Archive by Author

The Real Message of David and Goliath

Rethinking GoliathYou’ve known this story since you were a kid sitting in front of a flannel board in Sunday school. David, the Israelite shepherd boy armed with a sling and a few stones, defeats Goliath, the giant Philistine warrior.

This seemingly mismatched battle between a plucky little guy and an invincible big guy has captured imaginations to the point that even people who have never set foot in church know that a “David and Goliath” situation involves an underdog taking on a titan.

Rethinking David and Goliath

But what lesson should we take away from the story of David and Goliath? Is it about courage? Faith? Humility? All of the above? As is often the case with narrative portions of the Bible—and particularly the Old Testament—the message for readers is not explicitly stated.

In Rethinking David and Goliath, Lisa A. Eary brings the method of evangelical narrative criticism to bear on this familiar tale. Following OT scholar J. Daniel Hays, Eary describes evangelical narrative criticism as “a modified form of literary criticism that adopts the standard techniques of literary analysis to enhance close reading of the text but rejects the postmodern presuppositions.” It looks at a text’s literary features, history, and theological elements to help readers see how their own lives might be transformed. Continue Reading…

Back-to-School Savings on the Paul’s Letters Collection

lexham-bible-guides-pauls-letters-collection (1)Students everywhere are buying textbooks and stuffing their backpacks to start a new year of learning. If you’re feeling a bit nostalgic, Logos has you covered. The Lexham Bible Guides: Paul’s Letters Collection is now available at back-to-school pricing—it normally costs $534.95, but you can use coupon code BTS2013 to get it for only $429.95 through Friday!

Understanding Paul’s letters is an important part of any Christian’s study. His epistles to the early churches and to his colaborers for Christ make up the majority of the New Testament. This collection of Lexham Bible Guides—one volume for each of Paul’s letters—opens these texts to you in a new and deeper way, guiding you to a fuller understanding of the exegetical and theological issues of Paul’s writings.

Christ Hymn

Continue Reading…

Now Available: Evangelical Exegetical Commentary on Song of Songs

eecThe Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (EEC) is a unique publishing project. Designed for digital, it features the latest in biblical scholarship, looks at application and devotional implications, and is written from a distinctly evangelical perspective. Since it was announced in 2010, five volumes have been released: 1, 2 & 3 John, Exodus, Ezra & Nehemiah, James, and Philemon.

We’re excited to announce the latest release in the series: Song of Songs, by A. Boyd Luter. Luter currently serves as adjunct online professor of New Testament at Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary. He’s been a pastor, and has also taught at Crichton College, LeTourneau University, Talbot School of Theology, Cedarville University, Criswell College, Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, Ashland Theological Seminary, and Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is a coauthor of Ruth and Esther: God behind the Seen, and wrote the notes on Luke, Galatians, and Revelation for the HCSB Study Bible.

In his EEC volume, Luter argues that the Song of Songs can be divided into seven sections, taking a young couple from their initial longings and expressions of affection for each other to their wedding day, and on to the various struggles that threaten to derail their love. For each section, Luter comments on the text and background and provides helpful suggestions on how it might be preached and applied today.

Song of Songs makes up half of the EEC volume on Ecclesiastes & Song of Songs. The Ecclesiastes portion, by Bob McCabe, is forthcoming. If you’ve purchased the EEC, you’ll receive Song of Songs automatically, with no additional purchase required.

If you haven’t purchased the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary series, get it today!

Quotations from Throughout Church History

1500-quotations-for-preachers-with-slidesThis spring, we released 1,500 Quotations for Preachers, a five-volume collection of quotations from throughout church history. Each quotation features a professionally designed slide, is tagged with Scripture references and themes, and contains a full bibliographic citation of its original source.

The response to this collection has been very positive. But much as it pains me to admit it, I know there are people who are interested in just a few of these volumes—not the whole set. If you’re one of those people, I have good news for you: each volume is now available individually.

Continue Reading…

Introducing the Spurgeon Commentary: New Testament Letters Collection

spurgeon-commentary-collection-new-testament-lettersThree months ago, Logos introduced the Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians, a unique project in which we organized and edited the writings of Charles Spurgeon, the great British Baptist preacher, into commentary format. That resource met with such a positive response that it went into development almost immediately. Seeing that there is demand for such a resource, we now present nine more volumes in the series: the Spurgeon Commentary Collection: New Testament Letters. Like the Galatians volume, each new book in this series will:

  • Show you what Spurgeon had to say about a verse and particular words within it
  • Highlight Spurgeon’s illustrations of truths found within the text, categorizing them according to theme so you can find them more easily using your Logos library
  • Draw out Spurgeon’s application-oriented content, offering ideas for how to apply these concepts in your own life and share them with your congregation
  • Provide the sources used, so you can dig deeper into the original context

Phil Johnson, an authority on Spurgeon and the curator of The Spurgeon Archive, graciously contributed a foreword for the series. He concluded it in this way: Continue Reading…

Sampling the Wisdom of the Ages

G. K. Chesterton

Whenever you address an audience, your goal is always to find just the right words to convey your message. Finding those words can be a challenge, especially when you’re searching for a quotation to make a concept more memorable or when you want to share wisdom from church history.

We compiled 1,500 Quotations for Preachers to help you at just such times. This five-volume set contains hand-selected remarks from church leaders (and a few others) throughout the centuries. Each volume features quotations from a particular era of church history, and each quote is accompanied by a slide, like the above quote from G. K. Chesterton.

This is not your typical quotation collection

  • Search tools save you time. Find quotations by searching for author, theme, or Scripture reference. This enables you to find exactly what you need—fast. For example, the above quotation is tagged with the theme sin, and the Scripture references Genesis 8:21; Psalm 51:5; Romans 3:11–12, 23; and Ephesians 2:2–3.
  • Sharing becomes easy. All quotations come with a professionally designed slide featuring an excerpt, making it easier to share with others.
  • Language is updated. For some quotations, archaic language (like “thee” and “thou”) has been updated, making the quotations ready to use in a modern context.
  • Continue Reading…

Spurgeon on Being Crucified with Christ

SpurgeonA friend asked me recently about what I was doing at work, and I told him a bit about compiling the Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians. He was incredulous. He asked, “You get to read Spurgeon all day?”

I don’t actually get to read Spurgeon all day, but I have been spending a lot of time with the Prince of Preachers lately. It has been a pleasure to comb through his writings on Galatians, find the best nuggets of wisdom, and put them in a format that’s accessible to today’s readers.

You can read more about this resource in my earlier post, and you can pre-order it today while it’s still at a discounted price. In the meantime, here are some of Spurgeon’s thoughts on one of the most popular verses in the book—Galatians 2:20, “I am crucified with Christ, and I no longer live, but Christ lives in me.”

Crucified with Christ:

“When a man finds and knows himself to be linked with Christ, his life is altogether a new life. Crucified, then dead. Crucified, then the old life is put away. Whatever life a crucified man has must be new life. Whatever you have of life was not given you till you came into union with Christ. It is a new thing—as new as though you had been actually dead and rotted in the tomb and then had started up at the sound of the trumpet to live again.”

Continue Reading…

Now on Pre-Pub: Spurgeon on Galatians

Spurgeon Commentary GalatiansThe words of Charles Spurgeon, the great nineteenth-century Baptist preacher, fill more than 100 volumes. He preached and wrote a phenomenal amount about the Bible, but only wrote commentaries on Psalms and Matthew. His content spans across all other biblical books, but it isn’t easy to find or use.

That’s why we’ve decided to create the Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians. When we created this resource, we had a few goals in mind:

  • Organize Spurgeon’s work into commentary format, curated and made accessible by verse and chapter
  • Tag content—such as illustrations—to make it easier to find in the Logos platform
  • Update Spurgeon’s language for readability
  • Highlight the content that’s most applicable to a modern audience

If you already own Spurgeon content in your Logos library, you may be wondering why you couldn’t just perform a search in Logos to find what you’re looking for. Of course, a search could turn up some of the same content, but this hand-edited resource provides content that a search would not. For example, the Spurgeon Commentary: Galatians picks up on allusions in Spurgeon’s writing, whereas a search for a particular verse range would find only explicit citations. Continue Reading…

The Biblical Polemic against Empires

The Biblical Polemic Against EmpiresHow many times have we heard that the Bible is a strange and ancient book with little relevance for the modern world? In The Biblical Polemic against Empires, Lanier Burns, research professor of theological studies at Dallas Seminary, provides ways to understand the Bible and its importance in our lives. He argues that we best understand the Bible when we comprehend the ways that biblical authors presented truths in the contexts of Egypt, Babylon, Hellenism, and Rome.

Burns connects our modern concerns with the ancient world by exploring biblical arguments in three areas—deity, kingship, and city:

  1. Attitudes toward deity: Ancient nations and empires, including Israel, were theocracies. Governments represented divine interests and powers. Not only was secularity in a modern sense unknown, but so was the notion of citizens selecting their leaders. Idolatry was a particularly heinous sin for the Israelites; other gods were mere projections of the desires of a sponsoring empire. The realms of gods and people were in a constant state of conflict and chaos. People served their gods in a frenzied way, trying to magically manipulate them in hopes of gaining prosperity.
  2. The tyranny of kingship: The Bible presents emperors as representative of sinful humanity, proud in their attempts to be gods and greedy in their appetites. These kings seem far removed from our lives until we realize that we have gods of our own choosing, idols drawn from various entertainments or escapes from daily pressures. Continue Reading…

9 Inspirational Quotes from the Early Church

1500 Quotations for PreachersIn January, we announced 1,500 Quotations for Preachers, a five-volume series of quotations from throughout church history. These quotations are extremely helpful in putting together sermons, and can easily be pulled into presentations with the provided quotation slides.

Here are nine inspiring quotes from the Early Church volume:

  1. Tertullian on persecution: “The more often we are mown down by you, the more in number we grow; the blood of Christians is seed.”
  2. Jerome on Scripture reading and prayer: “Let the divine scripture be always in your hands, and give yourself so frequently to prayer that such shafts of evil thoughts as ever assail the young may thereby find a shield to repel them.”
  3. Augustine on procrastination: “God has promised pardon to your conversion; He has not promised a tomorrow to your delay.”
  4. Chrysostom on reconciliation: “We are commanded to have only one enemy, the devil. With him never be reconciled! But with a brother, never be at enmity in your heart.”
  5. Athanasius on the renewal of creation: “The renewal of creation has been the work of the self-same Word that made it at the beginning.”
  6. Cyril of Jerusalem on God’s mercy: “Your accumulated offenses do not surpass the multitude of God’s mercies; your wounds do not surpass the great physician’s skill.”
  7. Gregory of Nazianzus on God’s greatness: “No one has yet breathed the whole air, nor has any mind entirely comprehended, or speech exhaustively contained, the being of God.”
  8. Syncletica of Alexandria on the integrity of teachers: “A man whose house is about to fall down may invite travelers inside to refresh them, but instead they are hurt in the collapse of the house. It is the same with teachers who have not carefully trained themselves in the good life: they ruin their hearers as well as themselves.”
  9. Irenaeus on truth and error: “Error, indeed, is never set forth in its naked deformity, lest, being thus exposed, it should at once be detected. But it is craftily decked out in an attractive dress, so as by its outward form, to make it appear to the inexperienced (ridiculous as the expression may seem) more true than the truth itself.”

Be sure to pick up 1,500 Quotations for Preachers before the price goes up April 9!

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