A Place for Hope: An Interview with Dr. Gregory Jantz (Part 2)

Dr Gregory JantzRecently, Logos had the opportunity to speak with author Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of A Place for Hope, a treatment center in Seattle for individuals struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, and other life challenges. This is the second part of a two-part interview—if you missed part one, catch up here.

Dr. Jantz, we currently have eight of your books in the Logos format, including Controlling Your Anger Before It Controls You. What can you tell us about anger? Is anger healthy or unhealthy to feel and express?

While planning this book, I realized I could exchange the word “anger” with the word “hurt.” Many times, we feel hurt and don’t know what to do with it, so it turns into anger. This book explains how to address our hurt before it becomes anger. Otherwise, the next stage is resentment, then bitterness. It creates an embittered spirit within us without our even realizing what’s occurring. [This embittered spirit] then leads to other issues, such as depression and addiction.

According to your book Healthy Habits, Happy Kids, how has culture affected interactions within families?

Culture has changed the act of sitting down to have a meal together, and that has nutritional consequences. Now we’re accustomed to this instant, fast-food culture, and even when families do sit down at the dinner table, it’s condensed because everyone is used to going so fast. Conversation is short because phones are out and texting goes on at the dinner table—that’s a problem.

You have two books that go together, Every Woman’s Guide to Managing Your Anger and Battles Men Face: Strategies to Win the War Within. What are the differences between men and women when it comes to dealing with internal struggles?

Women have a stronger tendency to internalize hurt and anger. Once internalized, that hurt and anger are transformed into something else. It may be depression; it may be an eating disorder. Men often deal with their anger more outwardly, perhaps through sports or some physical way of acting out.

In your book How to De-stress Your Life, what sources and solutions do you identify?

People become stressed, but they keep going and going. Then they become burned out, stop sleeping well, stop eating nutritiously, and yet still keep going. The final stage of stress hits, which is whole emotional exhaustion. This is the man in my office saying, “Dr. Jantz, it takes energy just to breathe.” The solution to this is to start administering self-care.

What does that self-care look like?

It’s dealing with the three deadly emotions: anger, fear, and guilt. A person who’s emotionally healthy knows not only how to manage those three, but also how to bring about a healthy response. They don’t injure themselves or others when they’re angry; they go to their faith when fear arises.

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All these titles are available in the Gregory Jantz Collection, currently on Pre-Pub for 25% off. Get yours before prices go up!

A Place for Hope: An Interview with Dr. Gregory Jantz

Dr Gregory JantzRecently, Logos had the opportunity to speak with author Dr. Gregory Jantz, founder of A Place for Hope, a treatment center in Seattle for individuals struggling with addiction, depression, trauma, and other life challenges.

You founded A Place of Hope 30 years ago, you’ve written 28 books, you’ve impacted thousands of lives—you’re obviously doing something right. What’s the “whole person care” approach you implement at A Place for Hope?

The whole care approach is a model I created that puts together a team specifically based on what a patient’s needs are. We have medical, psychiatric, fitness, and natural health care staff, as well as massage therapists, counselors, pastors, and chemical-dependency doctors. A whole team fit for each individual.

How does your organization differentiate itself from other treatment centers for emotional and health issues?

We’re all Christians, so we’re [a] faith-based [organization]. The whole person care is the spiritual foundation. Our theme verse is Jeremiah 29:11—it’s on the wall by the entrance. That verse is a reminder and promise to us all that we have a future, and it’s good.

What are some tips for people feeling angry or distressed, and wanting to get rid of those feelings in a healthy way?

Those feelings have to be dealt with and recognized as a problem. Many times, we develop a [concept] of unforgiveness in our lives and don’t deal with reality or handle anger well. [Thus], the step to recovery is self-forgiveness. The second step takes on the question of “how am I going to forgive those who have hurt me?” The goal is to move from being angry to [understanding] what to do with that anger.

What inspired A Place for Hope—did you wake up one day and decide “I’m going to change thousands of lives”?

The idea of whole person care came to me in college. It means living whole lives as God and Christ designed for us. The vision for A Place for Hope grew from the belief that you have to minister to the whole person in all aspects of life.

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Be sure to pre-order the Gregory Jantz Collection while it’s still on Pre-Pub for 25% off. Claim your copy before the price goes up!