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Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 2

SproulThis is the second half to last week’s Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1 by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Using Lectionary Resources in Logos Bible Software

Lectionary resources in Logos Bible Software are designed to make it easy to find the text for the day and to read it in the Bible translation of your choice.

The readings are arranged by calendar date and the book automatically opens at the next set of readings. For each Sunday or feast, the title, the season and the liturgical color is given. The text of the readings for the day is displayed in the translation you specify at the top of the panel, and links are provided that you can use to open your Bible or right-click to quickly open up Logos guides, tools and searches for deeper study and sermon preparation. (Click the images to see them full size.)

Lectionary Readings for the Day

For more general study, you can also find a complete listing of readings organized by liturgical event (i.e. more like a print lectionary that you can re-use year to year) in the “Index of Readings” found at the end of the lectionary.

The home page ribbon also gives you quick access to your lectionary. It displays the title and readings for the next Sunday and opens up your lectionary when you click.

To get your preferred lectionary to show up, prioritize it from Library.

In addition, the “Lectionaries” section of the Passage Guide allows you to quickly see where the passage you’re studying appears in your lectionaries. How and where a passage is used in a lectionary reveals important ways that your passage has been used in worship in connection with other passages or important feasts.

Passage Guide

To get this section to show up in your Passage Guide, click “Add” on the Passage Guide title bar and select “Lectionaries”.

Helps & Commentaries Geared Toward the Lectionary

Besides the lectionary resources mentioned in Part I, Logos also has several commentaries and sermon preparation helps that are specifically geared toward use with a lectionary:

Do you use a lectionary? Leave us a comment and let us know which one.

Great Tools for Discipleship on Pre-Pub

When I am asked about my discipleship as a young Christian, I always end up talking about Jerry Bridges.

I was in my early twenties when I made my decision to follow Jesus. David—a man in my church who took discipleship seriously—quickly took me under his wing. He gave me a dog-eared copy of Bridges’ The Pursuit of Holiness and asked me to meet him on the following morning to go over the first chapter.

We met nearly every Monday morning for the next three years. After wrapping up The Pursuit of Holiness, we went on to read The Practice of Godliness. Jerry Bridges became such a big part of those early years that when I think back, it is almost as if Bridges was with us—counseling, instructing, and convicting.

I recently read through the notes I had scrawled in the margins of those books, and I was struck by their action-oriented nature, things like: “Make this my prayer,” “Memorize  this verse,” and “Resolve this!” These weren’t just theoretical meditations on theological principles (although it was that too), they were the nuts and bolts of applied discipleship.

Ten years later I was the one discipling college students, and I was leading them through Bridges’ books.  I can honestly say, I have read every book in the 15 volume Jerry Bridges Collection with a student at one time or another.

One of my favorites in this collection—and one I have used more than a couple times—is Respectable Sins: Confronting the Sins We Tolerate. In Respectable Sins, Bridges reminds us to be mindful of our internal posture and outlook. It may be the overt sins that will trip us up, but it’s the deep-seated conditions of the heart which can poison and blind us over time. In a real and vulnerable way, Bridges reveals how he has identified sins like envy, selfishness, and pride in his own heart, and offers practical solutions to combating those conditions we tend to ignore or explain away in ourselves. In this book full of conviction and encouragement, we are reminded that, although we all fall short, there is no excuse to grow complacent in our attitude towards sin.

The strength of these books lie in their ability to be simple without being simplistic. I have found them to be powerful tools for deep, reflective discussions more times than I can count. If you do your own discipleship, have a Bible study or home group, or even want to get back to the practical aspects of your own personal faith, this collection is a must.

Six of the fifteen volumes in the Jerry Bridges Collection are study/discussion guides. By reflecting on, discussing, and responding to these guides you can compound on Bridges’ already practical content and really delve into its personal application—whether you are using them alone or in a group.

Three of the study guides are for books which have been available from Logos for some time but are not in this collection. If you already have a copy of The Pursuit of Holiness (only $6.00 on Logos.com!), The Practice of Godliness, or Trusting God: Even When Life Hurts for Logos 4 then you’ll want to add the Jerry Bridges Collection (15 vols.) to your resources. Otherwise you can get the collection while it is at its discounted Pre-Pub price, and pick up the other books at your leisure.

Have you led any one through one of Jerry Bridges books, or used it in your own spiritual formation? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

 

Lectionary-Based Study with Logos: Part 1

Sproul

What is a Lectionary?

A lectionary is a book or list of selections from Scripture (sometimes called “pericopes,” “lections,” or “lessons”) chosen for reading in public worship. The Christian practice of Scripture reading in public worship likely derived from the synagogue, and over time, in both Jewish and Christian traditions, the pericopes associated with the different Sabbaths or Sundays and other celebrations of the year were fixed and compiled in books and lists. For the traditions that use them, these lectionary pericopes often form the basis for preaching and provide themes for worship.

Who Uses a Lectionary?

Use of a lectionary is usually associated with the more liturgical traditions within Christianity, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism and Lutheranism. Nonetheless, in recent decades, some non-liturgical churches have also adopted optional or occasional use of a lectionary as a way of broadening the texts used for preaching or relating Sunday worship to the church year.

What are the Most Common Lectionaries in Use?

Until the 20th century, most Western Christian liturgical traditions used some derivative of the lectionary of the Roman Rite that took shape in the Middle Ages. This lectionary consists of an annual cycle of readings assigning an epistle and a Gospel pericope to each mass.

Lutherans and Anglicans reformed this lectionary in accord with Reformation understandings of Scripture and worship, while the reforms of the Council of Trent adjusted and standardized this lectionary for use in Catholic liturgy. These lectionaries are still used by some Lutheran and Anglican/Episcopalian congregations and in Catholic communities that celebrate the traditional Roman Rite.

Logos Bible Software base packages include two Lutheran Lectionaries that follow the traditional, one year, format: the Christian Worship One Year Lectionary from the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod and the Lutheran Service Book Historic (One Year) Lectionary from the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod.

In the 1960s, the lectionary for the Roman Rite in the Catholic Church was revised in response to the Second Vatican Council’s call for more extensive use of Scripture in the liturgy. The traditional lectionary was replaced with a three year cycle of three readings for Sundays and major feasts days and a two year cycle of two readings for daily mass. For most of the year, the Sunday cycle consists of an Old Testament reading, a non-Gospel New Testament reading and a Gospel reading. The lectionary also supplies a Responsorial Psalm that follows the first reading.

This arrangement found favor not just in the Catholic Church but among Protestants as well, and many churches began adopting versions of it. The ecumenical collaboration of the Consultation on Common Texts eventually resulted in the Revised Common Lectionary in 1992, which today is the most commonly used lectionary among English-speaking Protestants. As a consequence of this development, the same texts are proclaimed, reflected and preached upon on any given Sunday in congregations around the world and across many Christian traditions.

Logos Bible Software base packages include six of these modern three-year lectionaries:

Are the use of lectionaries important to you in your private or public worship? Leave us a comment and tell us why.

Next week we will look at using lectionary resources in Logos 4.

Today’s guest post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Logos Bible Software’s Catholic Product Manager.

Dig Deeper into the Word(s)

Today’s guest post is by Elise Bryant, from the Logos Bible Software Accounting department.

I feel like I’ve grown spiritually by listening to radio ministries. Three of my favorite teachers are Beth Moore, Kay Arthur and Nancy Leigh DeMoss. I’d hear them constantly refer to Greek and Hebrew—the languages that the Bible was first written in—to unlock the depth and beauty of Scripture. By doing word studies, they seemed to uncover the meaning of so many words that get lost in translation. Can I learn how to do the same thing in Logos? How can I follow along with them to know what they are saying is accurate?

What you just read came out of an email I sent out to my co-workers at Logos a while ago. My name is Elise Bryant and I work in the Accounting department at Logos. It’s funny, but even though I work here, I wasn’t familiar with our software. I just didn’t know how to use it to understand Scripture on a deeper level. So I asked my co-workers for some help.
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The Chesterton Birthday Sale!

Gilbert Keith ChestertonSunday, May 22, marks the birthday of British writer, G. K. Chesterton, and Logos is celebrating with a huge sale on the eleven-volume G. K. Chesterton Collection. Today through June 3, 2011, you can get the G. K. Chesterton Collection for over 60% off the retail price! For more information on how to take advantage of this deal, check out the end of this post.

Who is Chesterton?

Gilbert Keith Chesterton, writer of approximately 80 books, around 200 short stories, over 4000 essays, several plays, and hundreds of poems, is often considered one of the great minds of the early twentieth century.

Involving himself in many of the important discussions of his day, Chesterton showed great aptitude and intelligence across a wide spectrum of disciplines. He was well known as a Christian apologist, poet, playwright, journalist, lecturer, debater, literary critic, biographer, philosopher, novelist, and even as a contributor to the Encyclopedia Britannica.

Contemporaries of Chesterton knew him to be both a deep and profound thinker as well as incredibly witty and jovial personality. George Bernard Shaw, who was both a friend of Chesterton’s and a frequent philosophical sparring partner, called Chesterton “a man of colossal genius.”
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New Christian eBook Store to Launch Up to 25,000 Books in 2011

What Is Vyrso?

Within the publishing world, books can generally be divided into one of two categories: reference books and trade books. Reference books include things like commentaries, dictionaries, encyclopedias, and other academic works. You can put almost everything else—novels, popular non-fiction, and children’s books—into the trade book category.

For nearly twenty years—long before the ebook boom—Logos has been bringing you the best in electronic reference books. With Vyrso, Logos is bringing that experience and expertise to trade books.

Vyrso helps you find, buy, and read your favorite Christian books. The Vyrso store will offer your favorite bestselling and classic Christian books, and you can use the Vyrso reader on iPad, iPhone, and (soon!) Android devices.

(Vyrso titles also work in Logos Bible Software 4, and you’ll be able to read all your Logos 4 titles in the Vyrso reader, too!)

To get a picture of what’s to come, check out these 25 bestsellers and start reading them with the Vyrso app today. For a limited time, all ebooks are at least 50% percent off!

Look for up to 25,000 books available by the end of 2011.
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Read Beth Moore’s The Beloved Disciple for Free!

This week (May 15–May 21, 2011) Logos Bible Software is featuring Beth Moore’s The Beloved Disciple: Following John to the Heart of Jesus on FreeBookPreview.com. This means that through the end of this week, you can read The Beloved Disciple in its entirety!

Are you looking to grow your faith as you increase your understanding of God’s love? Let popular author Beth Moore encourage and edify you with lessons culled from the life of the apostle John. Follow John all the way from the thick of Jesus’ ministry to witnessing His death and resurrection. Experience John’s exile to Patmos and the wisdom of Revelation. Moore has mined the depths of John’s life and—in The Beloved Disciple—brings forth gem after gem of comfort and conviction.

How do I get the free preview?

Free book previews are featured in our free iPhone app.

Simply:

  • Download the free Logos Bible Software iPhone app.
  • Sign in or create a free Logos.com account.
  • Enjoy your Free Book Preview!

If you have another mobile device with web access, simply head to FreeBookPreview.com and follow the directions to check out Beth Moore’s The Beloved Disciple.

If you have a friend or relative with an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch let them know how they can read The Beloved Disciple this week for free! And be sure to check out FreeBookPreview.com to see what previews are coming up.

Leave us a comment and let us know what you books would like to see previewed.

Dr. Steven Runge Takes Discourse Grammar on the Road

Logos’ own Steven Runge has been invited to share his discourse grammar course at  Wycliffe Hall at the University of Oxford June 28-July 2, 2011.

Discourse grammar is not just for advanced New Testament scholars, but has proven really useful for beginning Greek students and pastors as well! Runge takes complex linguistic ideas and makes them accessible. His cross-linguistic approach focuses on exegesis instead of translation, helping you gain a much deeper understanding of the Greek text. Attention is given to describing the task accomplished by each discourse device. This function-based approach helps to conceptualize what is happening in Greek by understanding how the comparable task is accomplished in another language. If you’ve had a year of Greek and are comfortable working in an interlinear text, then you’ll benefit from attending.
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Enjoy a Free Preview of R. C. Sproul’s John

This week (May 5–May 7, 2011) Logos will be partnering with Ligonier Ministries to offer a free preview of R. C. Sproul’s John. In John, the second volume in the St. Andrew’s Expositional Commentary series, Sproul deals with the major themes of John’s Gospel with profound insight. Not only does he give perspective into the cultural context and background of John’s Gospel, he also communicates John’s goals for his message, as well as clearly explaining some of its more difficult passages. In addition to being the fruit of a lifetime of scriptural study, John comes from Sproul’s preaching ministry at St. Andrew’s in Sanford, Florida. The St. Andrew’s Expositional Commentary series adapts Sproul’s sermons for a wider audience. Each of John’s fifty-seven chapters began as a St. Andrews sermon, and as you follow Sproul through John’s Gospel you will be enriched and inspired to a greater depth of devotion to Christ. Continue Reading…

The Thomas Cranmer Collection on Community Pricing

Canmer
Today’s guest blogger is Richard Wardman, a Logos-using Assistant Pastor from England currently studying for his MTh.

About Community Pricing

Community Pricing is a huge gift from Logos to its users, making some classic works available for bargain prices. Some people (like me, at first) might take one look at the chart, containing all kinds of dots, arrows and numbers, and run a mile. But once you’ve taken the time to investigate what it all means, the idea becomes crystal clear: Customers decide what books Logos produce, and what price they’ll pay (If you’re still confused, there is a great explanation of the program on the website)!

One recent example would be the three-volume Edwin Hatch Collection. When enough people had placed bids to cover production costs the whole thing went for $8 (that’s under £5 for my fellow Pound Sterling friends). Right now it would cost you $39.95 on Pre-Pub (which is still a 56% savings on these books). That’s a huge saving for anyone who got in early under Community Pricing! Continue Reading…