Logos 5: Reorder Books in a Collection

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In a recent blog post about displaying a verse from all Bibles, I suggested creating a collection of English Bibles. This suggestion in turn generated some discussion about the order of books in a collection. If you’ve created a collection from the Tools menu, you’ve noticed that Logos alphabetizes the resources in a collection.

To illustrate, in a theology-books collection, Baker’s Dictionary of Practical Theology appears before Concise Theology because B is of course before C (A).

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When using this collection, therefore, in a search, the Baker results appear before the Concise hits (B).

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The question then is, how can we move the Concise ahead of the Baker yet leave them both in the collection? The answer is: rename Concise. This method is a little tedious, but it does accomplish the goal.

  • Click the Library icon
  • Click the Resource information icon on the library’s toolbar (C)
  • Type title:theology in the library’s Find box to display resources with theology in the title (D)
  • Click something other than the title of Concise Theology in the viewing area (E) to display the book in the Resource information pane (F)
  • Click the Edit (pencil) icon next to the title in the Resource information pane (G)
  • Type the numeral 1 in front of the title in the Edit box so the name of the book is now 1 Concise Theology (H)

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  • Press the Enter key to save the name
  • Repeat this process with other theology books using the numerals 2, 3, 4 etc. (I)

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  • Close the Library
  • Choose Tools | Collections
  • Name the collection Theology Books (J)
  • In the Rule box, type title:theology to list resources with theology in the title (K)
    (Please note: this is not a complete rule to locate all theology books, but used just for illustration purposes.)
  • Notice that the resources with numbers in their names are now at the top of the list (L)

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To see this newly ordered collection in action, generate a basic search in Theology Books and notice which books appear at the top of the list! (M)

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Of course, you can use this same method to reorder books in any collection, such as History Books, Ethics Books, or others. This method ensures that your favorite books always appear at the top of your search results.

Logos 5: Locate Words and Phrases in Proximity to One Another

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

In addition to coaching people in the use of Logos Bible Software, one of my greatest joys is encouraging biblical communicators toward true expository preaching. Exposing the original intent of a scriptural passage along with contemporary application is a powerful combination!

Toward that end, a Logos user recently asked me how he could search his library for various definitions of expository preaching.

This is an excellent question that can be answered with a proximity search combining words and phrases:

  • Open the Search panel (A)
  • Select Basic as the search type (B)
  • Select Entire Library from the resources drop-down list (C)
  • Type this text in the Find box: (definition,define) WITHIN 3 words “expository preaching” (D)

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  • Choose the search panel menu (E)
  • Select Match all word forms (F)

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  • Press the Enter key to generate the search results (G)

The search query instructs Logos to locate all the occurrences of the words define, defines, defined, defining, definition, or definitions within three words of the phrase expository preaching!

Clicking a hyperlinked search result opens the resource right to an author’s definition of expository preaching. (H)

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Here are some details regarding the search query:

  • The parentheses group terms together
  • The comma within the parentheses represents an OR search, meaning any of the terms present constitutes a hit
  • Match all word forms locates the various forms of define, saving us from having to type them individually
  • The double quotes around the words expository preaching indicate an exact phrase
  • The command WITHIN means the words can appear before or after the phrase
  • The term words designates the context in which the words and phrases must appear
  • The number 3 defines the specific contextual range in which the words and phrases must appear

Please experiment with this query, because joining the proximity search with words and phrases enables us to locate information with precision.

If this was helpful to you, check out our Logos 5 Training Manual Set, which contains greatly expanded explanations of Logos searching.

Logos 5: Cross‑References for Topics

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

One of the most popular types of Bible study enjoyed by many Christians is cross-reference work. Toward that end, most English Bibles provide some cross-references inline with the biblical text.

If you enjoy this method of Bible investigation, you may find that those embedded cross-references are limited. So if you’d like to look up more biblical references for a given topic, try this setup that incorporates several Logos features:

  • Click the Library icon to open your electronic bookshelf (A)
  • Click Prioritize in the upper right corner of the library (B)

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  • Type nave in the Library’s Find box (C)
  • Drag New Nave’s Topical Bible to the Prefer these resources list (make sure this resource is in the top five of your topical prioritized books, such as dictionaries and encyclopedias) (D)

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  • Open an English Bible, such as The Lexham English Bible (E)
  • Navigate in the Bible to a passage containing a topic of interest, such as Colossians 2:14 (F)

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  • Right click on a word in the verse, such as cross (G)
  • Click Selection: cross on the right side of the context menu (H)
  • Select New Nave’s Topical Bible on the left side of the context menu (I)

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  • Notice this resource opens to an article containing numerous cross-references for the topic cross (J)
  • Rest the cursor on a blue Bible cross-reference to see a popup of that verse from your preferred Bible (K)

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  • Click a blue Bible cross-reference to open your preferred Bible to that verse

To see multiple cross-references at once, add this to your study:

  • Choose Tools | Power Lookup
  • Select some text containing cross-references in Nave’s (L)
  • Notice that Power Lookup displays the biblical text for all of those selected cross-references (M)

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If you find yourself using this setup frequently, make sure to save it as layout.

For more helpful instruction about Logos tools, please check out the two-volume Logos 5 Training Manual Set.

Logos 5: Display a Verse from All Bibles

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Recently I was reading Revelation 3:20 in the ESV, where Jesus says:

“Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in to him and eat with him, and he with me.”

I noticed in to being used as the phrase, rather than the word into. To refresh my English grammar, I quickly looked up the difference between in to and into.

I then wanted to see how this verse is worded in all of my English Bibles. There are several ways to accomplish this task in Logos, but I’ll show you what I did that evening in my personal study.

First, I created a collection of English Bibles, then I used Text Comparison to display Revelation 3:20 from that collection:

  • Choose Tools | Collections
  • Name the collection “English Bibles” (A)
  • Type this text in the Rule box: type:bible AND lang:english, which encompasses resources categorized in the library as Bibles published in the English language (B)
  • Close the Collections panel (C)

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  • Choose the Tools menu
  • Right click Text Comparison (D)
  • Select Open in a floating window (E)

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  • Type Revelation 3:20 in the Reference box (F)
  • Select English Bibles from the Resources drop-down list (G)

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  • Choose the Text Comparison panel menu (H)
  • Select Vertical layout (I)

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Notice that Logos displays a list of that one verse from all the English Bibles you own!

If you’d like to continue this study, use the Search tool to locate all the occurrences of both the phrase in to and the word into in your Bible.

If you enjoy these weekly tips, please check out the two-volume Logos 5 Training Manual Set, which teaches you how to get the most out of your software.

Logos 5: Record Your Answers in Logos Resources

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

Have you noticed that much of our learning takes places through a question and answer model? When I became a Christian disciple in college, my pastor began mentoring me with the Design for Discipleship series from The Navigators. Using study guides filled with questions, I would read the Scripture and then record my answers in the space provided in the guides.

Logos tries to replicate this question and answer experience with text entry boxes scattered throughout numerous Logos resources.

Allow me to give you a specific example:

  • Click the title of the book in the list underneath the Command box to open it (B)

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  • Type 150 in the resource’s reference box (C)

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  • Press the Enter key to jump to page 150 (D)
  • Scroll until you see the section called Questions for Reflection (E)
  • Notice the text entry boxes underneath the questions (F)

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  • Type your desired text in the boxes just like you would record answers on lines in study guides (G)

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Currently this text is not searchable, but it does synchronize between your devices.

Be on the lookout for these text entry boxes all throughout your Logos resources, especially the ones containing questions!

If you enjoy these weekly tips, check out the Logos Bible Software Training Manual Bundle (print edition), which contains hundreds of pages on getting the most out of your software.

Logos 5: See Synonyms in Bible Word Study

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently presented me with this scenario:

As I was reading Luke 4:5 where Satan showed Jesus the kingdoms of the world, I was a little surprised to notice the Greek word for “world” was not “kosmos”, the word normally used for “world” in the New Testament. Is there a quick way to see all of the Greek words translated with the same English word?

This is an excellent question, and the answer is a resounding yes!

Using the above example, I’ll show you how to access a quick list of synonyms for world:

  • Open an English Bible with the reverse-interlinear option, such as the ESV (A)
  • Navigate to Luke 4:5 (B)
  • Right click the word world (C)
  • Select Selection world | Bible Word Study (D)

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  • Scroll in the newly generated report to the section called Greek Words (E)
  • Notice the English word world in the center of the translation ring (F) and the Greek words around the ring, which are the words translated world in the ESV New Testament (G)
  • Click a Greek word to see a list of verses in which that specific Greek word is translated world (H)

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  • Click the Greek lemma right above the list of verses (I) to generate a separate Bible Word Study report for that word (J)

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In essence, the Hebrew Words and Greek Words sections are displaying synonyms in the Old and New Testaments respectively for the word world. By studying all of these original words, you’ll gain a thorough understanding of the concept of world in the Bible.

If you enjoyed this tip, check out the Camp Logos 1 and 2 training videos for more original-language tips for English students.

Logos 5: Use the Exegetical Guide Verse by Verse

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

The Exegetical Guide houses one of my favorite Logos features, the Word by Word section, which analyzes each Hebrew or Greek word in a passage. Among the wealth of information found here are the manuscript and lemma forms of words, morphological and syntactical data, links to lexicons, and the meaning of the original words as suggested in the Bible Sense Lexicon dataset (not contained in all Logos base packages). Much of my personal Bible study and sermon preparation is spent in this invaluable section.

Word by Word will automatically investigate every word in every verse we’re studying if we like, but this comprehensive coverage can make for a lengthy report. For example, if we’re examining Joshua 1:1–9, the Word by Word section displays data for all nine verses at once! Thus, you may find yourself scrolling through a long list of words.

Here’s a little trick I employ with the Exegetical Guide so that I only research one verse at a time, yet I never have to type anything to move to another verse:

  • Open a Bible containing the reverse interlinear option such as The Lexham English Bible (A)
  • Choose the panel menu on the Bible (B)
  • Select a Link set letter, such as A (C)

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  • Choose Guides | Exegetical Guide
  • Choose the panel menu on the Exegetical Guide (D)
  • Select the same Link set letter you just selected for the Bible (E)

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  • Type in the Bible’s reference box the first verse in the passage you’re about to study, such as Joshua 1:1 (F)
  • Notice that the Exegetical Guide follows the Bible to the same verse because both panels are linked to the same set (G)
  • Observe that the Word by Word section is only examining the words in that one verse (H)

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  • Choose the panel menu of the Bible (I)
  • Select Show locator bar (J)

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  • Notice the locator bar, appearing under the Bible’s toolbar, contains previous and next arrows (K)

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  • Click the drop-down list to the left of the previous and next arrows (L)
  • Select Verse (M)

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  • Note that you have just set the previous and next arrows to take you to the previous or next verse in the Bible
  • Click the next (down) arrow (N)
  • Watch the Bible AND the Exegetical Guide move to the next verse, such as Joshua 1:2 (O)
  • Look in the Word by Word section to see analysis of the words just in verse 2 (P)

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You can see that by utilizing linking, the locator bar, and previous and next arrows, we can easily move through a passage a verse at a time without extra typing and scrolling through long lists of words!

If you like this arrangement, don’t forget to save it as a layout so you don’t have to reset the configuration the next time you want to use it.

If you found this trick helpful, you’ll thoroughly enjoy Logos Timesaving Tips, a downloadable Logos video resource with complete video instructions for over 100 helpful Logos features! Get it today.

Logos 5: Use Proximity Search for a Phrase Search

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently emailed me stating he was studying Ephesians 2:4 and came across the phrase “but God.” He inquired about finding similarities to that phrase even though it may not be that exact English phrase, “but God.”

There are several ways to go about this, but here is fairly simple method that yields some good results:

  • Open a Bible containing the reverse interlinear option such as The Lexham English Bible (LEB) (A)
  • Navigate to a verse containing the desired phrase such as Ephesians 2:4 with the phrase but God (B)

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  • Right click on the word but (C)
  • Select Lemma δέ (D)
  • Select Search this resource (E)

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  • Notice the Search panel opens with the results (F)
  • Type this text after the search query that is the Find box: BEFORE 2 words (G)
  • Notice the search query now reads < Lemma = lbs/el/δέ > BEFORE 2 words (H)

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  • Right click on the word God (I)
  • Select the second entry for the lemma which is Lemma θεÏŒς (J)
  • Select Search this resource (K)

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  • Notice a second search panel opens with this text in the Find box: < Lemma = lbs/el/θεÏŒς > (L)

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  • Copy / Paste the above query into the first search panel following the words BEFORE 2 words (M)
  • Notice the complete query now reads: < Lemma = lbs/el/δέ > BEFORE 2 words < Lemma = lbs/el/θεÏŒς > (N)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the results

You just located all the places in the LEB that the Greek conjunction de appears 1 or 2 words before the Greek noun theos!

Look carefully and you’ll see all of the results are not the English phrase but God. (O)

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You’ll find many more searching instructions in the 2-volume set of Logos 5 Training Manuals.

Logos 5: Combine Clause, Passage List, and LN Numbers for a Unique Search

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently emailed me this question:

Is there any way to use Logos 5 to locate every place where Jesus talks about sin? I know I can simply search Jesus AND sin and that will get me some (21) hits, but I am sure there are allusions and alternate words (for sin) that would not be included in that search.

I informed him that by combining several Logos tools, we can get very close to what he wants. One of the current solutions to the question involves several steps—please note: depending on your base package, you may not be able to complete this exercise.

But let’s have a go at answering this excellent question:

  • Click the Search icon
  • Select Clause as the search type (A)
  • Select The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition from the resource drop-down list (B)
  • Type this text in the Find box: person:Jesus (C)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the search, which locates all the places in the New Testament where Jesus is mentioned regardless of the words used to reference him (D)

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  • Choose the Search panel menu (E)
  • Select Save as Passage List (F)

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  • Notice that Logos creates a new Passage List document containing all of the verses from the search results (G)
  • Click the Search tab to return to the Search panel (H)

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  • Change the search type to Bible (I)
  • Select from the resource drop-down list a Bible, such as the ESV (J)
  • Select from the range drop-down list the Passage List that was just created (K)

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  • Type this in the Find box: < LN 88.105 – LN 88.318 >, which represents all of the Greek words in the New Testament that according to the Louw-Nida Lexicon have “negative” or unethical meanings (L)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the search, which locates the verses in which both the person Jesus and an “unethical” word appear in the same verse (M)

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As you look at the results, some of the verses will not apply directly to the user’s specific question, but many will be exactly what he was looking for!

Logos 5: Use Timeline for Biblical Events

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

A Logos user recently asked me this question:

Let’s say I’m studying a book in the Bible, and I want to know when it was written. Other than looking at a commentary or study Bible, is there a way to see its date of writing?

With Logos’ Timeline dataset, created just for questions like this, the answer is a resounding yes. (Note that this dataset doesn’t come with the Starter base package.)

Here’s a quick way to find a specific event:

  • Choose Tools | Timeline.
  • Type a word in the Filter box, such as Philippians (A).
  • Observe that only events containing that word appear on the Timeline. (The number in the Filter indicates the number of events currently being displayed.) (B)
  • Notice that your desired event may not currently be visible in the Timeline window (C).

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  • Choose the panel menu on the Timeline (D).
  • Select Find (in this panel) (E).

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  • In the Find box (which opened under the Filter box), type the same word that’s in the Filter box (such as Philippians) (F).
  • Look carefully at the Timeline, which jumped to an event containing your word (G).
  • Use the Previous and Next arrows to move through all the events on the filtered Timeline (H).

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  • Click an event on the Timeline to reveal more information, including hyperlinks back to resources (I).

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As you use the Timeline, please keep in mind these distinctions between Filter and Find:

  • Filter limits events on the Timeline.
  • Find locates events on the Timeline.

In the above example, you’ll see that Logos displays various possible dates, which are taken from resources in the library. Again, you can click an event on the Timeline to display hyperlinks back to those resources.

If you’d like to see other events happening at the same time as the writing of Philippians:

  • Remove the text in the Filter box (J).
  • And notice that all events return to the Timeline (K).

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