The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Segmentation

For the final installation in the series, "The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis," Dr. Steve Runge serves up some spicy discourse for you! Here, he highlights the flavors of Segmentation, another concept covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

If you still have not done so, be sure to serve up your own discourse by placing your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

Today’s video: Segmentation

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . Though Runge’s Discourse Grammar does not seek to replace traditional approaches to understanding and explicating the grammar and syntax of New Testament Greek, it provides a whole new range of conceptual and analytical tools that complement and supplement the more traditional approaches. . . . ”
—Dr. J. Ted Blakley, New Testament Studies, University of St. Andrews

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

Previous blog posts in this series:

You should follow us on Twitter here.

Finding all Articles about a Topic in one Book

Tips & Tricks blog SetToday’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Sometimes it’s possible to locate additional articles about a specific subject without having to execute a search.

For example, open the Logos Deluxe Map Set. Type Corinth in the Current Reference box and press Enter. A map about Corinth opens. Now press the Reference Locations arrow to the right of the box. A list of all the maps containing Corinth appears! Click one and you’re there.

Look for the Reference Locations arrow in other books especially topically indexed books like dictionaries. This can be a real time saver.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

You should follow us on Twitter here.

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Thematic Addition

Who knew you had to be an accountant in order to do Greek discourse analysis? Well, this week, Dr. Steve Runge takes you into the Accounting department here a Logos to illustrate Thematic Addition, another concept covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

After you grab your calculator, be sure to place your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

Today’s video: Thematic Addition

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . This work offers a fresh and illuminating approach to the Greek New Testament and will make a superb addition to the more traditional Greek grammars.”
—Jody Barnard, Bangor University, UK

“. . . . If you what to understand Discourse Analysis and how it works then—read this first!”
—Alan Macgregor, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for the last video of the series: Segmentation

Previous blog posts in this series:

What’s in My Library: Bible (Chronological)

Today’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars. In this series, Morris answers the question, “What’s in my library?”

So That's Why BibleBible (Chronological)

Definition: The contents of the Bible are not recorded for us like a story from start to finish in chronological order. A chronological Bible rearranges the events in Scripture placing them in the order they actually occurred in time.

Example: So That’s Why Bible

Application: Imagine doing a study on the life of Jesus from the four gospel accounts. You have to read a little in Matthew then jump to John then back to Luke and so on to read then events as they actually occurred. A chronological Bible places theses events on the page as they actually occurred so you can read about the life of Jesus from start to finish.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s mpSeminars website and his Tips & Tricks blog.

You should follow us on Twitter here.

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Forward Pointing Reference

We hope you have been enjoying "The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis" video series, so we "have an offer for you." "Here’s the deal." "How about this?" Yes, you guessed it, today Dr. Steve Runge’s introduces us to Forward Pointing References, another item covered in Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis.

Of course for a real deal, be sure to place your Pre-Pub order for the Discourse Grammar.

Today’s video: Forward Pointing Reference

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . By creating an accessible discourse grammar that brings together the fruit of careful research, clarity, helpful examples, and practical insights, Dr. Runge has put countless teachers and students in his debt.”
—Dr. Constantine R. Campbell, Moore College, Sydney, AU

“. . . One need not agree with every suggested interpretation to benefit by becoming more sensitive to significant elements of the Greek language that are rarely given the attention they deserve.”
—Dr. Roy E. Ciampa, Associate Professor of New Testament, Chair, Biblical Studies Division, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for next week’s video: Thematic Addition

Previous blog posts in this series:

You should follow us on Twitter here.

Discovering Which Church Father You’re Reading

Tips & Tricks blog SetToday’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Have you ever had one of the volumes of the Early Church Fathers open and you have no idea which church father you’re reading? If you’ve never experienced this before, just open a volume to some random location and you’ll discover you’re lost in a sea of text!

Stay calm! A life saver is available. It’s called the Locator Pane.

On the resource’s toolbar, click the last icon on the right. The Locator Pane appears at the top of the text telling which church father you’re reading. This trick of course works for other books as well.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

You should follow us on Twitter here.

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Changed Reference

As a reminder to place your Pre-Pub order for Dr. Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis, last Wednesday we started a short series of on-the-lighter-side, videos. This week, Steve helps illustrate another aspect of discourse analysis.

Today’s video: Changed Reference

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . Logos has done the Greek student a wonderful favor by making this work available. It should not be missed. It is like no other grammar that is available today.”
—Dr. Samuel Lamerson, Associate Professor of New Testament, Knox Seminary

“. . . Runge has produced an invigorating work that will repay the attention of all those who are interested . . .”
—Mark Dubis, Associate Professor of Christian Studies, Union University

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for next week’s video: Forward Pointing Reference

Previous blog post in this series:

What’s in My Library: Atlas (Bible)

Today’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars. In this series, Morris answers the question, “What’s in my library?”

Logos Deluxe Map SetAtlas (Bible)

Definition: A Bible atlas contains maps pertaining to the events that occurred in the Bible. A Bible atlas would include maps about the placement of the twelve tribes of Israel or the travels of Paul.

Example: Logos Deluxe Map Set

Application: As you read in John 4 about Jesus having to go through Samaria, an atlas will help explain the significance of the passage.

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s mpSeminars website and his Tips & Tricks blog.

You should follow us on Twitter here.

The Lighter Side of Discourse Analysis: Thematic Highlighting

We are serious about Bible study, and we are serious about getting the church back into the study of Greek and Hebrew. But we have a lighter side, too. So, as a reminder to place your Pre-Pub order for Dr. Steve Runge’s Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament: A Practical Introduction for Teaching and Exegesis, we have a few, short, on-the-lighter-side, videos coming for you to enjoy and to help illustrate the Discourse Grammar‘s content.

Today’s video: Thematic Highlighting

What’s being said about Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament:

“. . . . Runge’s work will become a required text in my Greek classes.”—Dr. Gerald Peterman, Professor of Bible and Chair of the Bible Department, Moody Bible Institute

“. . . . I commend his pioneering work for serious consideration by all New Testament students and scholars.”—Dr. William Varner, Professor of Greek Exegesis, The Masters College

The Discourse Grammar is at the end of production and is getting ready to ship soon, so make sure you place your order before the price goes up!

And stay tuned for next week’s video: Changed Reference

Topically Searching the Early Church Fathers

Tips & Tricks blog SetToday’s guest post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Did you know you can search the Early Church Fathers by topic? The developers of the electronic version of this set tagged each volume with topics! This means if you want to find out what the patriarchs of the early church thought about a subject you don’t have to do a word search and then wade through thousands of hits. Instead you can search by topic and jump right to a location where your subject is discussed in depth. Here’s how to take advantage of the developers hard work.

First, create a collection for the Early Church Fathers. Choose Tools | Library Management | Define Collections. Click New. Name the collection Early Church Fathers. Type fathers in the find box. When the list appears click on the first volume and press the Enter key. The selection moves down the list. Continue pressing the Enter key until all volumes have been added. Click OK.

Open the Topic Browser from the Go menu. Set the In box to the Early Church Fathers. Type a subject like kingdom in the Find box and click Search. When the list of Topics appears, select one like kingdom of God and all the places the church fathers discussed, that subject will display.

Click one of the articles to jump right to that spot!

For more tips like this, be sure to visit Morris Proctor’s Tips & Tricks blog or subscribe to the RSS feed.

You should follow us on Twitter here.