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Logos 4: Collins Thesaurus of the Bible

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I’m often asked if I still learn anything new about Logos. The answer is a resounding yes! The features and resources available in Logos make up a vast goldmine waiting to be explored. I recently noticed a topical Bible, currently available in most Logos base packages, that pulls together in one place numerous verses about a subject. Collins Thesaurus of the Bible organizes thousands of verses around nearly one thousand topics.

I encourage you to open this resource, display its table of contents, and explore its arrangement and riches. This is one of the most thorough yet user-friendly reference books I’ve ever encountered. If you enjoy doing topical and/or cross-reference work, you’ll benefit from this book. After familiarizing yourself with it, try this organizational tip for easy access:

  • Open the Library.
  • Click Prioritize. (1)
  • Enter this text in the Library’s Find box: title:collin’s. (2)
  • Drag Collins Thesaurus of the Bible from the left side of the library to the Prefer these resources list on the left. (3)
  • Make sure the Thesaurus is in the top five of your prioritized topical books.

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  • Navigate in a Bible to a passage like Ephesians 2:20–21. (4)
  • Right click on a word—temple, dwelling, etc. (5)
  • Select from the right menu Selection “your word” | Collins Thesaurus of the Bible. (6)
  • Notice that the resource jumps to an article about your subject even though it may not be the exact word.

Collins2.jpg

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Please note that if you try to right-click the plural form of a word such as apostles or prophets in Ephesians 2:20 the thesaurus may not show up on the right menu. If this occurs try this:

  • Manually select the singular form of the word, leaving off the “s” (in other words manually highlight apostle rather than right clicking on apostles). (7)
  • Right-click on the selected singular form of the word. (7)
  • Select from the right menu: Selection “your singular form of the word” | Collins Thesaurus of the Bible. (8)

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Now enjoy the extensive cross-references, along with the actual verse texts, found in this book!

Logos 4: Power Reading

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Years ago, my mentor, Rob Morgan, taught me that the first step in Bible study is to read the text. The second step is to read it again. The third step is to read it some more. It’s amazing how much we can learn from a passage if we repeatedly and carefully read it. Sometimes, though, during our initial reading we need some clarification about a word or some background information about a person or place. We’re not quite ready for in-depth study with study guides, lexicons, commentaries, and dictionaries, but some quick help sure would be nice. During these times, we need to practice power reading with the Information panel:

  • Open an English-language Bible containing the reverse interlinear feature, such as the ESV, NASB, KJV, NKJV, or NRSV. (1)
  • Choose the Tools menu. (2)
  • Drag the Information tool to the right-hand side of the screen so that it opens in its own large tile. (3)
  • Navigate to a passage of Scripture. (4)
  • Rest the cursor on a word in the Bible. (5)
  • Notice instant information appearing in the Information panel. (6)
  • Move the cursor to another word and watch the data change.

POWER-READING1.jpg

If the information is changing too quickly for you:

  • Click the Settings link on the Information panel. (7)
  • Select Update information on: click. (8)

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Now you’ll have to click a word in the Bible to get the information to change. In addition, in the Settings menu, you can adjust the resources that are used in the Information panel.

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Try using this feature when you’re just reading a “normal” book. Having an instant dictionary close at hand can be beneficial!

Logos 4: Visual Filter for the Greek Words Translated Temple

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In an ideal world, you and I would masterfully read Hebrew and Greek, the Bible’s original languages. If you’re like I am, though, you’re thankful for and dependent on English translations of the Bible. When reading our English Bibles, however, we must always keep in mind that the same English word could be the translation of various Hebrew or Greek words. For example, Mark 14:49 and 14:58 both refer to the temple, but two different Greek words are being translated by the one English word, temple.

Can Logos help identify different original words behind the same English word? Thankfully, the answer is yes. A Visual Filter can “read” the underlining Hebrew or Greek word and then highlight the English translation any way we like.

  • Open a Bible containing the reverse interlinear option (such as the ESV, NASB, LEB, or NKJV) to a passage like Mark 14:49.
  • Right-click the word temple. (1)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” | Search this resource. (2)
  • Click Make Filter on the search panel that just opened with results. (3)
  • Name the Visual Filter that opened. (4)
  • Click the Formatting drop-down list to the right of the Greek search string. (5)
  • Select a highlighting style, such as Double Box. (6)
  • Navigate in the Bible to a different passage, like Mark 14:58. (7)
  • Right-click the word temple. (8)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” | Search this resource. (9)
  • Copy–paste the entire search string from the Search panel to the Find box in the Visual Filter panel. (10)
  • Click the Formatting drop-down list to the right of the Greek search string that was just pasted. (11)
  • Select a highlighting style, such as Box. (12)

Return to the Bible. The word temple (hieron) in Mark 14:49 should have a double box around it and the word temple (naos) in Mark 14:58 should have a single box around it! Try doing this for the different Hebrew words translated praise or sing and the different Greek words translated love, life, or poor.

Of course, we still have to investigate the meaning of each original word, but this Logos feature helps us not automatically assign the same meaning to an English word every time we see it in the Bible.

Logos 4: Custom Keyboard Shortcuts for Highlighting

mp|seminars Tips Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I’ve answered several emails related to the Logos Highlighting tool. This mark-up feature allows for user-created shortcuts, which save tons of time if you do a lot of highlighting. In case you’re not familiar with this time-saving tip, here’s how to create your shortcuts:

  • Choose Tools | Highlighting.
  • Click the arrow to the left of any pallet, such as Highlighter Pens.
  • Rest the cursor on the name of a style, such as Blue Highlighter.
  • Click the arrow drop-down list that appears to the right of the style name (A).
  • Click the Shortcut key drop-down list (B).
  • Click any letter, such as B for Blue Highlighter (C).
  • Repeat these steps for additional styles.
  • Close the Highlighting panel.
  • Select text in a resource.
  • Press a newly created shortcut keystroke, such as B for the Blue Highlighter.
  • Notice that your selected text is now highlighted in blue!

Highlighting-shortcut.jpg

I encourage you to create shortcuts for the styles you use most often. This way you can read, select text, and press one key to mark it up. You don’t have to keep returning to the Highlighting panel and clicking a specific style.

If you enjoyed this tip, please check out Timesaving Tips volumes 1 and 2.

Logos 4: Horizontal View of Panels

mp|seminars Tips Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user contacted me recently, asking how to get a panel to span the width of his screen. In other words, he wanted a horizontal view rather than a vertical view. But regardless of how much he dragged the tabs of open panels, the panels wouldn’t stack one upon the other; instead, they stubbornly stayed side by side.

Here’s one way to accomplish what he requested:

  • Open three resources.
  • Notice that, by default, the first book opens in a vertical panel on the left (A), while the second appears in a right-hand panel (B) and the third joins an already-open panel in an existing tile (C).

  • Drag one of the tabs around the screen, noticing the blue highlighted section showing where a new panel will display once you let go of the mouse (D).

As you look carefully at the screen, note that the default panel display is vertical—both the initial arrangement and the subsequent rearrangement.

  • Choose the Layouts menu (E).
  • Click the predefined horizontal layout (middle one on bottom row) (F).

Notice that the open panels stack one upon the other, spanning the screen’s width. Now, as you drag tabs, you can rearrange panels in both a horizontal and a vertical view! Of course, you can resize the tiles by dragging their borders.

 

With this little trick, you can position the panels exactly where you want them.

Logos 4: Add Websites to the Logos Shortcuts Bar

mp|seminars Tips Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I was reminded this week that new users join the Logos family every day. And what is a “yesterday” tip for me (and perhaps for you too) is an “ah ha!” feature for a newcomer. With that in mind, I offer this oldie but goodie.

A Logos user contacted me recently, explaining that he used several websites in his Bible study and sermon preparation. Was there, he asked, an efficient way to jump from Logos to a website?

Yes, there is, and here’s how to implement it:

  • Open Logos and your web browser.
  • Arrange the Logos and the browser windows onscreen so that you can see both at once.
  • Navigate to a website.
  • Drag the website’s icon from the browser’s address bar to the Logos Shortcuts bar.
  • Repeat the above two steps for as many websites as you want.
  • Click a Logos shortcut icon to jump to that page.
  • Right click a shortcut icon and select Delete to remove it.

Websites to shortcuts bar example

Here are some suggested websites:

Remember that these shortcuts will synchronize to your other computers using Logos’ desktop version, so you only have to create them once.

What websites do you use when studying the Bible? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Shortcut to Passage List

mp|seminars Tips Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

It was my recent privilege to help a Logos user with the following scenario. As he studied a scriptural subject like angel of the Lord, he found himself redoing the phrase search each day of his research. He wanted to execute the search one time and then have quick access to the results any time he wanted whether his investigation lasted one day or one year. Here’s what we set up:

  • Open the Search panel.
  • Select Bible as the search type. (A)
  • Select the preferred Bible and ranges such as New American Standard Bible and All Passages from the drop-down lists. (B)
  • Type the search string, such as “angel of the Lord.” in the Find box . (C)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the search.

Shortcut-Passage-List-1.png

  • Choose the panel menu on the Search panel. (D)
  • Select Save as Passage List. (E)

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  • Rename the Passage List (if desired). (F)
  • Adjust the Bible(s) to display in the Passage List (if desired). (G)
  • Drag the Passage List tab to the Shortcuts bar. (H)

Shortcut-Passage-List-3.png

Now anytime you need access to that list, just click the new icon on the Shortcuts bar! When you’re finished with the shortcut, right-click it and select Delete. Even after you delete the icon, though, the Passage List stays safe, secure, and synchronized on the File menu.

Is there a particular subject you find yourself studying on a regular basis? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Multiple Translation Rings in the Bible Word Study Guide

I sometimes receive emails from Logos users asking about finding different search results for a Greek lemma (dictionary form of a word) when searching different Bibles. For example, a search for a Greek word in the NASB may yield three results, while the same search in the KJV only yields two hits.

Without going into a lot of detail or opinion about Greek texts (this Logos article offers much more information), I’ll point out that English-language Bibles are primarily based on one of two types of Greek texts: received text (KJV) and critical text (NASB). Some differences do exist between the two.

Here’s a way to search both families of Greek texts at the same time:

  • Choose Guides | Make a new guide template (New Guide Template for Mac)
  • Name the new guide anything you like, such as Multiple Rings (A)
  • Click Bible word since this guide will examine words, not verses (B)
  • Click Translation in the Individual Sections menu on the left (C)
  • Click the drop-down list in the Translation item on the right (D)
  • Select from the drop-down list an English-language Bible based on the received text such as the KJV (E)
  • Click Translation again in the Individual -Sections menu on the left (C)
  • Click the drop-down list in the Translation item on the right (F)
  • Select from the drop-down list an English-language Bible based on the critical text, such as the NASB (G)
  • Repeat these steps for as many Bibles as you’d like
  • Close the Template Editor (H)

Multiple-Rings-1.png

  • Open a English Bible with the reverse interlinear option, such as the ESV, KJV, LEB, NASB, NIV, NKJV, NLT, or NRSV
  • Navigate to a New Testament passage, such as Hebrews 12:3 (I)
  • Right-click on a word, such as “weary” (as translated in many Bibles) (J)
  • Select Lemma | “your new guide” such as Multiple Rings (K)

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Now notice the multiple translation rings on display, showing the manner and number of ways this Greek lemma is translated. In the “weary” example above, the word appears three times in the received text and twice in the critical text.

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If you enjoy this type of customization and original-language work, you’ll enjoy Camp Logos 2. This seminar focuses on personalizing your system for enhanced use and employing language tools—even if you’re not a Hebrew or Greek scholar.

Camp Logos 2 is available both in DVD format and in live seminars. Register today for one of these Camp Logos 2 Seminars slated for this fall:

Logos 4: Use Field Search to Find Background Information

My good friend Corey Howse, pastor of Connection Hill Primitive Baptist Church, recently asked me if there’s any way to create a collection of resources that facilitates finding background or introductory information for the individual books of the Bible. An excellent question—and I hope this suggestion helps out:

  • Create a collection of all your favorite resources (Tools | Collections) that contain such introductory information—study Bibles, commentaries, Bible dictionaries, Bible handbooks, etc. Don’t worry about a specific collection rule; just drag the books one at a time into the Plus these resources section of the Collections panel. (A)
  • Name the collection something like Book Context or Book Background. (B)

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  • Open the Search panel.
  • Select Basic as the Search type. (C)
  • Select the Book Context collection from the second drop-down list above the Search box. (D)
  • Click the first drop-down list above the Search box. From here, we select the specific portions of text in the resources that we want to search. (E)
  • Click the arrow to the left of the Search Fields option in the list. (A search field is like the name, address, phone, etc., sections on an order form. Logos divides the resource text in resources into various fields so that we don’t have to search all the text in a book, but can zero in on specific parts of the book.) (F)
  • Select the fields Large Text and Heading Text. (Depending on which resources you included in the collection, one or both of these fields will be present in the list. These fields usually include the headwords in dictionaries, chapter titles in books, etc. We’re only going to search the text in these fields, rather than all of the text in all the resources.) (G)

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  • Type the name of a biblical book, like Galatians, in the Search box. (H)
  • Press the Enter key.
  • Select By Title to arrange the search results by title.
  • Click the arrow to the left of any resource to reveal a link to introductory information for Galatians. (I)
  • Click the link to jump to that location! (J)

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Since this is probably a search you’ll execute over and over again add this power user step:

  • Drag the tab of the open Search panel (with results) to the Shortcuts bar.
  • Click the new Shortcuts icon each time you want to execute a Bible background search.

When the Search panel opens just type in the name of a biblical book and press the Enter key to locate that book’s background material!

Logos 4: Examples of Search Strings

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Logos Bible Software is beneficial not only because of the vast number of resources it provides us, but also because of its search and retrieval system, which allows us to mine those resources for just the information we need.

For example:

  • Open the search panel by clicking the Search icon. (1)
  • Select Bible as the search type. (2)
  • Select from the drop-down lists a range and Bible to be searched, like ESV and New Testament. (3)

Now type, one at a time, the following queries into the Search box and locate the information I describe below:

spirit to find the verses with the word spirit.

“holy spirit” to find the verses with the phrase Holy Spirit.

holy AND spirit to find the verses with both the words holy and spirit.

holy OR spirit to find the verses with either the word holy or the word spirit.

holy ANDNOT spirit to find the verses with the word holy but not the word spirit.

spirit ANDNOT (holy,god) to find the verses with the word spirit but not the words holy or god.

SearchStrings.jpg

If you prefer, you can:

  • Omit the AND operator. A search for holy spirit will find the verses with both the words holy and spirit.
  • Use a minus sign ( - ) for ANDNOT. A search for holy -spirit will find the verses with the word holy but not the word spirit.
  • Click the Search panel menu and select Match case to make the searches case-sensitive.

Happy searching!

How do you use search strings to find information? Leave a comment and let us know!

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