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Logos 5: What’s New in Logos 5

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I’m very privileged to be the authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. As such, you may think:

Morris has to be an enthusiastic cheerleader for whatever new feature Logos develops. Being excited about the software automatically comes with the training territory.

While I do eagerly try to apply most, if not all, of the Logos tools in my personal study, I must admit that my first reaction to Logos 5 was subdued. I liked the updated look with new icons, and I saw the new datasets, but I honestly asked myself if I would ever implement Logos 5′s new features in my study and sermon preparation. Was Logos 5 much ado about nothing?

Several months have passed since the initial release, and I now stand humbly corrected. The new Logos 5 features and datasets are incredible and practical!  There’s so much more to Logos 5 than just the new appearance.

I’ve used:

  • The Root word to help my understanding of restore in Galatians 6:1
  • The Bible Sense Lexicon to provide insights into beginning in Colossians 1:18
  • The Referent dataset to track down references to Barnabas
  • Biblical Events to discover verses (all throughout the Bible) that mention the Israelites crossing the Red Sea
  • The spreadsheet view of documents to organize my Logos files
  • Community Tags to be encouraged by Camp Logos 2 alumni applying the tagging system

So here’s my twofold encouragement:

  1. If you haven’t upgraded to Logos 5, please do so. You will not regret it.
  2. After upgrading, go to Tools | Bible Facts and build a report for a person, like David. The REFERRED TO AS section in the sidebar will more than justify your investment!

  3. If you’ve already upgraded to Logos 5, please place an order for the What’s New training DVD, which is now on Pre-Pub, but will ship very soon.
  4. This three-hour training disk focuses on the differences between Logos 4 and 5. In dozens of videos, placed in a hyperlinked menu and enhanced with highlighted screencasts, I personally walk you through Logos 5 features including:

  • Bible Sense Lexicon
  • Timeline
  • Bible Facts
  • Sermon Starter Guide
  • Topic Guide
  • Bibliography
  • Spreadsheet view of documents and guides
  • And much more

After investing three hours with this training guide, you’ll not only know but also use the new Logos 5 features.

See a sample video here.

If you prefer reading rather than watching, then please check out the What’s New Training Manual.

Logos 5: Sympathetic Highlighting

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently emailed the following to me:

When delivering a message on fellowship, pastors will often mention the “one another” verses as ways we are to serve/care/love one another (sometimes phrased as “one another,” as in “love one another,” and sometimes as “each other,” as in “bear each other’s burdens”).

I’d love to find a definitive list of all these verses. What’s the best way? I could do an English search, but that would vary per translation. Is there a way to do it using Greek?

Here’s my response:

You’re correct that the best search is in Greek rather than English. Let’s assume we don’t know any Greek, but want to search in Greek. Logos is here to help with a feature known as Sympathetic Highlighting:

  • Open an English Bible with the reverse interlinear option, like the ESV
  • Open a Greek Bible, like The Lexham Syntactic Greek NT 
  • Choose the panel menu on each Bible (A)
  • Select Link set A on each (B)

SH 1

  • Click the Visual Filters (three circles) icon on each Bible (C)
  • Select Sympathetic highlighting on each (D)

SH 2

  • Navigate to a “one another” verse, such as Romans 12:10, in one of the Bibles (E)
  • Select the phrase “one another” in the English Bible (F)
  • Notice that Logos automatically “highlights” the corresponding text in the Greek Bible (this is Sympathetic Highlighting) (G)
  • Note that this particular example is very interesting; the English phrase is actually only one word in Greek

SH 3

  • Right-click on the Greek word (H)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” | Search this resource (I)

SH 4

  • Notice that the search results are returned in Greek (J)
  • Click Verses on the search panel (K)
  • Click Add Versions on the search panel (L)

SH 5

  • Type abbreviations of desired Bibles in the Resources box to display the results both in Greek and in whatever English Bibles you want (separate multiple Bibles with commas) (M)
  • Press Enter to add the other Bible(s) to the display area

SH 6

I think this search will get most, if not all, of the “one another,” “each other,” etc., passages in the NT!

**If you like this Logos power-feature, you’ll enjoy the Camp Logos 2 DVD Training, in which Morris emphasizes original-language tools for the English student.

 

Logos 5: Search for Bible Facts in a Biblical Passage

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Bible Facts, located in the Tools menu in Logos 5, helps us investigate the Bible’s people, places, things, and events. You’ve probably discovered that you can enter text in its reference box to generate a report on a person, place, thing, or event.

You can also enter a biblical reference!

For example, imagine you’re studying Exodus 14, and you’d like to get an overview of that chapter’s people, places, things, and major events. Here’s all you do:

  • Choose Tools | Bible Facts
  • Type Exodus 14 in the reference box (A)
  • Note the dropdown list that appears, with all the subject matter from that chapter (B)
  • Select an item in the list to generate a report on it

I don’t know about you, but I like not having to type much!

 

Logos 5: Timeline Filter

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of the new Logos 5 datasets (contained in most base packages) is the Timeline, housed in the Tools menu. The hyperlinked Timeline contains events from both biblical and world history.

Currently, the dataset contains over 8,000 events (A), which can make for a cluttered display, especially if you’re looking for a specific event. This is why Logos includes a Filter box (B), allowing you to limit the displayed events. The box works very similarly to a search.

timeline filter image

For example, type:

    • Jacob to display only events containing the word Jacob

timeline filter image 2

    • Jacob OR Esau to display only events containing either the word Jacob or the word Esau

timeline filter image 3

    • Jacob AND Esau to display only events containing the words Jacob and Esau

timeline filter image 4

    • Jacob ANDNOT Esau to display only events containing the word Jacob but not the word Esau

timeline filter image 5

You can also use Find to jump to a specific event:

    • Press Ctrl + F or Cmd + F to open the Find box
    • Type a word in the box, like Isaac (A) 

timeline filter image 6

  • Notice that an event containing the word Isaac is centered in the Timeline
  • Use the previous & next arrows to jump to other events with the word Isaac

Please notice the difference between Filter and Find:

  • Filter limits the number of events currently being displayed on the Timeline
  • Find jumps to an event currently being displayed on the Timeline

You can use the Find feature by itself, or while you’re using the Filter box as well!

To learn more about the Timeline and all the other new Logos 5 features, check out the What’s New in Logos 5 training DVD, now available on Pre-Pub.

Logos 5: Back and Forward Keystrokes

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Navigating in Logos 5

Sometimes we need to retrace our steps in Logos. For example, perhaps Nave’s Topical Bible is open to an article on sanctification, and we jump to the entry on holiness. (A)

Nave's image 1

Now we want to return to the previous article. No worries. We can use the back and forward arrows in the upper-right-hand corner to relive our local history in this panel. (B)

Nave's image 2

Our reports created with guides, however, present a different challenge. Imagine we generated an Exegetical Guide report for Ephesians 3.17. (C)

Exegetical Guide image 1

Now, we create a report for Galatians 2.20. (D)

Exegetical Guide image 2

For whatever reason, we want to return to the Ephesians 3.17 report. You’ll notice that there are no back and forward arrows on the Exegetical Guide panel. Again, no worries. Our guides still keep track of the local history; we just have to access it with these keystrokes:

PC
Back: Alt + left arrow
Forward: Alt + right arrow

Mac
Back: Cmd + left bracket
Forward: Cmd + right bracket

In other words, in the above example, while in the Galatians 2:20 report, press Alt + left arrow or Cmd + left bracket and you’ll return to the Ephesians 3.17 report!

Logos 5: Lexham Bible Dictionary

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In addition to working with numerous publishers to make their print volumes into ebooks, Logos publishes its own resources under the Lexham brand. You may have noticed resources like:

  • Lexham English Bible
  • Lexham Hebrew Bible
  • Lexham Greek-English Interlinear New Testament: SBL Edition (try rapidly repeating that title three times!)

Another very helpful resource contained in all the new Logos 5 base packages is the Lexham Bible Dictionary (LBD). This topical encyclopedia, developed for digital rather than print delivery, contains thousands of in-depth articles covering a multitude of biblical subjects. In addition, new articles are being written and added to the book through Logos’ automatic “update resources” process.
If you’ve yet to discover and use this volume, try this:

  • Open your library 
  • Click Prioritize (A)
  • Type LBD in the library’s Find box (B)
  • Drag the resource from the left to the Prefer these resources list on the right (C) so that the LBD is the highest-prioritized English dictionary in the list
  • Close the library (D)

 

  • Open a Bible to a passage, such as Acts 18 (E)
  • Double-click a word, like Corinth in verse 1 (F) (the double click is the shortcut for the Lookup feature, which aptly means “look up my word in a dictionary”)
  • Notice that the LBD jumps to an article about Corinth (G)
     

 

As you use the LBD, you’ll discover that it arranges articles in a very user-friendly outline format so that you can easily see and navigate to specific information.

Since the LBD is relatively new, it doesn’t contain articles for every biblical subject (yet!), so make sure to prioritize your second-favorite Bible dictionary under the LBD in the library. This way, if the LBD doesn’t have an article about your topic, this backup Bible dictionary will open when you double-click a word.
Also, you can double-click words in more than just Bibles. Try double-clicking the names of people, places, and things in other resources, such as commentaries (H), and watch your Bible dictionary instantly open! (I)

*  *  *

Introductory discounts for upgrading to Logos 5 end February 4. See the special pricing our Custom Upgrade Discount Calculator has for you.

Logos 5: Sense in Word by Word

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

As you well know, many words in the English language have multiple meanings. For example, trunk could refer to an elephant’s nose, an automobile’s storage compartment, a part of a tree, or a big case for saving things. The word’s context determines its precise meaning.

The biblical languages of Hebrew and Greek are no different. Some words have multiple meanings. For example, the Greek word kosmos, usually translated world, could mean the planet Earth, the people on the planet, or the philosophy of the people on the planet. When John 3.16 declares God so loved the world, which meaning of world is correct?

In an attempt to identify the contextual meanings of Hebrew and Greek words, Logos developed the Bible Sense Lexicon, located on the Tools menu in some of the Logos 5 base packages.

Perhaps the most useful application of this feature is in the Word by Word section in the Exegetical Guide. For example:

  • Choose Guides | Exegetical Guide.
  • Type John 3.16 in the reference box. (A)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.
  • Navigate to the Word by Word section. (B)
  • Click the word world (C) on the right-hand side of the big gray box, which takes you to the entry for the Greek kosmos. (D)

Find Bible Sense in Word by Word

 

  • Notice the line of information called Sense (E), followed by a definition.
  • Click the link to open the Bible Sense Lexicon. (F)

Exegetical guide Bible Sense Definition

 

The Sense definition is a specific, contextual definition for the Greek kosmos. This word may have 12 different meanings, but the Content Innovation Team (CIT) at Logos believes that in John 3.16, it means world populace!

Currently the CIT has tagged the majority of Hebrew and Greek nouns, but it will be adding other parts of speech in the future. The new Sense line of information goes a long way in helping us disambiguate the meanings of biblical words.

Three cheers for the CIT!

Logos 5: Sermon Starter Guide

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

The Sermon Starter Guide, a new Logos 5 template located in the Guides menu, jumpstarts (not replaces) your message preparation. When you generate a report for a biblical theme or text, you’ll notice two important sections: Theme and Thematic Outlines. I wanted to make sure you know the mechanics of these two very helpful sections.

Undergirding all Sermon Starter Guide reports are approximately 230 popular preaching themes, identified by the Content Innovation Team (CIT) at Logos.

When you generate a report for a topic or theme, the Theme section provides a brief description of that specific theme or one closely related to it.

When you generate a report for a passage, the Theme section displays descriptions of all the themes that use your biblical reference as a key supporting passage. For example, if you build a guide for Colossians 3:16, you’ll see both Education and Music presented under the Theme section.

SSG Theme

 

The Thematic Outlines section uses the Dictionary of Bible Themes (DBT) as a source.

SSG Title Page

 

When you generate a report for a topic or theme, the Thematic Outlines section presents all the outlines from DBT containing your topic or a similar one as a part of the title of the outline. For example, if you build a report for the theme God:Wrath, you’ll see these titles under Thematic Outlines: Anger of God; Anger of Jesus Christ; Anger, divine; and Provoking God.

SSG Thematic Outlines

 

When you generate a report for a passage, the Thematic Outlines section presents all the outlines from DBT containing your passage somewhere in the outline. For example, when you create a guide for Deuteronomy 1:42, you’ll see these outlines under Thematic Outlines: Alienation, Defeat, Nature of sin, and Nature of warfare.

SSG Thematic

 

I certainly hope these behind-the-scenes explanations are helpful. Also, as former news anchor Dan Rather would say, a tip of the Stetson to the CIT for its hard work in compiling all of this useful data!

Logos 5: Links to the Timeline

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Scattered throughout many Logos resources are dates of specific historical events. Logos is in the process of hyperlinking many of these dates to the new, searchable Timeline, found in most of the new base packages.

Here’s an example of how the links work:

  • Type 131 in the Command box.
  • In the drop down list, click Open 131 Christians Everyone Should Know to open this resource.
  • Type 35 in the resource’s reference box. (A)
  • Press the Enter key to jump to that page.
  • Click the Visual Filters icon (B) on the resource’s toolbar.
  • Select Timeline events.
  • In the book scroll to page 35, subsection “Here I stand.” (C)
  • Notice, in the first sentence, a blue flag (D) next to the year 1517.
  • Rest the cursor on the flag to see a popup description of the event. (E)
  • Click the blue flag (D) to open the Timeline to that specific event.
  • Notice, back on page 35, a white flag next to the year 1519. (F)
  • Click the white flag to jump to the year 1519 on the Timeline.

Links to Timeline

The blue flags in resources represent specific events on the Timeline, whereas white flags just represent dates on the Timeline with no specific events assigned to them.

Timeline

Of course, you can open the Timeline anytime you want from the Tools menu.

Logos 5: Popular Highlights

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In Logos 5, several features connect us to other Logos users: Community Tags, Community Ratings, sharing with Faithlife Groups, etc. Another community feature, Popular Highlights, appears throughout our resources. This new visual filter reveals how others mark up the text.

For example:

  • Open the daily devotional My Utmost for His Highest.
  • Note the gray underlining, followed by the number of highlights, scattered throughout the book. (A)

Example of popular highlighting in My Utmost for His Highest book

These markers merely show frequently highlighted text in the Logos community; all specific user info is anonymous. You may be encouraged to see the insights others found helpful, or you may wish to disable Popular Highlights.

To hide Popular Highlights in one resource:

  • Click the visual filters icon (A) on the resource’s toolbar.
  • Uncheck Popular Highlights. (B)

Hide popular highlights in one resource

To hide Popular Highlights in all resources:

  • Click the visual filters icon (A) on a resource’s toolbar.
  • Right-click on Popular highlights. (B)
  • Select Do not show in any resources. (C)

Hide popular highlights in all resources

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