Logos 4: Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

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Surrounded by eager observers at a local church, a Logos representative gave a detailed and exciting demonstration of Logos Bible Software. He thoroughly explained the Home Page, the Passage Guide, the Exegetical Guide, Bible Word Study, searching, and more. Following the presentation, an attendee remarked—

This program looks powerful and wonderful! I do have one question, though—What is a commentary?

This event illustrates an important point. Sometimes within Christian circles we may innocently assume everyone is operating from the same knowledge base. Surely everyone is familiar with Christian vocabulary and resources. We all know what redemption means. We all know where the Bible came from. We all know what commentaries, study Bibles, and lexicons are.

Of course, when we stop and think about it, we know this isn’t true. We have to start at the beginning, then learn and grow in any field of study—including our Christian disciplines.

With this in mind, we created the training video  Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software. In this instruction, I assume no prior knowledge of either Logos or the Bible itself.

In understandable terms, I explain what the Bible is, where it came from, and what distinguishes the various available Bibles. I then briefly describe numerous Bible study resources: commentaries, Bible dictionaries, topical Bibles, and more.

In addition, I introduce you to various ways of approaching Bible study, including:

  • Book Study
  • Passage Study
  • Word Study
  • Topic Study
  • Devotional Study

Then, at the heart of the training, I show you how to incorporate many Logos features into the five methods of Bible study listed above. In other words, with this training you’ll not only learn what a book study is—you’ll learn how to use Logos to accomplish it. This instruction not only introduces you to Bible study, it gets you going with Logos.

After completing this training, you’ll no longer just open Logos and randomly click around the software. You’ll proactively and systematically move through the software to facilitate different types of Bible study.

So if you’re new to either Logos or Bible study itself (or even both), this product was created with you in mind.

Even if you’re beyond the introduction stage, perhaps you know someone who can benefit from this training. This is an excellent way to get people started in their study of Scripture.

Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software is now available to pre-order at Logos.com. For more information, please click here.

What is one area of your Bible study that you would like to improve in? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Locate Greek Words in an English Bible

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

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One of the many powerful aspects of Logos is its ability to take us English students back to the original languages of the Bible, even though we may not be language scholars. Logos accomplishes this through the reverse interlinear option. Many of the questions I receive are related to the reverse interlinear, such as this one a Logos user recently sent:

How do I search for 2 Greek words within proximity of each other?  For example:
grace WITHIN 5 words righteousness (grace and righteousness in original languages)

I answered a similar question a few months ago in a blog, but since this is a common question I’ll address it again from a slightly different angle.

  • Open an English Bible (containing the reverse interlinear) to a passage, such as Colossians 1:2, containing the first word you want to locate. (1)
  • Right click on a word such as grace . (2)
  • Select Lemma | Search this resource. (3)(4)
  • Take the Bible to a passage, such as Matthew 3:15, containing your second word.
  • Right click on your word such as righteousness.
  • Select Lemma | Search this resource.
  • Notice you now have two search panels open.
  • Add this text to the search query in the first search panel: WITHIN 5 words.
  • Copy and paste the search query text from the second search panel to the first.
  • Make sure the query looks like this: 
    LocateGreekWords-example.jpg
  • Use the drop down lists to adjust the search ranges.
  • Press the Enter key to initiate the search.

LocateGreek1.jpg

 

LocateGreekWords2.jpg

 

LocateGreekWords3.jpg

Logos now locates all the occurrences of these two Greek words within five words of each other—in your English Bible!

Please note these very important observations:

If the search type is set to Bible then both terms have to be in the same verse!

If the search type is set to Basic then both terms have to be in the same chapter!

If you enjoyed this tip about using English Bibles to accomplish original language work, then you’ll benefit from Camp Logos Live 2 DVD training which highlights numerous ways for English students to dig into Hebrew and Greek using Logos.

How has digging into the Hebrew and Greek helped your study of the Bible? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Identify English Words Added By Bible Translators

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

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A Logos user recently emailed me the following question:

From Logos Bible Software, how can one know which parts of the English Bible are not from the original language,  but were added in by translators?

If you’re new to the Bible please don’t be concerned about this question. The Old Testament was originally written (primarily) in Hebrew while the New Testament was recorded in Greek. Our English Bibles are translations of these Hebrew and Greek texts.

Sometimes Bible translators, for various reasons, will both insert extra English words and not translate all Hebrew and Greek words. The Logos reverse interlinear feature, found in numerous English Bibles, clearly identifies these instances.

  • Open an English Bible containing the reverse interlinear information such as the ESV.
  • Click Display | Inline on the Bible’s toolbar. (1)
  • Navigate to a passage such as Matthew 6:1 . (2)

Indentify-English-Words1.png

The English words, such as other in verse 1, with a dot / bullet underneath them have been added by the translators. The Hebrew / Greek words, such as the one to the right of beware in verse 1, with a dot / bullet above them on the English line have NOT been translated in this specific English Bible.

Indentify-English-Words2.png

As you can see, the reverse interlinear is trying to account for every word, both in the original text and the English Bible.

Other English Bibles containing this reverse interlinear option include: NASB, KJV,  NKJV,  LEB, NRSV, NIV (NT only) and NLT (NT only).

For more detailed information about the reverse interlinear option, please see Camp Logos Live, our two-day seminar that we brought to DVD-ROM.

For more information about the basics of Bible study, like the Logos user’s question above, please see our newest video training project, Introduction to Bible Study with Logos Bible Software.

How do you use the reverse interlinear to study the Bible? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: All the Questions in the Bible

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.mp|seminars Tips

Over the past few months several Logos users have emailed asking if it’s possible to search for questions in the Bible. In other words, can we search for punctuation marks? Currently we cannot. If, however, you want to see a list of questions in the Bible, the heavy lifting has been already done for you with the book All the Questions in the Bible(which is contained in most Logos base collections). The compiler of the resource lists all of the questions in the King James Version book by book.

  • Open the Library.
  • Type in the Library’s Find box author:hancock.
  • Click the book All the Questions in the Bible to open it.
  • Choose the resource’s panel menu and select Show table of contents.
  • Click a book of the Bible in the contents pane to jump to that location in the resource and to see a list all the questions in that specific book!

As you can see, All the Questions in the Bible, is really a lot of verse lists based on the KJV that have been compiled into one resource!

If you want, you can use this book to make your own Passage Lists based on any version of the Bible you like:

  • Choose File | Passage List.
  • Name the list something like Questions in James.
  • Open All the Questions in the Bible to the section All the Questions in James.
  • Select all of the text in the James section in the resource.
  • Choose the Add drop down list on the Passage List.
  • Select Add Passages from selected text.
  • Select the Bible(s) in the Passage List from which you wish to display the verses.

AllQuestions-Blog.png

All the verses from resource are now in your own customized Passage List! Of course repeat these steps for additional books of the Bible.

What is the most difficult question in the Bible? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Passage in All Versions

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.mp|seminars Tips

A Logos user recently sent me the following question:

Logos 3 (Libronix) had a feature called Passage in All Versions which listed a biblical text from any Bibles I wanted. Is that feature in Logos 4?

Here’s my response:

Yes! It’s actually housed in Text Comparison located on the Tools menu.

  • Choose the Tools menu.
  • Drag Text Comparison to any location on the screen.
  • Choose the panel menu on Text Comparison. (1)
    • Select Vertical Layout. (2)
    • De-select Show base text (3) and Show differences (4) (these options don’t appear in all of the Logos base collections).
  • Choose the desired Bibles to display by typing Bible abbreviations in the Bible box separating them with commas (ESV,NKJV,NASB,NIV) or selecting them from the drop down list. (5)
  • Type a biblical reference in the verse box (Luke 11.1-5). (6)
  • Press the Enter key to display the passage from the selected Bibles.

passage-all-versions1.jpg

To automatically display the passage from an active Bible tab:

  • Open a Bible.
  • Choose the panel menu on both the Bible and Text Comparison. (7)
  • Select Link set: A on both panel menus. (8)

passage-all-versions2.jpg

Navigate to a location in the Bible and noticeText Comparisonautomatically displays the biblical passage from all of the selected Bibles!

What are your favorite Bible translations to study with? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Create a Shortcut to The Biblical World Map

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

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Within the past few weeks I’ve received several emails regarding Biblical Places and maps within Logos 4. This blog summarizes some of the instruction I passed along to fellow Logos users.

Prior to the release of Logos 4, the Logos company commissioned the creation of numerous new maps which only appear in the Bible Facts tool, Biblical Places. These new Logos 4 maps are NOT displayed as a separate resource in the Library. In other words, if you want to see a new Logos 4 map for Corinth then generate a Biblical Places report for that city.

One of the new Logos 4 maps, The Biblical World, is somewhat dynamic or interactive in that it hides or shows locations depending on the size of the image:

  • Choose Tools | Biblical Places.
  • Type a city like Ephesus in the Place box. (1)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.
  • Click The Biblical World map in the “filmstrip” at the bottom to display that map. (2)
  • Zoom out or in on the image to show or hide different locations.
    • Windows: Press Ctrl + + or Ctrl + - to zoom out or in.
    • Mac: Use the scroll feature on your mouse or touchpad to zoom out or in.

ShortcutBiblicalWorldMap.jpg

To center The Biblical World map on a specific a location:

  • Type a location like Athens in the Place box.
  • Press the Enter key.
  • Notice The Biblical World map automatically adjusts placing the desired location in the center of the window.

To save The Biblical World map as a Favorite or Bookmark:

  • Choose Tools | Favorites.
  • Make sure The Biblical World map is displayed in the Biblical Places window.
  • Drag the Biblical Places tab to the Favorites area or on top of a Bookmark number.
  • Click either the Favorite or Bookmark to open Biblical Places right to the The Biblical World map.

To place The Biblical World map on the Shortcuts bar:

  • Save The Biblical World map as a Favorite or Bookmark as explained above.
  • Drag the Favorite or Bookmark link from the Favorites / Bookmarks pane to the Shortcuts bar.
  • Click the new Shortcuts icon to always open Biblical Places to the The Biblical World map (if you just drag the Biblical Places tab from the Logos desktop to the Shortcuts bar the new icon will always open Biblical Places to its last location not  The Biblical World map).

Having The Biblical World map as a shortcut icon gives you instant access to this basic albeit interactive map so you can quickly see a desired location!

What map do you think is the most interesting? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Instant Concordance for Any Resource

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

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In the daily devotional, My Utmost for His Highest, Oswald Chambers refers to Abraham in the entry for March 27. After reading and reflecting on this passage, I wondered to myself if Chambers mentions Abraham elsewhere in My Utmost. I discovered the answer was just a right click away as I followed these simple steps:

  • Right click on the word Abraham . (1)
  • Select Selection Abraham | Search this resource. (2)(3)

The search panel opens revealing 24 hits in 11 articles. I spent a few minutes going through the hits enjoying a mini-topic study in this one book!

instant-concordance.jpg

Here’s what I want you to glean from this blog. The right mouse click doesn’t just provide an instant concordance for every Bible in our library, but for every book in our library! We don’t have to be in a Bible to enjoy the benefits of the right click “context sensitive” menu. Try right clicking in any book you’re reading to discover what else the resource has to say about your word or phrase (for phrase searching first select or highlight the phrase and then right click on the highlighted phrase).

For example, search for:

I think you’ll discover that seeing what a specific resource or author says about a word or phrase can be quite rewarding.

What word or passage have you found to be the most interesting to study? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Visual Filter for a Greek Lemma

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

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In response to a recent blog about Visual Filters a Logos user e-mailed the following to me:

I am enjoying very much your “how to” explanations in Logostalk, especially the recent post about using visual filters.  I have begun to create my own and I am very interested in this functionality. 

What I would like to know is how can I create a visual filter for a Greek word and have the filter show up on the translated English word.  For instance, I would like to create a visual filter for the Greek word “epignosis” and have the English word highlighted.

Here’s what I told him:

The easiest way to produce the filter for a Greek word and have it highlighted in English is to generate a Greek lemma search:

  • Open an English Bible (which contains the reverse interlinear option such as ESV, NASB, NKJV, or LEB) to a location where your desired word appears, in this case Colossians 1:6
  • Right click on the word (1) and select Lemma  “your word” | Search this resource. (2) (3)
  • Click Make filter on the Search panel which opens the Visual Filter panel with your search term already entered. (4)
  • Select a Formatting style for the word and name the filter. (5) (6)

Logos searches the underlying Greek text in the English Bible with the reverse interlinear data and then highlights the corresponding English text!

To add additional words to this same filter, so you don’t end up with a different filter for each individual word (because each time you click Make filter Logos creates a new visual filter):

  • Execute a lemma search as explained above
  • Copy / paste the search query from the search panel to the Visual Filter panel. (7)
  • Select a Formatting style for this new entry. (8)

VisualFilterForLemma1.jpg

 

VisualFilterForLemma2.jpg

 

VisualFilterForLemma3.jpg

Of course, the same instructions apply to a Hebrew lemma in the Old Testament.

This type of Visual Filter is a great way to distinguish Hebrew or Greek synonyms which are translated with the same English word. For example, create filters for the various Hebrew words translatedpraise. Make filters for the different Greek words translated love.

This is but one of the many features we discuss in the Camp Logos 2 Live video training series, which emphasizes using original language tools for the English student.

How do you use visual filters to study the Biblical text? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: Locate Hebrew or Greek Synonyms for a Biblical Word

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

A Logos user recently emailed this question to me:

Is there a way I can search the Bible to find every synonym for “sin”?

The answer is a resounding yes and we get to use one of my favorite Logos features: the Translation ring in the Bible Word Study.

  • Choose Guides | Bible Word Study.
  • Type sin in the Word box. (1)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.

The Hebrew Words and Greek Words sections display all of the Hebrew and Greek words translated sin in the Bible of your choice (as indicated on the blue section title bar). In essence these are the synonyms for sin in the Bible. Of course this exercise is not picking up Hebrew and Greek words translated trespassoffence, etc. which also could be synonyms for sin.

  • Click a Hebrew or Greek word outside the ring to list the verses in which that word is translated sin. (2)
  • Click the Hebrew or Greek lemma next to the word count to generate a report for that word. (3)

Notice the Translation ring in this second report displays the various ways this Hebrew or Greek lemma is translated in English, again in the Bible of your choice. (4)

BWS-for-Sin.jpg

By going around the Hebrew and Greek rings in the first report, we can open additional Bible Word Study reports for each word, thereby being well on our way to a biblical understanding of the original concept, in this case sin.

How do you use the translation ring in the Bible Word Study tool? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos 4: A Greek Visual Filter for the English Student

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

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Thank you for reading this blog. Now here’s a question. Did I just thank you, an individual reader, or did I thank you all as the collective group of readers? In other words, is the you singular or plural? You can’t answer decisively because you in English can be either. The language of the New Testament, Greek, makes a distinction between singular and plural pronouns, but not all English Bibles maintain that distinction. They use you for both singular and plural occurrences.

For example, Luke 22:31-32 is translated as follows in the NASB:

“Simon, Simon, behold, Satan has demanded permission to sift you like wheat; but I have prayed for you…”

Are these you’s singular or plural or both? Impossible to say for certain just by observing English. A Morphological Visual Filter, however, can help us easily answer the question.

  • Choose File | Visual Filter.
  • Select Morph as the filter type (1).
  • Select from the drop down lists All Morph Text, New Testament, All Resources, and Logos Greek Morphology (2).
  • Type the @ symbol in the Find box which alerts Logos that this is going to be a Morph search (3).
  • Select Pronoun from  the Part of Speech drop down list (4).
  • Select Singular from the Number column (5).
  • Click the arrow icon to save the morph code in the Find box (6).
  • Select from the Formatting list a style such as Box (7).
  • Type the @ symbol in the additional Find box that appears (8).
  • Select Pronoun from  the Part of Speech drop down list (9).
  • Select Plural from the Number column (10).
  • Click the arrow icon to save the morph code in the Find box (11).
  • Select from the Formatting list a style such as Double Box (12).

GreekVisualFilter1.jpg

 

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You have just instructed Logos to place a box around all singular pronouns and a double box around all plural pronouns in the New Testament of Bibles containing the Logos Greek Morphology. Now open an English Bible like the ESV, NASB, NKJV, or LEB to Luke 22:31The filtering on the underlying Greek morphology is shining through to the English surface text which certainly assists our study of any passage!

GreekVisualFilter4.jpg

Do you see anything interesting in Luke 22:31-32?

If you enjoy this type of power usage of Logos then you’ll find Camp Logos 2 Live DVD Training very helpful. It’s packed full of instruction and application on how to use Logos original language features for the English student.

How can understanding the Greek meaning of a word help your study of the Bible in English? Leave a comment and let us know!