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Earn Knox Credit at Camp Logos

Knox LogosMorris Proctor’s Camp Logos events help you master Logos’ powerful features. Now you can get academic credit for what you learn. When you attend Camp Logos, you’ll earn three credits toward your MA or DMin from Knox Theological Seminary—that’s an entire class’ worth! Find the Camp Logos event nearest you at MPSeminars.com/Camp-Logos.

Nine days of summer Bible study

June 20–25, Knox’s DMin program is coming to Bellingham. Dr. Warren Gage will be teaching “Gospel Hermeneutics 1: Typology, Symbol, and the Christ” at Logos’ headquarters. You’ll study parables, signs and symbols, allegory, and more, seeking to read the Bible as first-century Christians would have read it. Right after that, Morris Proctor will be teaching Camp Logos—again at Logos HQ—from June 26 to 28.

That’s nine days of immersive Bible study in the gorgeous Pacific Northwest. Come for the DMin class, come for Camp Logos (and its Knox credit!), or get in on both—you’ll want to be there.

Save your seat at Dr. Gage’s class and Camp Logos today. We’ll see you in Bellingham!

Another Way to Earn Your DMin Free

Knox Theological Seminary’s $18,000 Leith Anderson Scholarship is back! Enter to earn your DMin free at DMin.me/Leith-Anderson—the scholarship closes May 10.

This spring, Knox is introducing a new DMin track: “The Gospel in Church and Culture,” coordinated by Dr. Jim Belcher. The track draws on Scripture and Christian tradition to help pastors transform individuals, communities, and society.

If you start before June, you can take Dr. Belcher’s “Mission and Tradition: Seeking Balance in Ministry.” The class will look at the emerging and traditional churches, seeking a third way for the twenty-first century—a path between tradition and modernity.

Congratulations to Gary Golike!

Gary Golike

Gary Golike is the winner of our last Leith Anderson Scholarship. He’s a pastor in Nebraska with 33 years’ ministry experience. Gary is coming out of a sabbatical—he writes, “[The scholarship] comes at a perfect time in my life, and will fulfill a long-desired dream to continue my biblical and theological education. . . . [I feel that the] opportunity to study at Knox is an intentional gift from God.”

“As a teenager,” Gary writes, “I began to wander and attempted to live in both worlds, staying close to life in the church, but also getting involved in worldly behavior. . . . After struggling through a philosophy class that emphasized existentialism and also some relationship issues, I was suddenly struck with the foolishness and purposelessness of my attempts to find my way apart from God’s will.”

If Gary’s wanderings sound familiar, it’s because the tension he faced—between church and culture, tradition and modernity—is the same tension dealt with in Knox’s new Gospel in Church and Culture track. That tension is ancient, and it demands nuanced answers.

Save your seat in Knox’s Gospel in Church and Culture track today.

Then enter to win the $18,000 Leith Anderson Scholarship!

Learn Ministry from the Best

bryan chapellKnox Theological Seminary welcomes its newest professor: Dr. Bryan Chapell, distinguished professor of preaching, MDiv, PhD. Dr. Chapell comes to Knox from Covenant Theological Seminary, where he’s president emeritus and adjunct professor of practical theology. He was Covenant’s president from 1994 to 2012.

Dr. Chapell is the author of Christ-Centered Preaching, Using Illustrations to Preach with Power, and other important works. He’ll be teaching introductory homiletics in Knox’s master’s programs and contributing to the DMin’s Preaching and Teaching track. More than that, he’ll be working to strengthen Knox’s culture as a seminary that revels in grace.

Dr. Michael Allen, Knox’s dean of faculty, says, “Few people understand the rhythm of gospel-driven Christianity and its effects on Christ-centered preaching like Dr. Bryan Chapell. For these reasons—dear to our convictions about being a Christ-centered, gospel-driven, mission-focused seminary—we couldn’t be more excited about Dr. Chapell joining the faculty.”

Who you learn from matters

Dr. Chapell isn’t Knox’s only academic heavyweight. Drs. Michael Allen, Jim Belcher, Gerald Bray, Warren Gage, Samuel Lamerson, Jonathan Linebaugh, Haddon Robinson, Bruce Waltke—these are some of our time’s leading teachers and thinkers, and you can learn from them directly.

If you’re passionate about preaching and Bible study, you should always be learning. And Knox gives you the chance to learn from the best. See how Knox’s degrees fit your life at DMin.me and SeminaryDegreesOnline.com.

Know the Arguments for Skepticism and Common Sense

The rationalists relied on reason, not sensory experience, to explain the world. In turn, the empiricists—John Locke, George Berkeley, and David Hume—argued that knowledge comes from experience, not pure reason. Taken as far as logic allows, that entails some astonishing claims about reality.

Primary and secondary qualities

For Locke, primary qualities exist in the world, and secondary qualities in the perceiver. Solidity, extension, shape, motion, number—these exist whether they’re perceived or not. But attributes like color, sound, and scent exist only when perceived; there can be no image without an eye. (He didn’t reject reason altogether; rather, he thought that knowledge comes from the application of reason to sensory data.)

Berkeley, moved by Locke’s arguments regarding the uncertainty of secondary qualities, went further: he rejected Locke’s primary qualities, too. Berkeley thought that the distinction between qualities invites all sorts of skepticism. If we know only our own ideas, how can we trust them without ever comparing them to unmediated reality?

Perceptions, not material objects

The solution is simple: deny the existence of matter. If an apple is not only our collection of perceptions but also a material object, we may doubt that object, and such doubt is abhorrent to common sense. But if we define the apple as nothing more than our perceptions, it is beyond doubt.

The world doesn’t exist on its own, Berkeley argued—only perceptions do. Being is nothing more than being perceived.

Do objects come in and out of existence as we perceive them? Not quite. God always sees all things; thanks only to his perception, objects persist.

Hume’s doubt of the self

Hume, the most rigorous of the empiricists, developed Berkeley’s claims against the world to their logical end. People, he argued, “are nothing but a bundle or collection of different perceptions, which succeed each other with inconceivable rapidity, and are in a perpetual flux and movement.” Since there is no perception of self, there is no self.

This has some incredible consequences:

  • It invalidates Descartes’ “I think, therefore I am,” which now merely assumes the “I” it would prove.
  • It erases the distinction between self and world, which had so long dominated Western thought.
  • It precludes the soul.

But that’s ridiculous!

Hume took empiricism so far that, for most people, it became unbelievable. In turn, Thomas Reid argued that belief in the world is the basis for meaningful philosophy—that if you don’t believe in the world as perceived, philosophy is useless. The difference between object and sensation, he argued, is obvious to common sense. In response to Hume’s doubt of the self, Reid noted that, in order to talk about philosophy, you must believe that you’re talking with another person. If you don’t, you’re insane, and not worth engaging in conversation. Refreshing, no?

On Reid’s common-sense foundation, Alvin Plantinga and Nicholas Wolterstorff developed the modern notion of Reformed epistemology, which defines belief in God as “properly basic”—belief that need not be proven from other truths. Despite the lack of irrefutable arguments for other minds, we believe in them; believing in God is just as reasonable.

Understand skepticism and common sense

Together, the Classics in Empiricist Philosophy Collection and The Works of Thomas Reid give you Locke’s, Berkeley’s, Hume’s, and Reid’s essential arguments, all searchable and cross-referenced. You’ll know the evidence for and against empiricism and common-sense philosophy, and you’ll understand Reformed epistemology’s foundations. Both collections are on Community Pricing for around 80% off; with more bids, the price could go even lower.

Know the arguments for skepticism and common sense—place your bids today:

Then sign up to get news and updates about more classic works of history, literature, and philosophy:





 
Keep reading—now that you know the empiricists, who were the rationalists?

Rational Arguments for God and the World

For many philosophers, God’s existence resolves otherwise unsolvable puzzles. The great rationalistsRené Descartes, Baruch Spinoza, and Gottfried Leibniz—argued that knowledge comes not from the senses, but from reason and innate ideas. From there, they developed some fascinating notions of God and the world.

Descartes

Widely considered the father of modern philosophy, Descartes introduced Cartesian doubt and the cogito. In his Discourse on Method and Meditations, he resolved to doubt all that could be doubted. Can you doubt that you’re reading this blog post? Of course; you might be dreaming. Can you doubt that a square has four sides? Yes; a demon might be causing you to err. But a demon couldn’t trick you if you didn’t exist at all. Hence his famous cogito: “I think, therefore I am” (Cogito, ergo sum).

So why not continue doubting the whole world? Because God is good. Our inclination to believe in the world is so strong that if the world did not exist, God would be deceitful; therefore, the world exists.

Spinoza

Baruch Spinoza understood God as in every way infinite. Thought and matter, he argued, are attributes of God, and so are human souls. The chief end of humanity is not personal immortality, but union with the divine.

If the world is an attribute of God, to understand the world is to understand God. “The mind’s highest good,” Spinoza wrote in Ethics, “is the knowledge of God, and the mind’s highest virtue is to know God.” That’s a description, though, not a command—according to Spinoza, if you understand the world, such a higher good is inevitable. If you know all things to point to God, the idea of God will fully occupy your mind.

Leibniz

Building on arguments that stretch back to Aristotle, Leibniz refined four proofs of God’s existence:

  1. Ontological. In an argument built on St. Anselm and Descartes, Leibniz argued in Monadology that “There is . . . or there can be conceived, a subject of all perfections, or most perfect Being. . . . it follows also that he exists, for existence is among the number of the perfections.” That is, the essence of God is perfection, and a God who exists is better than a God who does not; therefore, God exists.
  2. Cosmological. Aristotle noted that all actions have causes, which in turn have causes, which in turn have causes. But the series can’t be infinite; the first action must be uncaused. God is the universe’s uncaused cause. Leibniz, in turn, saw the universe as contingent—not demanded by logic, not inevitable. Given that logic permits the universe not to be, and that the universe contains no reason for its being, it points to a reason beyond itself: God.
  3. Eternal truth. Leibniz observed that statements—thoughts—are true in different ways. Though “it’s sunny” may sometimes (or, in Bellingham, rarely) be true, “2 + 2 = 4” is true eternally. And thoughts are the work of minds. An eternal truth must be the work of an eternal mind: God’s.
  4. Design. The world, noted Leibniz, is full of things that can’t be explained by blind natural forces. Such things testify to a creator. Though Leibniz advanced this argument long before Darwin proposed evolution, Leibniz’s point sounds familiar: it’s the thrust of today’s Intelligent Design.

Such notions and proofs of God aren’t biblical, of course. They’re grounded in pure reason, and that’s what makes them fascinating. It’s worth remembering that, in seeking to explain the world, some of the West’s most important thinkers turned to God.

The Classics in Rationalist Philosophy Collection articulates these arguments and more

And right now, it’s on Community Pricing at 84% off! With more bids, the price could go even lower.

Revisit some of philosophy’s most interesting arguments about God, mind, and the worldplace your bid now.

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Win the $18,000 Leith Anderson Scholarship!

Demetrius Walton

John Piper Scholarship winner: Demetrius Walton

Earn your Knox DMin free with a brand-new scholarship: the $18,000 Leith Anderson Scholarship! Enter to win at SeminaryDegreesOnline.com/Leith-Anderson before March 1.

You’ll attend onsite classes in Ft. Lauderdale, FL, and complete the rest of your studies from home, on your own schedule. And you’ll use Logos 5’s enormous Portfolio library: a cutting-edge academic tool that’s yours for life.

Winner of the John Piper Scholarship: Demetrius Walton

Congratulations, Demetrius Walton—you won last fall’s John Piper Scholarship!

Demetrius is an army chaplain serving in the Middle East. His focuses are family ministry and marital counseling, and he trains other chaplains to be better counselors. Demetrius grew up in a New Age household, but thanks to Young Life, he started to move toward God; in 2000, with the help of The Navigators’ ministry, he became a Christian. He went on to teach at Bible college and serve as a missionary in Cambodia.

Demetrius’ comprehensive John Piper Scholarship will give him the financial means to grow as a teacher and a preacher. He plans to return to Asia—to China, to train and equip young pastors in the underground church.

What would you do with the flexibility afforded by a comprehensive scholarship, a curriculum that lets you keep your job and church while you study, and a terminal degree? Serve abroad, like Demetrius? Step up in your local church? Support your family with answers from the Word? Whatever your goals, Knox’s Gospel-centered education can help you achieve them.

Earn your doctorate at no cost—enter to win the Leith Anderson Scholarship before March 1!

You Could Be the Next Winner of the $25,000 Billy Graham Scholarship!

Steve LangellaKnox Theological Seminary’s $25,000 Billy Graham Scholarship is back! Enter to win at SeminaryDegreesOnline.com/Billy-Graham before March 1. If you win, you’ll earn your MA (Biblical & Theological Studies) at no cost.

You’ll get:

  • Logos 5’s vast Portfolio library, an academic advantage that’s yours for life
  • A $1,000 Logos.com credit for additional books
  • Logos’ deep academic discounts, so your $1,000 will go even further

What’s more, if you’re among the first 100 students to enroll this spring, you’re guaranteed at least a $2,520 scholarship.

Last fall’s winner: Steve Langella!

We’re pleased to congratulate Steve Langella, of Brooklyn, NY, on winning the previous Billy Graham Scholarship. Steve was born again in 1987; at the time, he was 24 and a bartender. He “began to feel restless and empty,” and one day he wanted nothing more than to go to church. He prayed, “Lord, I know that I am a sinner and that I have disobeyed you my whole life. Please save me and change my life.” God did, and Steve joined a church in Brooklyn, where came to realize that preaching and teaching were his spiritual gifts. In 2006, at 43, he decided to earn his BA in religion. Now he’ll be earning his master’s.

He says, “[this scholarship] will help me become better equipped to fulfill God’s calling in my life. It will . . . [afford] me the opportunity to continue my biblical education and not incur further debt . . . I believe that this scholarship will enable me to do what I could otherwise not to, which is sit at the feet of Gospel-centered men . . . and learn from their experience.”

The chance to become better equipped, to continue your biblical education debt-free, to fulfill your spiritual gifts—you could get all that, too. The Billy Graham Scholarship is back, and you could be the next winner!

Earn your master’s for free

Entry closes March 1. Don’t wait—enter to win at SeminaryDegreesOnline.com/Billy-Graham!

The Francis Schaeffer Scholarship Winner Announced!

PameliaWe have a winner: Pamelia Harris!

Pamelia, of Ft. Lauderdale, FL, is the executive director at Mount Bethel Baptist Church. She’s involved with the New Visions Community Development Corporation, which, using Dave Ramsey’s financial principles, has helped more than 2,500 low- to moderate-income homeowners save money and rebuild credit. She’s active in her church’s food pantry, she’s helped start a women’s ministry, and she’s helped write curricula for women’s Bible studies. Pamelia mentors girls and young women through the Delta Academy. She wants to be used by the Lord to “help single mothers become women of God and raise successful children.”

Pamelia wasn’t sure if she could afford seminary, and now that’s not a problem. She says, “It [her Knox master’s degree] will help me in every area of my life and ministry and give me more confidence in the Word when counseling women.”

In short: “I’m over the top!” Congrats, Pamelia!

$18,000 more—the Francis Schaeffer Scholarship returns

Starting today, the Francis Schaeffer Scholarship is back! Enter to win at SeminaryDegreesOnline.com/Francis-Schaeffer-Scholarshipentry closes March 1.

You’ll get:

  • Ministry training grounded in the West’s literary and cultural traditions
  • Logos 5 Platinum, worth over $28,000 in print
  • A $400 Logos credit for additional books, and Logos’ deep academic discount for the duration of your enrollment

And if you’re among the first 100 students to enroll in the MACCS spring semester, you’re guaranteed a partial scholarship of over $2,000.

Earn your master’s for free—enter to win at SeminaryDegreesOnline.com/Francis-Schaeffer-Scholarship!

New DMin Track: Theological Exegesis

Today’s post is built around content from Michael Allen, coordinator of the theological exegesis track and D. James Kennedy Associate Professor of Systematic Theology at Knox Theological Seminary.

Knox Theological Seminary is proud to introduce the world’s first Doctor of Ministry track in theological exegesis. In this program, you’ll learn to interpret and explain Scripture in the context of theology, taking what has been mostly an academic conversation and connecting it to the lives and communities of Christians worldwide.

The track emphasizes canonical, creedal, and contextual biblical interpretation:

  • You’ll read each passage in light of the scriptural canon’s broader context, and you’ll see how each piece fits into the Gospel message of Jesus Christ and his kingdom.
  • You’ll use the church’s creeds and confessions (past and present) as prompts to refine your interpretive work, and you’ll learn to see the past as a constant presence for the community of faith.
  • You’ll understand the Word’s answers to modern questions and struggles.

Classes start this month with Michael Allen’s “Hebrews: Exegesis and Theology.” As you study Hebrews, you’ll learn to read the Old Testament overall by studying how the epistle’s anonymous author exegetes Israel’s Scriptures. You’ll familiarize yourself with both classical and contemporary works, growing in your capacity to recognize wisdom in disparate sources. And you’ll see how this ancient text addresses compelling issues today.

Knox’s theological exegesis track is your chance to master nuanced interpretation and life-changing preaching without giving up your ministry responsibilities. Take the first step toward your DMin—explore the new track at DMin.me/course-tracks/exegesis.

Last Chance: Win a Full Scholarship for Your MA or DMin!

Earn your degree—free

On December 31, at 11:59 p.m. (PST), entry closes for Knox Theological Seminary and Logos Bible Software’s $25,000 Billy Graham Scholarship and $18,000 John Piper Scholarship. The Billy Graham Scholarship covers your MA (Biblical & Theological Studies), and the John Piper Scholarship covers your DMin; no matter what, if you’re among the first 100 students accepted into the MABTS’ spring 2013 semester, you’ll win a partial scholarship of $2,520.

That means you have just six days left to get in on $295,000 in total scholarship funds!

Keep your job and church

Knox’s world-class degree programs let you study the Word without giving up your other commitments. If you pursue your master’s degree, you’ll complete 100 percent of your coursework online, choosing when and where you study. If you decide to earn your doctorate, you’ll learn from some of the world’s leading Bible scholars at up to four classes a year in Ft. Lauderdale, FL; the rest of your coursework you’ll complete from home, on your own time. Either way, you’ll use Logos’ largest, smartest library, Portfolio—a superb academic advantage, yours for the rest of your life.

Last chance to win

Again, entry for all scholarships closes at the end of the day on the 31st. Entering takes just seconds, but the deadline’s almost here. Enter to win your MABTS or DMin today!

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