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Bible Study Magazine Gets Interactive

Today’s guest post is from Brittany Rogers, copy editor for the Publications department at Logos Bible Software.

Are you always on the hunt for fresh ways to study the Bible? Do you wish that you could visualize the biblical text instead of just having it explained to you? If you’re a visual learner, you’ll be excited to hear about the interactive media page at BibleStudyMagazine.com. You will find some of the Bible’s most complex data presented in appealing and easy-to-understand infographics. And it’s all right at your fingertips.

Each infographic has been created from content originally published in Bible Study Magazine. Here are just a few examples:

  • Does the Bible really disagree with a historian and an Assyrian king? God’s Word through Multiple Voices” examines one of the most controversial events in the Bible: Sennacherib’s invasion of Judah during Hezekiah’s reign. Not familiar with the foreign landscape of the Old Testament? Don’t worry. Using the interactive map, you can easily examine 2 Kings and the opposing accounts of Sennacherib’s campaigns across Judah.
  • Just how tall was Goliath? Was he taller than NBA superstar Shaquille O’Neal? And who really killed the giant? All of these questions and more are addressed in “Clash of the Manuscripts: Goliath and the Hebrew Text of the Old Testament.” What’s more, the original Hebrew text is color-coded, making passage comparison quick and easy.
  • The New Testament didn’t drop out of heaven: Early Christians were persecuted by the Romans for possessing New Testament manuscripts in ancient times, yet they continued to make copies. So which fifth-century manuscript was most commonly reproduced? This inforgraphic uses a hot air balloon to demonstrate the popularity of the New Testament, comparing it to other works of the time by Josephus and Homer. The stats might surprise you.

These interactive tools provide a glimpse at the rich content in each issue of Bible Study Magazine. We’re passionate about getting you into the Word, and we’re always coming up with new ways to improve your study. So check out these interactive articles, and if you haven’t already, subscribe to Bible Study Magazine today!

Get a Free Resource for Washington’s Birthday

Today Logos joins the rest of the United States in celebrating Washington’s Birthday (don’t worry, the sales team will still be here to take your orders!). You can celebrate with us by downloading a free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States. But hurry, it will only be available until midnight on Tuesday, February 21!

The Background of Washington’s Birthday

Americans have celebrated George Washington’s birthday long before it was declared a national holiday. It wasn’t until 1879 that February 22, became a national legal holiday (one of only 11 permanent holidays established by Congress). In 1968, Congress passed the Monday Holidays act which moved the celebration of Washington’s birthday from February 22 to the third Monday in February.

While there have been many attempts to change the name of the holiday to Presidents’ Day in honor of both Washington and Abraham Lincoln (whose birthday falls on February 12), this proposal has always been rejected by Congress. Contrary to popular belief, the holiday is still Washington’s Birthday.

Since 1862, George Washington’s Farewell Address has traditionally been read in the United States Senate. This document includes the following profound statement:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician, equally with the pious man, ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked: Where is the security for property, for reputation, for life, if the sense of religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investigation in courts of justice? And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.”

Check Out These Deals!

We have also discounted some other political and patriotic titles. Check deals on these titles:

Don’t miss an opportunity to add these resources to your library. They go back to their regular prices at midnight on Tuesday, February 21.

If you want to browse similar titles, you can do a faceted search under the topic Politics & Government. Faceted browsing is a great way to find materials you may have missed.

So download your free copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States today, check out some of the other deals we have available, and have a happy Washington’s Birthday!

Weekly Roundup: February 18

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of February 18, 2012.

Enter to Win Two Free Passes to Camp Logos and a Tour of the Logos Campus!

Would you like to visit Bellingham, WA, get two passes to our National Camp Logos, and tour the Logos facility? You can win an all-expense-paid trip to do just that! Take the virtual tour and enter to win.

Logos Talk

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Vyrso now has Daily Deals! Follow on Twitter @Vyrso and look for #DailyDeal in the tweet.

Pinterest

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Vyrso

Pre-Pubs

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to pick these up at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!

Community Pricing

Be sure to check out the latest collection from Community Pricing: the Classic Anabaptist and Mennonite History Collection (19 vols.)

  • Containing the writings of early Anabaptists like Menno Simons and Balthasar Hübmaier, as well as works from twentieth-century Mennonite scholars like Daniel Kauffman and J. S. Hartzler, the Classic Anabaptist and Mennonite History Collection (19 vols.) is a must-have for those interested in Reformation history.

Don’t miss out on these collections nearing the 100% mark!

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newest postings on our Careers page:

Marketing Department

Graphic Design and Video

Sales

Software Development

Publications

Ministry Development

Customer Service

Finance

Operations

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Ecclesiastes Revisited: Getting to the End of the Matter

Today’s guest post is from Miles Custis, contributing editor for Bible reference projects at Logos Bible Software and author of The End of the Matter.

Scholars often disregard the ending of Ecclesiastes. They view it—especially 12:13–14—as a later addition made by some scribe who wanted to tone down the book’s negative message.

In the typical view, the message of the book is that life is difficult and hopeless (expressed in passages like Eccl 4:2–3). The author doubts God’s justice and portrays Him as distant and unconcerned. Understood this way, the concluding message to “fear God and keep His commands” is incompatible with the rest of the book.

However, a careful reading of Ecclesiastes reveals that the author promotes a hopeful, albeit realistic, view of life throughout. He portrays God as sovereign and the giver of joy (see Eccl 2:26; 3:13; 5:19–20), emphasizing that human knowledge is limited when compared with God’s sovereign power (see Eccl 3:14 and 8:16–17). So the epilogue “fear God and keep His commands,” does not contradict the rest of the book; instead, it complements the book’s message.

In The End of the Matter I take a close look at how the epilogue of Ecclesiastes relates to the rest of the book. I examine how the author uses the term hebel—typically translated as “vanity” or “meaningless”—and what he describes as hebel. I also explore the author’s values, namely wisdom, joy, and the fear of God, finding ways to understand apparent contradictions in the book (as seen in 8:12–13). Finally, I examine how the author uses the epilogue (12:9–14) and prologue (1:1) as a literary device that presents a narrative frame around “the words of Qohelet” (the “Preacher” or “Teacher”). The author shows that, while life is characterized by hebel, one should respond by fearing God and keeping His commands.

The End of the Matter is currently under development. But if you order quickly, you can pick it up on Pre-Pub while it is still only $19.95!

The LEB Old Testament Is Now Available

We introduced the Lexham English Bible (LEB) with a blog post in March, 2010. Initially,  only the New Testament was available. We are happy to announce that the entire Old Testament is now complete!

The LEB is a new translation that complements your primary translation. It doesn’t matter whether you use the ESV, NIV, KJV, or any other English translation, the LEB will help you to identify things like difficult texts, idiomatic phrases, and grammatical issues. When you couple the LEB with your principal translation, you will gain a better understanding of the Bible in English. Visit the Lexham English Bible page for information regarding this new translation.

Download It Now!

If you already have the Lexham English Bible as part of your Logos 4 resources, you will be receiving an update with the LEB Old Testament. If you don’t own a Logos 4 base package, you can download the LEB individually for free for Logos 4 or for older versions of Logos. From the product page, click “Add to Cart” (make sure you’re logged in) and proceed through checkout. Our checkout process currently requires credit card information, but we promise you won’t be charged.

Weekly Roundup: February 11

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of February 11, 2012.

Tim Challies Is on the Cover of Bible Study Magazine!

“I am eager for Christians to look at personal devotions as being less about Bible study and more about relationship,” says Christian blogger Tim Challies. “I believe we can find freedom in seeing personal devotions as a conversation: hearing from the Lord in the Bible and then speaking to Him in prayer. . . . This is not about studying the way you would study a Shakespearian play or a textbook. This is relating to God. As I read the Bible, I am trying to ask questions based on my personal relationship with Him. If there is a story in there, I am asking, ‘Why would God reveal Himself in this story? Why does He want me to know this story? What am I being called to do?’ ” —Karen Jones

Subscribe now and receive the Tim Challies at nearly 33% off the cover price!

Logos Talk

Interesting Discussions

Facebook

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Logos

Vyrso

Pre-Pubs

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to pick these up at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!

Community Pricing

Be sure to check out the latest collection from Community Pricing: the Classic Anabaptist and Mennonite History Collection (19 vols.)

  • Containing the writings of early Anabaptists like Menno Simons and Balthasar Hübmaier, as well as works from twentieth-century Mennonite scholars like Daniel Kauffman and J. S. Hartzler, the Classic Anabaptist and Mennonite History Collection (19 vols.) is a must-have for those interested in Reformation history.

Don’t miss out on these collections nearing the 100% mark!

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newest postings on our Careers page:

Marketing Department

Graphic Design and Video

Sales

Software Development

Publications

Ministry Development

Customer Service

Finance

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

7 Pre-Pubs for Less Than $20!

Want to add some resources to your library on the cheap? You can find lots of books on Pre-Pub for less than $20. Here is a sampling of what’s available:

  1. In Search of the Silver Lining: Where Is God in the Midst of Life’s Storms? This book, now on Pre-Pub for only $8.95, tackles the age-old question of suffering with delightfully encouraging and fresh insights. This title ships on February 13, 2012, so make sure to get your order in soon!
  2. The Voice of God: Experience a Life Changing Relationship with the Lord: Looking for a resource that emphasizes biblical authority and gives a good outline of basic Christian doctrines? Pick up The Voice of God now for $11.95.
  3. Wake Up Church: How to be Ready for the Return of Christ: Is the church ready for the return of Christ? Are you? Greg Wilburn shares shares several scriptural exhortations to be ready for the glorious return of Christ. Wake Up Church is available on Pre-Pub for the low price of $9.95.
  4. Christian Growth from A to Z: A Practical Discipleship Manual for Both New and Growing Christians: If you are a new Christian or looking for strong material to help you mentor others, you can’t go wrong with Christian Growth from A to Z. You can add this resource to your library for $9.95.
  5. Esther: Reflections from an Unexpected Life: Jennifer Westbrook Spivey unlocks the relevance of Esther for today. For less than $10, you can learn from Esther’s story how to trust God through life’s unexpected turns.
  6. Chariots of God: God’s Law in Relation to the Cross and the Christian: Take a powerful trip through the nature of the Ten Commandments, the purpose of the law, and Christ’s victorious sacrifice with Chariots of God. This is a thorough examination of the relation of the law to both the Gospel as well as to believers, and is an excellent addition to your library for only $7.99.
  7. Who Stole My Joy?: If you need to regain the joy that the circumstances of life may have taken from you, check out Sandra Steen’s practical and inspiring Who Stole My Joy? It can be yours for only $10.95.

Check out all of the Pre-Pubs available for less than $20. Pre-Pubs are a fantastic way grow your library for less!

Patristic Commentaries on Pre-Pub

Today’s post is by Louis St. Hilaire, Content Manager of our Electronic Text Development department.

If you’re interested in the preaching and exegesis of the fathers of the church, there are three important collections available for pre-order that you should know about.

The Works of St. Cyril of Alexandria makes an excellent complement to the Early Church Fathers collection. Cyril was central to the Christological controversies of the fourth and fifth centuries and was well regarded in later centuries, but is oddly neglected in the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers. This collection closes the historical gap with letters and writings related to Cyril’s controversy with Nestorius, but, just as importantly, it includes Cyril’s massive commentaries on Luke and John.

Very few patristic commentaries on Luke have survived, so Cyril’s commentary on Luke is an important witness to the interpretation of this Gospel in the first millennium. Aside from a few sermons of Augustine, it will be the first from this era to be available for Logos.

John was much more commonly preached and commented on, so the Early Church Fathers already has commentary or homilies on John from Origen, Augustine and John Chrysostom. Adding Cyril’s commentary to this lets you see the development of the Alexandrian tradition of interpretation from Origen to Cyril, or compare, side by side, this tradition in Cyril with those of Antioch and the Latin West represented by Chrysostom and Augustine respectively.

Theodore of Mopsuestia’s Commentary on the Minor Pauline Epistles brings to Logos for the first time the writings of the man who was, in many ways, the mind opposite Cyril’s in the Christological controversies and theological and exegetical rivalry between Alexandria and Antioch. While it’s now acknowledged that the contrast between Alexandrian allegory and Antiochene literalism is not quite as sharp as was once thought, Theodore is perhaps the most typical and famous representative of the Antiochene tradition, and his comments onGalatians 4:21-31 contain an important polemic against the allegorists.

The Medieval Preaching and Spirituality Collection also includes writings of several later writers from the patristic era, including John Damascene, Boethius, and Gregory the Great. Important among these is Gregory the Great’s Morals on the Book of Job. The interpretation of the Old Testament was a pressing problem for the early church, as it engaged in controversies with Gnosticism, Judaism, and pagan critics. Gregory stands near the end of this era, as an heir to the exegetical methods pioneered and developed by men like Irenaeus, Origen, and Augustine, and his commentary on Job formed an important bridge from his own era to later centuries. It was incredibly influential in the Middle Ages, being cited hundreds of times in the Summa Theologica of Thomas Aquinas.

If you’re interested in learning more about the biblical interpretation of the church fathers, take a look at Manlio Simonetti’s Biblical Interpretation in the Early Church or the Historical Interpreter’s Collection.

Weekly Roundup: February 4

The Weekly Roundup is a regular feature alerting you to significant things happening at Logos this week. Take a few moments to check out these newsworthy items for the week of February 4, 2012.

Time Is Running Out!

Global Christianity Collection (7 vols.)

The Global Christianity Collection ships February 6, 2012, but there are still a couple days left to add this incredible collection to your library at this fantastic Pre-Pub price.

Head over and check out the 6-volume Global Christianity Collection now.

Logos Talk

Interesting Discussions

Facebook

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Pre-Pubs

New Pre-Pubs

Last Chance Pre-Pubs

These are Pre-Pubs shipping next week. Don’t miss your last chance to pick these up at their amazing Pre-Pub prices!

Community Pricing

The latest collections from Community Pricing:

Don’t miss out on these collections nearing the 100% mark!

Job Postings

Logos is hiring! Here are just a few of the newest postings on our Careers page:

Marketing Department

Graphic Design and Video

Sales

Software Development

Publications

Ministry Development

Customer Service

Finance

Was there anything else from Logos you found interesting this week? Leave us a comment and let us know!

Logos Convinces Philadelphia to Visit

Philly Boys Cheesesteaks have been making quite a name for themselves in Seattle, WA. John and Frank, the owners (and Philly natives) have been selling their amazing sandwiches out of their mobile cheesesteak factory since March, 2011. It wasn’t long before word-of-mouth about Philly Boys made its way north to Bellingham, WA.

It seemed that the word “cheesesteak” was being dropped into casual conversations regularly around Logos like some glorious, cheese-covered pipe dream. But how could we transport 250 employees to Seattle for a cheesesteak? Then the marketing team hit on a crazy idea: why not bring Philly Boys to us?

Believe it or not, it isn’t easy to convince a business to take the day off from serving their regular and enthusiastic customers, load up their restaurant on wheels, and drive for two hours to risk doing less business than normal. So how do you convince them this is a good idea? You pull out all the stops, that’s how.

The Logos marketing team started a social media marketing campaign and did enough groundwork to convince Philly Boys to come. Even local media outlets started getting excited about the idea.

When the big day finally arrived, the line for cheesesteaks stretched around the block. It was an amazing success! We got to fill up on unbelievable sandwiches, the Philly Boys enjoyed their visit, and we got to build community among the downtown businesses in Bellingham.

You might be thinking, “That’s great, why are you telling me this?”

Our marketing team (among other departments) is hiring and we want to give you the opportunity to come work for a company who uses their skills to do all sorts of fun stuff. We work hard, we play hard, and we engage our community. If you think this sounds like the kind of thing you would excel at, and the kind of environment you’d like to work in, check out our career page.

Maybe the next outrageous idea we make a reality will be yours . . .

UPDATE:

We like to eat at least once a day, and we’re always open to new ideas. Which food do we need to bring in next? Italian Beef from Chicago? Crêpe cart from Paris? Bánh mì stand from Vietnam? Let us know in the comments!