge: More Thoughts
  4. The 30 Day Challenge: Praises and Complaints
  5. The 30 Day Challenge: A Few More Wants and Some Cool Features
  6. The 30 Day Challenge: The Conclusion

At the end, he concludes,

For what I’m trying to do in my personal and academic studies, I have to wholeheartedly admit that Logos is the best application to suit my needs. In doing this challenge, the biggest thing that sold me was the ease at which I was able to study in the original languages.

Sneak Peek Inside Bible Study Magazine

Our team is hard at work putting the finishing touches on the inaugural issue of Bible Study Magazine.

To whet your appetite for what’s to come, we thought we’d share some excerpts from the first issue.

“Letter from the Editor” by Michael Heiser

Welcome to our inaugural issue! We know that you will be as excited about Bible Study Magazine as we are.

Bible Study Magazine will enhance your study of God’s word in a variety of ways, suggesting methods of Bible study and offering tips on Bible study tools. It includes advice and encouragement from pastors, teachers, and scholars on Bible study. Interesting and challenging content about the Bible and the ancient biblical world will take your Bible study to a completely new level.

In this first issue, we explore how apologist Josh McDowell studies the Scriptures; the Great Isaiah Scroll (one of the Dead Sea Scrolls) provides insights into how we got the Bible; and choosing a Bible translation.

That might sound like a lot to cover, but we’re just getting started. Whether you’re a pastor, a seasoned Bible student, or someone new to studying God’s Word, Bible Study Magazine is for you.

Enjoy the magazine!

“How Bible Study Saved My Marriage and Changed My Life” by Christy Tennant

When David Lawson became a Christian, his wife, B.J., was out of town visiting a relative. Their marriage was in serious trouble, so David decided to visit a church, where he gave his life to Christ.

“I didn’t know what being a Christian was all about,” says Lawson. “I just felt this incredible question burning in my heart: ‘What do I do now that I’m a Christian?’”

Right at the beginning of his new faith journey, David says there were two things he knew for sure. First, even though his marriage was on the rocks, a divorce was out of the question. And second, having come to faith in Christ under the preaching of a Bible-saturated church, he thought, “If God wrote the Bible, I should probably read it!”

“When I Open the Gospels: An Interview with Dr. Mark Goodacre”

BSM: What are the Synoptic Gospels and what does the term “synoptic” mean?

Goodacre: The Synoptic Gospels are the first three Gospels: Matthew, Mark, and Luke. John is distinguished from the first three because it has a different structure, order, and approach. While there are extensive verbatim (word for word) agreements between the Synoptic Gospels, there are very few between the Synoptics and John. The Synoptic Gospels can be viewed together in three columns in what is called a “Synopsis” and that is the meaning of the term “Synoptic,” “view together.”

“Facing Today with the Book of Hebrews” by John D. Barry

Deeply rooted in the sermon delivered to the Hebrews is a sense of urgency. The same sense of urgency exists today—in a time of war, lack of community and spiritual depravity. Our study of the book will help us understand the pressing need of a previous generation and answer the cry of our own. Through understanding how God equipped ancient believers, we will understand how God can outfit us. Through these ancient texts, we will find modern answers.

When we open the book of Hebrews, we discover a community of Christians living in a time of trial, a community not so different from yours or mine. They, like us, are struggling to understand God in the midst of suffering. In this regard, the message of the book is our message—their story is our story.

You can still pre-order Bible Study Magazine at our discounted Pre-Pub price. Visit http://www.logos.com/biblestudymagazine to see the subscription options and all the other details.

The Logos Blog Turns 3!

Three years and 700 posts later . . .

The Logos blog officially launched on July 29, 2005. If my math is correct, that means that today is our 3rd birthday! No need to buy us any presents, but you’re welcome to buy yourself one if you want. :)

Looking Back

Over the past three years we’ve blogged just about every weekday with a few misses here and there. On an interesting note, yesterday’s blog post was our 700th.

As a quick recap, I thought you might enjoy seeing some of the most viewed posts.

According to Google Analytics, here are the 5 posts with the most pageviews:

  1. Try Out the Pre-Pub Program—and Get a Free Book!
  2. The Lifework of Dr. Jim Rosscup
  3. The Secret to Beating the Postage Increase
  4. Free Sermons in Your Bible Software
  5. New Bible Widget for Mac

According to FeedBurner, here are the 5 posts with the most RSS views:

  1. Learn Logos Bible Software
  2. Understanding Data Types: Definitions
  3. Doing Things Faster with the Keyboard, Part 1
  4. Doing Things Faster with the Keyboard, Part 2
  5. Logos in the Blogosphere

Looking Forward

We’re in the process of upgrading the blog from Movable Type 3.2 to 4.2. We hope to roll out a new look with some cool new features very soon, so stay tuned for an even better Logos blog.

We value your input as we move forward. Feel free to share your suggestions for things you’d like to see us incorporate. We’d also love to hear what kinds of posts you find most helpful. What would you like to see us do more of? What could you do without? In short, what can we do to make the blog an ever better tool to keep you informed and help you get the most out of your Bible software? Let us know by leaving a comment or sending an email to blog@logos.com.