Archive by Author

The Advantage of Books Published by Logos

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collectionWhen you own a book in Logos, you’ll receive periodic updates—absolutely free. These revisions offer more than just corrected typos. You get more recent data, new milestones for better navigation, links to new resources, and increased functionality.

Updating original content

We’re now publishing original content, like the Lexham Bible Dictionary, the Faithlife Study Bible, and the Lexham Bible Guides. Because we produce these resources in-house, we’re able to update them by adding brand-new content. We’ve already added to the Faithlife Study Bible and the Lexham Bible Dictionary, and now we’re adding content to make Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians even better.

Updating Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians

Many of you have purchased Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians either as an individual volume or as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection. Written as a research guide, it has already helped many of you deepen your study of Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians by highlighting the critical issues in the text, pointing you to the key commentators, and explaining their positions.

Now we’ve enhanced the guide with more than 30% new content, including more analysis, more annotated links for each of the issues discussed, and several new Issues and Background Studies. We’ve also added discussions of nine additional commentaries, including new links to 18 different journal and dictionary articles. This added content will help you study Ephesians’ key interpretive issues while connecting you with the depth and breadth of your Logos library.

Incorporating your feedback

After releasing Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians—the first Lexham Bible Guide we produced—we received some helpful feedback from you on how we could make it even better. We listened to your ideas, and we learned from writing later volumes in the series, like the Genesis Collection. Based on this input and experience, we’ve incorporated a broader range of commentaries in annotated links from the Ephesians volume, including more discussion of resources available in base packages, like John Muddiman’s commentary on Ephesians from Black’s New Testament Commentary Series. We’ve also added specific Bible milestones throughout the Issues and Key Word Studies, making it easier for you to navigate.

The best part is that if you already own Lexham Bible Guide: Ephesians, you get all of this new content absolutely free. If you don’t own it yet, you can get it today as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection. Use coupon code LBGEPOC to receive 10% off through October 31!

Save on the Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection

As a small group leader, you have an important and challenging role. You know the time it takes to organize and research weekly lessons. You know your primary goals are to help your group engage and grow—with the Word and each other. Logos’ Studies in Faithful Living series equips small group leaders with all the tools you need to lead a rich and insightful study without sacrificing time for other priorities.

The second and third volumes of the Patriarchs Collection, Jacob: Discerning God’s Presence and Joseph: Understanding God’s Purpose, are now available. Each volume is an eight-week study of the lives of two of the Old Testament patriarchs. The complete church curriculum includes several features designed to help you as you lead your small group.

  1. It provides lesson plans. One of the most time-consuming aspects of leading a small group is deciding how to organize your lessons. The Studies in Faithful Living small group resources do that for you! Each series comes complete with weekly lesson plans, including learning objectives that summarize the theme and concepts of the chapter. Lesson plans also offer an outline that draws from the chapter text, prompts that suggest when to explain concepts or read passages aloud, and discussion and application questions to engage your group and make participation easy and comfortable.
  2. It provides slideshows and videos. Sometimes small groups can be dry. The Studies in Faithful Living curriculum provides media resources to help you ensure your small group time is engaging and fun. Each chapter includes an opening video to introduce the chapter’s themes and provide a dynamic start to the study. Each chapter also comes with a slideshow—available in three file formats and two dimensions, either 16×9 or 4x3—that follows the lesson plan. Slide graphics illustrate concepts within the chapter, display key texts or quotes, and present the discussion and application questions found in the lesson plan.
  3. It provides handouts. You’ll save time by using the printable handouts—available in Microsoft Word and PDF formats—of the week’s application questions. Since small group members can purchase just the book, they will have the opportunity to read each chapter before the meeting  and come prepared for discussion.
  4. It provides easy access to further research. Want to take your study deeper? At the end of every chapter, the authors provide a list of suggestions for further reading. The list is annotated with a brief description of what you can expect to gain from consulting each additional resource. All of these suggestions are available in Logos Bible Software, making your additional research only a click away.
  5. It gives you great content. None of these features would be worth much without great content. Each edition of Studies in Faithful Living includes eight chapters—in this case, tracing the lives of Jacob and Joseph and their journeys of faith. Each chapter walks you and your group through the biblical text. You’ll gain not only literary and historical context, but an understanding of how each story fits into the larger narrative of the Bible and what early interpreters thought of it. Application reflections and questions then allow you to see how these ancient stories of faith are relevant to your own story today.

Jacob: Discerning God’s Presence: Complete Church Curriculum and Joseph: Understanding God’s Purpose: Complete Church Curriculum make it easier for you to lead your small group through an engaging and thorough study. To celebrate shipping these final volumes in the Studies in Faithful Living: Patriarchs Collection, use coupon code SFLPAT through Friday, April 26, to get the discounted price of $229.95.

Save $100 on the Paul’s Letters Collection

Paul's LettersTo celebrate shipping Lexham Bible Guides: Colossians, the latest installment of the Paul’s Letters Collection, we’re giving you $100 off the collection’s regular price. Paul’s letters are full of rich theological material and practical advice—and perhaps that’s why these beloved parts of Scripture can be so difficult to comprehend. Even Peter recognized this, when he said, “There are some things in them that are hard to understand” (2 Pet. 3:15–16).

Grasp these difficult but important portions of the Bible

Each chapter of the Lexham Bible Guides includes six sections. The “Overview” and “Structure” sections introduce you to a specific passage by briefly summarizing and providing an outline. The “Place within the Book” section explains the immediate literary context and shows how the passage fits into Paul’s argument as a whole. The “Place within the Canon” section goes further by illustrating how Paul’s words fit into the broader context of biblical theology.

“Issues at a Glance” provides you with a quick guide to the major issues in Paul’s letters. It includes a summary of the varying points of view for each issue, along with an annotated list describing which views are held by the top commentaries or other resources. This list includes a summary of the arguments made by each individual author, providing you with the scholarly opinions you may not otherwise have access to. It also provides links to each of the resources discussed, so you can jump right to the relevant section of any Logos resources you own.

Learn relevant cultural context

In addition to the summary of major issues, the “Issues at a Glance” section also includes studies of key Greek words and background studies explaining relevant historical and cultural information. Finally, the “Application Overview” offers you a way to relate the passage to your life or the lives of those you are teaching.

Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection gives you the tools you need to understand the key issues in Paul’s letters. By summarizing research and presenting it in a clear and concise manner, the collection serves as a quick and easy-to-use guide to these important books. Lexham Bible Guides help you go deeper in the Word without spending countless hours on research.

When you purchase this collection, the volumes on Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, and Philemon will download immediately, and the remaining volumes will be released as they become available.

Order the Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection by April 4 using the coupon code LBGPLC, and you’ll receive $100 off the regular price.

Grow in Your Understanding of Genesis

Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 is the largest Lexham Bible Guide yet. From God’s call on Abraham to Joseph’s death in Egypt, the volume addresses more than 200 exegetical, theological, and historical issues and offers 55 word studies, giving you insight into the interpretation of these foundational chapters. For each issue, we examine the viewpoints of top scholars and biblical interpreters, allowing you to gain a quick understanding without having to read through several commentaries.

In Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50, we engage with more than 25 Genesis commentaries as well as relevant dictionaries and journal articles, providing you with a breadth of opinions on the more than 200 issues discussed in the volume. Our summaries of these commentaries’ positions save you countless hours of reading and research and give you short excerpts of the viewpoints articulated in biblical scholarship.

For example, after Joseph rose to power in Egypt, he had two sons with his Egyptian wife (see Gen 41:50–52). Scholars disagree on the relevance of Joseph’s names for his sons. Here is an excerpt from the volume:

Manasseh and Ephraim

During the seven years of plenty, Joseph has two sons (Gen 41:50). The giving of names in the Bible and in the ancient Near East carried great significance. Here, the names Joseph gives his sons speak directly to his past struggles.

Joseph names his first son Manasseh (menashsheh), which means something like “one who causes to forget.” Joseph explains this name by saying, “God has made me forget (nashshani) all my trouble and all my father’s house” (Gen 41:51). He names his second son Ephraim, explaining that “God has made me fruitful in the land of my affliction” (Gen 41:52). Ephraim (ephrayim) is derived from parah, meaning “to be fruitful.”

Both names highlight the hardship of Joseph’s life (“my trouble” and “my affliction”) and God’s role in the success he is now enjoying (“God has made me forget” and “God has made me fruitful”). However, scholars disagree on how to understand the additional note about forgetting “all my father’s house.” Some view it negatively and argue that Joseph should have been looking to reconcile with his father. Others view this as Joseph’s desire to forget his past sufferings

  • McKeown argues that Joseph’s statement about forgetting “all the house of my father” indicates that he does not plan to seek out his family. He asserts that Joseph has a new family in Egypt and does not show interest in either reconciliation or revenge.
  • Sarna believes the phrase “all my trouble and all my father’s house” should be translated as “my suffering in my parental home.” He argues that Joseph is not forgetting his father’s home but is merely not allowing the troubles of his youth to intrude on his future.
  • Waltke notes that Joseph is “strangely indifferent” toward his father. He points out, though, that the narrator does not condemn Joseph for this. Waltke also argues that Joseph’s giving his sons Hebrew names instead of Egyptian names indicates that he has not forgotten his father’s house.
  • Westermann understands the phrase “and all my father’s house” to mean “I am far from my father’s house.” He asserts that the names Joseph chooses reveal his understanding that God has been with him (Gen 39:2–6, 21–23).

Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 is available individually or as part of the Lexham Bible Guides: Genesis Collection. The collection is on sale for a limited time—only until February 14, when Lexham Bible Guide: Genesis 12–50 ships. Order now to get the lowest price on this collection, which will serve as your guide to Genesis for many years to come.

Wisdom and Vexation in Ecclesiastes

One of the issues involved in interpreting Ecclesiastes is the presence of what could be considered contradictions. The author declares that “much wisdom” comes with “much vexation” (Eccl. 1:18) and increased knowledge increases sorrow. But he also calls wisdom “good” and “an advantage” (Eccl. 7:11). The author argues that the dead are better off than the living (Eccl. 4:2­–3) and that the living are better off than the dead (Eccl. 9:4–6).

Sometimes these opposing statements appear in consecutive verses. In Ecclesiastes 8:12, the author says that “a sinner does evil a hundred times and prolongs his life,” and in verse 13 he states, “it will not be well with the wicked, neither will he prolong his days.”

These contradictions have caused “much vexation” for many who read Ecclesiastes and try to find ways to explain away their presence. But these contradictions play a vital role in the author’s argument. They illuminate the book’s theme: that life is full of contradictions. For example, when the author compares wisdom and folly, he notes that wisdom is to be preferred (Eccl. 2:12–14a), yet he also observes that the wise and the foolish share the same fate (Eccl. 2:14b–16). This leads the author to despair because everything in life “is vanity and a striving after wind” (Eccl 2:17).

In Chapter 2 of The End of the Matter, I closely examine Ecclesiastes contradictions. I explore how different interpreters have dealt with them, and show how they can be understood as part of the book’s overall argument about the contradictory nature of life. Later chapters illustrate how the author’s declaration to “fear God and keep His commandments” (Eccl. 12:13) provides a fitting conclusion to his argument.

The End of the Matter ships October 25. Act now to add this resource to your Logos library while it’s still available at the reduced Pre-Pub price!

5 Allusions to Psalm 22 at Christ’s Crucifixion

Logos Talk is bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Psalm 22 stands out among the Psalms in its depiction of the psalmist’s agony and suffering. It is no wonder that Jesus quoted the psalmist’s anguished cry of “my God, my God why have you forsaken me?” as he died on the cross. However, this is not the only reference to Psalm 22 in the gospel accounts of Christ’s death. In fact, there are five possible allusions. None of these allusions refer to Jesus’ physical suffering; instead, they focus on the rejection and contempt He experienced while paying the penalty for our sins.

  1. Psalm 22:18“they divide my garments among them, and for my clothing they cast lots.”  The psalmist says this to portray how close he is to death. His enemies are anticipating his death so much that they have already divided his clothes among themselves. All four gospels describe this event with John taking it further by describing it as a fulfillment of Scripture (Jn 19:23–24; Mt 27:35; Mk 15:24; Lk 23:34).
  2. Psalm 22:7—“they wag their heads.” The psalmist’s description of people’s reaction to him indicates their scorn and derision. Both Matthew and Mark allude to this: “And those who passed by derided him, wagging their heads” (Mt 27:39; Mk 15:29). Just like the psalmist, Jesus experienced rejection and ridicule by people. How difficult it must have been for the Son of God to endure such contempt for those he was sacrificing himself to save!
  3. Psalm 22:8—He trusts in the LORD; let him deliver him . . .  for He delights in him.” In Psalm 22 the psalmist wrestled with God’s silence. Despite his cries, God did not answer or deliver him (Ps 22:1–5). Because of God’s apparent absence, this taunt would have especially stung. Only Matthew includes a reference to this verse as he describes the crowd mocking Jesus for His trust in God: “He trusts in God; let God deliver him now, if he desires him” (Mt 27:43). Jesus also prayed to be delivered from His suffering, while still submitting Himself to God’s will (Mt 26:39). To be mocked for His humble submission to God’s must have been particularly painful for Christ.
  4. Psalm 22:1—“my God, my God why have you forsaken me?” The opening line of Psalm 22 beautifully expresses the anguish of the psalmist. He is suffering greatly, but his chief concern is that God—the source of his trust and deliverance—appears to have abandoned him. Matthew and Mark both attribute these words to Jesus (Mt 27:46; Mk 15:34). Jesus’ physical sufferings pale in comparison to the trauma of being forsaken by God as he takes the weight of our sin upon himself
  5. Psalm 22:31—he has done it.” Psalm 22 ends, not with suffering, but with praise as the psalmist worships God for delivering him (Ps 22:25–31). He enthusiastically proclaims God’s act of salvation and deliverance throughout the world and to all generations. The final line—which consists of one word in Hebrew—can be translated either “he has done it” or simply “it is done.” Jesus may be alluding to this when he says—with one word in Greek—“it is finished” (Jn 19:30). Christ’s dying words carry many implications: God’s plan of salvation has been completed; our sin is paid for; Christ’s work on earth is done. Perhaps it is also a shout of praise like the psalmist’s words in Psalm 22:31. It is finished. God’s ultimate deliverance has been carried out. Just as the psalmist proclaimed God’s deliverance of him, so should we proclaim Christ’s work of salvation on the cross to the ends of the earth and throughout all generations.

What crucifixion imagery impacts you the most in the gospel accounts? Leave us a comment and let us know, then take a look at our special Holy Week resources.