Archive by Author

Explore the Language of the Early Church

HarpersLatinDictionaryWe pay a lot of attention to the Bible’s original Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic, but many of the early church’s most important texts were written in another language: Latin. Luckily, Logos offers some outstanding Latin reference works and primary sources that can bring you closer to the ancient world.

Let’s start exploring:

Get the best Latin dictionary

Choosing scholarly resources can come down to preference—we all have our favorite authors, our favorite exegetical methods, our favorite reference works. But sometimes there’s no room for debate: sometimes one resource is clearly the standard in its field.

Lewis and Short’s Latin Dictionary is that resource. For those of us who’re fascinated by the ancient world, it’s simply the finest Latin dictionary available.

Scholars choose Lewis and Short because of its breadth. It gives you 2,019 pages’ worth of lexical data, spanning classical times through the early modern era; that makes it an important aid whether you’re working through Irenaeus or through Aquinas. If you’re studying Christian history, you’ll be working with Latin. If you’re working with Latin, you’ll want this dictionary.

Moreover, it’s in the Logos edition that Lewis and Short really shines. Those 2,019 pages can be hard to navigate in print, to say nothing of the legwork involved in cross-referencing them against the patristic hard copies (if you can even access any). With Logos,* everything is indexed for precise searches, and you can jump right from an entry to a primary source and vice versa. It’s that mixture of scholarly rigor and right-now usefulness that’s earned Lewis and Short such glowing reviews: other Logos users write that “[t]his is THE Latin dictionary,” that it’s “easily the best Latin dictionary ever made,” that it’s “stellar,” that “no hard copy can even begin to compete with what we can do with a Logos dictionary.”

Navigate the early church’s culture with the finest Latin dictionary available: pick up Lewis and Short right now.

* For now, Lewis and Short is only available for desktop, not mobile.

Then choose from these important primary sources:

early-church-fathers-protestant-edition1. Early Church Fathers

Augustine, Irenaeus, Clement of Alexandria, Tertullian, Eusebius, Origen—this massive collection sets you up with English translations of the postapostolic era’s most important works. It’s a window into the origins of a great deal of Christian doctrine, which makes it a fascinating way to revisit the foundations of your faith. Pick up the Early Church Fathers collection and explore the early church’s world.

2. The Works of Prudentius

The poems of Prudentius, who was educated in religion, literature, and rhetoric, are shot through with biblical influence. His most important work is the Psychomachia, which is considered the first major Christian allegory; that means it paved the way for classics like the Divine Comedy and The Pilgrim’s Progress. You’re already studying the early church’s theologians. Now, while the four-volume Works of Prudentius is on Community Pricing, you can study its poetry for 73% off.

works-of-ovid-and-horace3. Works of Ovid and Horace

Latin literature’s three canonical poets are Virgil, Ovid, and Horace. Though they weren’t Christian writers, it’s important to know their work, which was hugely influential in the ancient world. You can get Virgil’s Aeneid in the famous Harvard Classics Collection; Ovid and Horace you can get in the incredibly rich Works of Ovid and Horace. (The standout volume is Ovid’s Metamorphoses, one of the most influential poems in literary history.) Get in on the best price—bid on Ovid’s and Horace’s collected works for 83% off!

4. Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things

In Acts 17:18, Paul addresses Epicurean and Stoic philosophers. If you’re curious about Paul’s context, you’ll want to look into Epicureanism, one of the most popular worldviews in early Christian times; the best way to do so is through the writings of Lucretius. (Epicurus’ magnum opus, On Nature, was destroyed, but Lucretius’ On the Nature of Things builds on Epicurus’ thought.) Right now, On the Nature of Things is 72% off on Community Pricing—place your bid before the price goes up.

Pick up Lewis and Short today, and then choose the primary sources that fit your study!

Get a Better Understanding of the Ancient World for Just $7

Hediod CollectionWe tend to think of ancient Greece (and the ancient world generally) as belonging to a single period: antiquity. The closer we look, though, the less antiquity looks like one internally consistent era—in fact, ancient Greece had its own internal rupture between ancient and modern. Between the two are the fascinating works of Homer and Hesiod.

The Greeks’ own Greek classics

By the time Aristotle composed his first arguments against Plato, the works of Homer and Hesiod were already hundreds of years old and venerated as classics. Most modern historians place Homer between 800 and 700 BC; Hesiod was active between 750 and 650 BC. (For reference, that puts us squarely in OT times: around then, Isaiah would have been carrying out his ministry in Judah.) Homer you know from his epics the Iliad and the Odyssey; Hesiod you know from the story of Pandora’s Box, which was actually a jar. The Greeks thought of Homer and Hesiod as a pair: the former gave the culture its great shared narratives, and the latter filled in the details—Hesiod described Greek mythology, farming, economics, astronomy, time-keeping, and more. Generally, his poems are didactic: they told the ancient Greeks how to live. Between Homer’s myth-building and Hesiod’s instructional goals (not to mention his exacting detail), these poems give us a remarkable window into ancient Greece.

A vexed relationship with the past

One of the things that make Homer and Hesiod so interesting is how they negotiated their own sense of ancient and modern. Bertrand Russell writes, “The Olympian gods, who represent religion in Homer, were not the only objects of worship among the Greeks, either in his time or later. There were other darker and more savage elements in popular religion, which were kept at bay by the Greek intellect at its best.” H.J. Rose describes these elements in his Primitive Culture in Ancient Greece: there were statues of Pan, which were beaten when food was scarce; there was a cave favored by the wolf-Zeus, in which no one cast a shadow and after entering which no one survived longer than a year; there was a clan of possible werewolves. We associate ancient Greece with pure reason, but all of this was still going on in classical times.

Russell argues that “The Homeric poems, like the courtly romances of the later Middle Ages, represent the point of view of a civilized aristocracy, which ignores as plebeian various superstitions that are still rampant among the populace. . . . Guided by anthropology, modern writers have come to the conclusion that Homer, so far from being primitive, was an expurgator . . . holding up an upper-class ideal of urban enlightenment.” That is, Homer’s works aren’t just a window into ancient Greece—they were a biased, active hand in shaping its religious customs.

We see a converse phenomenon in Hesiod, and this time the primitive customs are the Olympian myths themselves. Hesiod’s Theogony lays out Greek belief point by point, from the creation of the universe through the gods’ rise to power. The interesting part, though, isn’t what he writes—it’s how he was read. Even as the Greeks began to turn away from this mythology and seek purely rational explanations for the world, they continued to read Hesiod out of a sense of tradition: out of respect for antiquity.

It’s easy to think of the ancients as credulous, grasping at the nearest magical explanation for the phenomena around them. What we see in Homer and Hesiod, though, is a self-aware tension between past and present—one that feels very modern. Homer distances himself from ancient pagan belief to advocate for the Olympian pantheon. Hesiod fleshes out that Olympian pantheon but is, as the times change, relegated to a mere emeritus role. In many ways, the relationship of ancient Greece to its own antiquity looks like the relationship of modernity to ancient Greece. That’s what makes Homer and Hesiod so interesting: they represent not only timeless literature, but also an influential culture navigating its past and present.

* * *

Get 61% off Hesiod, the Homeric hymns, and the Homerica

You know how important ancient Greece is—it gave us mathematics, history, philosophy, and more. (In turn, Platonism contributed to the Christianity of the early Church Fathers and, in particular, helped bring about Augustine’s conversion and some of his most interesting thought.) If you’re interested in ancient history and biblical context, ancient Greece should be part of your study.

You also know how important the Iliad and the Odyssey are: if you don’t own these masterpieces, stop reading this post, add them to your Logos library, and start enjoying them today.

But Homer’s lesser-known works—the hymns and Homerica—and Hesiod’s writings give you an especially nuanced window into ancient Greek culture. Now Noet is building these classic texts in tagged, research-friendly editions that sync with the rest of your library and give you access to Logos’ powerful study tools. Currently, Noet’s two-volume Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica is just $7 on Community Pricing­—that’s 61% off!

Once you’ve added these important texts, you can get the big picture with one of Noet’s research libraries: the Classical Greek Bundle gives you the Iliad, Homeric GrammarLiddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon (LSJ), and more; better yet, the complete Classical Foundations Bundle gives you everything in the Classical Greek Bundle, plus essential works of philosophy, additional original-language resources, the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection, and far more.

Bid on Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns and Homerica for just $7, and then pick the Noet library that’s right for you!

Get 44% Off the New Kittredge Shakespeare Collection

new-kittredge-shakespeare-collectionShakespeare, wrote Ben Johnson, “was not of an age, but for all time!”

He wrote in a spectacular English that shaped how we speak today. He described the human condition—love, doubt, revenge, laughter—in all its beauty and confusion. He gave the culture a series of almost universally recognized images and stories.

Any one of these accomplishments would have secured his place in history. That Shakespeare achieved them all is astonishing.

Logos is building his major works in a series of very special editions: the 25-volume New Kittredge Shakespeare Collection. It’s on Pre-Pub for 44% off, but the price is about to go up. If you love language and literature, or if you’re interested in understanding the culture by way of one its most important pillars, you’ll want to pre-order this one right now.

Kittredge?

George Kittredge (1860–1941) was a literary critic in the classical mold—multilingual, witty, academically rigorous, staggeringly well-read. He taught quite a few classes at Harvard, among them English 2, the beloved Shakespeare survey that first earned him fame. From all those years of teaching came his annotated Shakespeare editions, which remained the standard in American scholarship long after his death.

Kittredge was a “philologist”: a student of literature who approached his work with a historian’s concern for cultural context and a scientist’s demand for rigorous proof. Academia, no less than other human institutions, is subject to trends; halfway through the twentieth century, philology was replaced by New Criticism, which sought to examine texts in a vacuum, independent of culture and authorship. Subsequent academic schools—above all, New Historicism—returned to Kittredge’s interest in context, but in a newly postmodern intellectual climate, his would-be-scientific rigor seemed pedantic or naïve. Like philology, Kittredge never came back into style.

It’s modern criticism’s loss: that philological lens makes his Shakespeare collection incredibly rich. For Kittredge, the object of study wasn’t just Shakespeare—it was the past itself. Now, with the research-friendly Logos editions (imagine how Kittredge would have loved the cross-references!), you can rediscover the Shakespeare collection that the Ivory Tower forgot.

“Without Tyndale, no Shakespeare”

You know that Shakespeare’s an important window into the culture. What you may not know is that Shakespeare’s works are shot through with biblical references. Shakespeare, it seems, had much of the Bible almost memorized.

These aren’t word-for-word quotations; Shakespeare didn’t cite Scripture directly. Rather, he incorporated its language to imbue his works with a layer of special drama. You have to know your Bible to pick up on most of these allusions. (Hamlet, in the face of despair, tells Horatio, “There is special providence in the fall of a sparrow”; attentive readers will hear the echo of Matthew 10:29.) Specifically, Shakespeare was a beneficiary of the work of William Tyndale, whose widely available translation gave England a vast bank of shared references (like “the fall of a sparrow”) and encouraged a literate culture. David Daniell, founder of the Tyndale Society, went so far as to say that without Tyndale, there could be no Shakespeare.

The connections between Shakespeare and Christianity merit more than this passing mention; if you’d like to learn more, you can pick up several volumes on the topic with Logos’ Shakespeare and Christianity Collection. In the meantime, though, suffice it to say that reading Shakespeare need not come at the expense of reading your Bible—you’ll be surprised and delighted to encounter traces of Scripture all through his most famous works.

* * *

The New Kittredge Shakespeare Collection is 44% off on Pre-Pub, but it’s moving fast—the price is going up very soon. This is your chance to own one of humanity’s literary treasures, curated and explained by one of the twentieth century’s greatest scholars and critics.

Don’t let this one pass you by—pre-order the New Kittredge Shakespeare Collection right now.

Get the Best Price on Treasured American Adventures

Among American literature’s greatest achievements is its longstanding marriage of high art and high adventure. Melville, Twain, Cooper, London—some of America’s greatest writers set their dramas against America’s spectacular rivers, seas, and tracts of wilderness.

These aren’t just important works of literature. They’re gripping adventure tales, long ago integrated into the American national consciousness.

And now you can get them in the single most useful, reader-friendly format they’ve ever appeared in: Logos.

Take 80% off the Select Works of Herman Melville

select-works-of-herman-melville“In the winter of 1851,” wrote Jorge Luis Borges, “Melville published Moby-Dick, the infinite novel that brought about his fame. Page by page, the story grows until it takes on the dimensions of the cosmos: at the beginning the reader might consider the subject to be the miserable life of whale harpooners; then, that the subject is the madness of Captain Ahab, bent on pursuing and destroying the white whale; finally, that the whale and Ahab and the pursuit which exhausts the oceans of the planet are symbols and mirrors of the universe.”

There are many “great American novels.” In scope, in ambition, Moby-Dick is perhaps the greatest.

Noet’s new Select Works of Herman Melville collection gives you not only Moby-Dick but also The Piazza Tales, Typee, Omoo, and The Confidence-Man, all important texts in their own right. For a just a little while, the collection is on Community Pricing for just $12—that’s 80% off!

Once it covers costs, though, the price is going up; this deal won’t last long. Get the best price on Melville’s select works—bid right now.

Take 79% off the Select Works of Mark Twain

select-works-of-mark-twainMark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is Moby-Dick’s leading rival for the title of great American novel. Faulkner called Twain “the father of American literature.” Hemingway (on what else could he and Faulkner agree?) wrote that “All modern American literature comes from [Huckleberry Finn]. . . . the best book we’ve had.” Appleton’s magazine wrote that “[Twain] will be recognized as one of the most national of American authors, and one of the peculiar glories of American literature.” The Select Works of Mark Twain collection gives you not only Huckleberry Finn but also its predecessor, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and a series of enthralling travelogues and works of speculative fiction.

Bid now for 79% off!

Take 60% off the Select Works of James Fenimore Cooper

select-works-of-james-fenimore-cooper

“[Cooper] is a poet; and if his creations should not be immortal, it will be the work of the perverse and incalculable accidents of time”
The New-York Review

Cooper’s series of Leatherstocking Tales novels, which detail the adventures of frontiersman Natty Bumppo, are in large part responsible for romanticizing the American wild; the wild, in turn, was a hugely important building block in America’s self-image. These books don’t just show you the frontier—in the American imagination, they helped constitute it.

Get these important works for 60% off: bid before the price goes up!

Take 56% off the Select Works of Jack London

select-works-of-jack-londonLondon’s famous adventures bring together philosophical speculation and gritty realism. The Call of the Wild and White Fang explore the relationship between civilization and wilderness; White Fang, in particular, is regarded as an allegorical account of London’s own transition from his troubled teenage years into middle-class adulthood. The cerebral Sea Wolf follows the adventures of a shipwrecked literary critic who’s taken in by an amoral but highly intelligent captain; it’s an oblique attempt to refute Nietzsche’s theory of the superman. The Iron Heel, arguably the first modern dsytopia, anticipated the twentieth and twenty-first centuries’ formal experimentation and even influenced Orwell; today, it seems very far ahead of its time.

Place your bid for 56% off!

* * *

Great literature doesn’t have to be boring, and these American classics prove it. They’re adventures that you’ll read and reread, and then pass down to your children.

Own some of America’s literary treasures—bid right now!

Understand Early Christianity’s Roman Context

the-history-of-the-decline-and-fall-of-the-roman-empire

“In the second century of the Christian era, the Empire of Rome comprehended the fairest part of the earth, and the most civilised portion of mankind. The frontiers of that extensive monarchy were guarded by ancient renown and disciplined valour. The gentle but powerful influence of laws and manners had gradually cemented the union of the provinces. Their peaceful inhabitants enjoyed and abused the advantages of wealth and luxury.”
—Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

“At the hour of midnight the Salerian gate was silently opened, and the inhabitants were awakened by the tremendous sound of the Gothic trumpet. Eleven hundred and sixty-three years after the foundation of Rome, the Imperial city, which had subdued and civilised so considerable a part of mankind, was delivered to the licentious fury of the tribes of Germany and Scythia.”
—Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

The rise and fall of imperial Rome constitute one of the most important narratives in Western history—Christian history in particular. The Romans contributed core elements to government, politics, art, engineering, and almost everything else we know as modern. Under Nero, Maximinus Thrax, and Decius, Rome subjected Christians to atrocities. Under Constantine, Rome helped Christianity flourish.

If you’re studying Christianity and overlooking Rome, you’re overlooking essential context.

Study Rome from its rise to its fall

Logos offers several important resources on ancient Rome—in particular, Polybius’ The Histories, Appian’s Roman History, Livy’s History of Rome, Cassius Dio’s Roman History, and Edward Gibbon’s History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. Together, these works set you up to study Roman history from its beginning to its end.

1. Rome’s rise

polybius-the-historiesPolybius’ The Histories gives you a fascinating look at Rome’s ascent between 264 and 146 BC. The Greek historiographer analyzes all the factors that contributed to Rome’s dominance: above all, strong leadership, the separation of powers, and advantages of geography.

Right now, The Histories is on Pre-Pub for 22% off, and the price is about to go up. You’ll want to pre-order this one right now.

2. Rome’s zenith

  • Appian’s Roman History is the only surviving account of the Roman civil wars, which were enormously important to Rome’s trajectory overall. Appian doesn’t name his sources outright, but scholars agree that Appian built on the work of Polybius; Logos lets you study these Roman histories side by side. And if you bid now, you can get Roman History for 73% off.
  • Livy’s History of Rome surveys Rome’s history from its mythical founding to the reign of Augustus. Livy offers narrative, not just chronology; in fact, books 1–10 and 21–30 have become defining examples of Golden Age Latin. Right now, History of Rome is on Community Pricing for a full 85% off!
  • Cassius Dio’s Roman History covers 1,400 years, from the founding of Rome to AD 229. Dio really shines in his treatment of events after the first century BC, many of which he witnessed firsthand; his account is unmatched in detail. You can get Dio’s Roman History for 78% off on Community Pricing.

3. Rome’s fall

Edward Gibbons classic History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire is by far the most famous work on ancient Rome, and Gibbon devotes several chapters to Christianity in the Roman world. In a 1997 review, History of the Christian Church magazine noted that “for fullness and general accuracy and artistic representation [Gibbon’s] work is still unsurpassed”; years earlier, no less a rhetor than Winston Churchill credited Gibbon’s lofty style with influencing his own. History of the Decline and Fall is a remarkable overview of the factors that contributed to Rome’s undoing and the lessons that Roman history holds for world powers today. Plus, at $17.95, it’s an astonishing value.

Study Roman context with the best resources

Most of these works are on Community Pricing, which means that prices are going up very soon. Likewise, Polybius’ The Histories is on Pre-Pub, but it won’t be for long—if you’re at all interested in the ancient world, you should pre-order it now.

Pre-order Polybius’ The Histories right now, and add a more modern perspective with Gibbon’s History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
 

Then keep reading—how did Augustine influence philosophy?

Augustine’s Philosophical Importance

Augustine_of_HippoAugustine is a hugely important figure in church history. He’s a big deal outside the church, too—in fact, he’s one of the most important figures in pure philosophy.

Here’s why.

Augustine beat Kant to his theory of subjective time

Immanuel Kant (1724–1804) was one of the fathers of modern philosophy. He argued, among many other things, that time doesn’t exist outside consciousness—that it’s “nothing other than the form of inner sense.” That subjective view of time has proved hugely important. Thing is, Kant wasn’t the first to think of it—Augustine, in the third century AD, came to more or less the same conclusion in book XI of the Confessions.

The problem that started it all: given the Genesis 1 account of creation, shouldn’t creation have occurred sooner—that is, as soon as possible? Augustine argues that time itself was created when the world was created; God, eternal, is exempt from linear time and all notions of before and after. It’s here that Augustine beats Kant to the punch. “What, then, is time?” he wonders. “If no one asks of me, I know; if I wish to explain to him who asks, I know not.” He concludes that the present is all that really exists; the past exists only as memory; the future, as expectation. Time is in and of the human mind, and that’s Kant in a nutshell.

Augustine beat Descartes to his cogito

modern-philosophy-bundleCogito, ergo sum,” wrote René Descartes (1596–1650)—“I think, therefore I am.” Descartes resolved to doubt all that could be doubted, and concluded that pretty much all sensory input is subject to skepticism. That position admits as trustworthy only the bare fact of mental existence. (By the way, Descartes later concluded that his own extreme doubt, though possible, was unreasonable—since God is good, he wouldn’t lead us astray; therefore, the senses can be trusted.) Descartes’ cogito has been enormously influential.

But Augustine, in his Soliloquia, comes to the very same conclusion:

“You, who wish to know, do you know who you are? I know it. Whence are you? I know not. Do you feel yourself single or multiple? I know not. Do you feel yourself moved? I know not. Do you know that you think? I do.” (emphasis added)

Sorry, Descartes.

Augustine incorporated and modified Platonism

ancient-philosophy-bundleFor Augustine, the writings of Plato were “the most pure and bright in all philosophy, scattering the clouds of error”—in fact, Platonism helped bring Augustine to Christianity. Through Plotinus, Augustine adopted many of Plato’s teachings:

  • Augustine’s City of God is to his City of Man what Plato’s higher plane—the plane of forms—is to our lower world.
  • Plato believed in absolute, unchanging reality; for Augustine, this made Christianity’s radical claims, which he came to later in life, easier to accept.
  • Both thinkers treated logic and faith as complementary, not opposed.

What’s really interesting is that Augustine, unlike his Platonist predecessors, adapted Platonism into new philosophy that better conforms to Scripture. Let’s return to Genesis 1, for example. For Plato, and later Aristotle, creating something from nothing was unthinkable: in the Timaeus, Plato argued that a demiurge, or creator god, sculpted the universe’s forms from some preceding primitive matter. But Genesis is explicit—God created something from nothing—and so Augustine sees no room for confusion. Before him, Christian Platonists (like Origen) tended to incorporate Plato’s thought in whole; after him, Platonism answered to Scripture.

* * *

Augustine took the philosophy of the past and modified it for emerging Christianity. He developed original philosophy that prefigured the work of many of modernity’s most important thinkers. He’s important—and so is the larger conversation he’s such a big part of.

You can get the Logos editions (in both English and Latin) of Augustine’s Confessions and Select Letters for just $34.94—for such influential thought in such a research-friendly format, that’s a steal. Likewise, Noet’s Ancient and Modern Philosophy bundles give you the essential works of Kant, Descartes, Plato, and others.

Join the conversation: pick up Augustine’s Confessions and Select Letters, the Ancient Philosophy Bundle, and the Modern Philosophy Bundle right now.

Or start studying the ultimate classical library: Noet’s immense Classical Foundations Bundle, which gives you 124 volumes spanning philosophy, history, literature, and the classics.

 
Then keep reading—what do philosophy and theology have to do with math?

Get 89% Off the Select Works of John Dewey

select-works-of-john-deweyHow do you judge a system of thought?

Do you judge it by how well it mirrors reality, or by how well it helps you solve problems and take action?

Most of the Western philosophical tradition treats philosophy as, in the words of Richard Rorty, a “mirror of nature”—a system dedicated to reflecting the world as it is. But language makes an imperfect mirror, and attempts to map reality through it can lead to fuzzy thinking. John Dewey helped found the tradition of American pragmatism, which maintains that philosophy is simply a tool to solve practical problems—one whose answers are good or bad insofar as they’re useful, not insofar as they mirror the world.

A refreshing absence of theory

There’s a lot to like about pragmatism. Most of today’s philosophy privileges theory: postmodern readings of classic texts, for example, use it to draw out arguments that the authors never intended to make. (Plato wrote the Phaedrus about love and rhetoric; Derrida, the postmodern godfather, read it about “play,” “trace,” and “différance.”) But Dewey’s pragmatism leaves no room for theory—all that matters is inquiry and, based on its results, the decision whether a given hypothesis is “satisfactory” or “unsatisfactory.” Objective and results-oriented, pragmatism amounts to a wholesale alternative to postmodernism—one that predates it by more than 50 years.

But what about absolute truth?

Though pragmatism departs from postmodernism in its rejection of theory, it parallels it in one extremely interesting area: its treatment of absolute truth. You’ll notice that Dewey is concerned with satisfactory and unsatisfactory outcomes, not right and wrong ones. Bertrand Russell draws out the distinction:

“Truth, as conceived by most professional philosophers, is static and final, perfect and eternal; in religious terminology, it may be identified with God’s thoughts, and with those thoughts which, as rational beings, we share with God. . . . [But] Dewey makes inquiry the essence of logic, not truth or knowledge. . . . Dewey, like everyone else, divides beliefs into two classes, of which one is good and the other bad. He holds, however, that a belief may be good at one time and bad at another . . . . Thus a belief about some event in the past is to be classified as ‘good’ or ‘bad,’ not according to whether the event took place, but according to the future effects of the belief.”

What, then, to make of pragmatism—so clear-headed in its lack of theoretical pretense, yet so dismissive of absolute truth?

Russell continues:

“Dewey’s divergence from what has hitherto been regarded as common sense is his refusal to admit ‘facts’ into his metaphysic, in the sense in which ‘facts’ are stubborn and cannot be manipulated. In this it may be that common sense is changing, and that his view will not seem contrary to what common sense is becoming. . . . It has seemed to me that [Dewey’s] belief in human power [as arbiter of truth], and the unwillingness to admit ‘stubborn facts,’ were connected with the hopefulness engendered by machine production and the scientific manipulation of our physical environment.”

That is, pragmatism is, in its emphasis on the human, uniquely of our time. Russell argued the point in 1945, and his conclusions continue to ring true. That makes understanding pragmatism singularly important.

Know the culture: get Dewey’s select works for 80%+ off

You’re a serious thinker. You’re interested in how the culture handles objective truth—and why. And for just a few more days, you can a great deal on an outstanding entry point into the cultural conversation: the 11-volume Select Works of John Dewey, on Community Pricing for 89% off. Because these are Logos books, they represent the most useful editions of Dewey’s works—ever—and because they’re on Community Pricing, they’re the best deal on Dewey you’ll ever see.

This collection won’t be on Community Pricing for long. Bid on the Select Works of John Dewey for 89% off!

Then keep exploring philosophy as a window into culture: browse the new Noet libraries at Noet.com/Products.
 
 
Or keep reading—what does math have to do with culture?

Last Chance! Don’t Miss Your Introductory Savings on Noet Bundles

Blog_Header_LastChance

A few weeks ago, we started shipping Noet bundles, and we marked the occasion with some very special limited-time savings. Now we’re down to just three days—after Monday, January 27, Noet’s introductory discounts disappear forever!

This is your last chance to get introductory savings on a Logos-powered study library in philosophy, literature, or the classics. You don’t want to miss out—browse the Noet libraries right now.

When you add a Noet bundle, you get:

1. A complete library of key texts

noet-classical-foundations-bundle Whatever your interests, you’ll find a Noet bundle that gives you your discipline’s core works.

  • If you’re interested in philosophy and apologetics, the Ancient and Modern Philosophy Bundles give you the works of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Spinoza, Hume, and others.
  • If you’re interested in the New Testament, the Biblical Greek Bundle gives you Nestle-Aland’s Greek NT, 27th ed., plus LSJ, Porter’s Idioms of the Greek New Testament, and much more.
  • If you’re interested in ancient languages, the Biblical Greek, Classical Greek, and Classical Latin Bundles give you important primary texts and valuable study resources.
  • If you’re an all-around exegete, you’ll find a complete library of classical context in Noet’s Classical Foundations Bundle.

The great thing is that these libraries are carefully curated to give you the texts you’ll need. You won’t waste time on the legwork of rounding up hard-to-find editions—just pick up the Noet bundle that fits your study.

2. Logos-powered study features

noet-ancient-philosophy-bundleNoet books aren’t just important—they’re smart. With Noet’s free mobile app, you can study your new library using powerful research tools:

  • Run precise cross-library searches.
  • Set a primary source to scroll in sync with its commentary or translation.
  • See Greek and Latin gloss and morphology with a tap.
  • Remember what you learn with highlights and searchable notes that sync across all your devices.

Don’t have the mobile app yet? You can get it absolutely free!

So, let’s pause: you’re getting essential texts, powerful study tools, a terrific value, and additional limited-time savings.

Why haven’t you already picked up a Noet bundle?

“Noet is expensive”

noet-harvard-fiction-collectionClearly, the Noet editions are much more valuable than paper textbooks—they give you all the books you need, they help you learn more, faster, and they help you remember what you learn. The cool thing is that they’re a better value, too. If you’re a student, you’re probably paying hundreds of dollars for a single semester’s worth of books. With Noet, you can take that book budget and get entire discipline-specific libraries.

Plus, not only do Noet bundles give you the most important books, in carefully curated libraries, connected by smart study features, all for less than what you’re already paying for paper textbooks—for just three more days, introductory savings make them an even better deal.

Take advantage of your introductory savings: pick out your favorite Noet bundle right now.

(P.S. Don’t want to spend your book budget all at once? Spread out the costs with an interest-free payment plan!)

“I’m interested in the Bible, not the classics”

noet-biblical-greek-bundleYou appreciate rigorous study and nuanced interpretation, but you’d rather devote all your attention to Scripture. Why, then, read the classics?

Well, intellectual history and the history of Christian theology aren’t distinct disciplines—they’re a conversation, and they have been ever since Paul started using Greco-Roman rhetorical strategies to drive his points home.

In the West, the Bible is the ultimate classic, and Christian theology is woven into our literary and philosophical canon. When you study the classics, you aren’t turning your back on the Bible—you’re joining the conversation it’s been part of for millennia.

Engage the culture: pick out a Noet bundle while you can still get your introductory savings.

“Noet just doesn’t sound that interesting”

noet-harvard-classics-collectionA confession: I find some philosophy boring. I find certain philosophers’ prose intolerably dense. There are writers I’ve been trying to like for years who, deep down, I know I’ll never like. But none of that matters, because I’ve found the classical authors I love. You will, too, and then you’ll hear their ideas echo through everything else you read, just like you hear the Bible in the pages of Dostoyevsky.

But you don’t need me to describe what it’s like to get immersed in a beautiful, fascinating book. You’ve felt it.

And you know how hard it can be to find books like that, books that connect writer and reader across the barriers of time and language. With a Noet bundle, you’re getting the classics, preselected for quality by centuries of readers like you. What’s more, Noet’s study tools make deep, connected reading easier: they show you original-language nuance with a tap, and they connect you to related texts so you can focus on what you’re reading, not on indexes and tables of contents.

You don’t have to think all the classics are interesting to discover your next favorite writer. Browse all the Noet libraries at Noet.com/Products.

* * *

You have only three more days to take advantage of your introductory savings—on Monday, January 27, they’ll be gone forever.

Don’t miss out: add your favorite Noet bundles at Noet.com/Products!

Which Classical Library Is Right for You?

Noet is here! You can download the free mobile app right now, and for just a few more weeks, you can save on a selection of libraries spanning the classics, philosophy, ancient languages, and literature.

You’re interested in intellectual history and ancient context. You’re ready to start using Logos-powered study tools to learn more, faster. So, which Noet library is for you?

Let’s take a closer look at four standouts:

1. For the ambitious learner: the Harvard Classics Collection

noet-harvard-classics-collectionCharles William Eliot, the former Harvard president, selected the Harvard Classics’ 51 volumes to show that a five-foot shelf of books could prove “a good substitute for a liberal education.” Now Eliot’s famous five-foot shelf fits on your mobile device. You’ll get some of the best volumes across a wide variety of disciplines:

  • Poetry: Dante’s Divine Comedy, Milton’s complete poems, an overview of English-language poetry from Chaucer to Whitman, and more
  • Philosophy: Plato’s Phaedo and Apology, Berkeley’s Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonious, Hume’s Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, and more
  • Parable and allegory: Aesop’s Letters and Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress
  • Drama: Shakespeare’s Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Tempest
  • Economics: Adam Smith’s vastly influential Wealth of Nations
  • Physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, and medicine: writings by Faraday, Helmholtz, Kelvin, Newcomb, Hippocrates, Pasteur, and others

The  Harvard Fiction Collection, also available in Noet, builds on Eliot’s classical curriculum with works from Fielding, Dickens, Poe, Hugo, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, and others.

Start learning from some of the West’s greatest works: see everything you’ll get with the Harvard Classics Collection.

2. For the philosopher and classicist: the Ancient Philosophy Bundle

noet-ancient-philosophy-bundle“Every man,” said Coleridge, “is born an Aristotelian or a Platonist. . . . They are two classes of man, beside which it is next to impossible to conceive a third.” Adds Borges, “Across the latitudes and the epochs, the two immortal antagonists change their name and language: one is Parmenides, Spinoza, Kant, Francis Bradley; the other, Heraclitus, Aristotle, Locke, Hume, William James.” All through Western intellectual history run the arguments of Plato and Aristotle, as well as those of Plato’s famous teacher, Socrates; they are the context you need to study philosophy and the ancient world.

Noet’s Ancient Philosophy Bundle gives you Plato’s dialogues across five volumes, including the Phaedo—”There is nothing [like Socrates’ death in the Phaedo] in any tragedy, ancient or modern,” wrote the Rev. Benjamin Jowett—as well as the Republic (that famous discourse on justice and order), the Timaeus (which introduces the demiurge, or creator god, that the Gnostics found so fascinating), and many more. You’ll also get Aristotle’s vastly influential writings on logic, language, ethics, and rhetoric: On Interpretation, Physics, Metaphysics, Nicomachean Ethics, Rhetoric, and many more volumes.

Study the foundations of Western philosophy: see everything you’ll get with the Ancient Philosophy Bundle.

3. For the NT scholar: the Biblical Greek Bundle

noet-biblical-greek-bundleNoet’s Biblical Greek Bundle sets you up with resources to master the Greek of the New Testament. For one thing, you’ll get the authoritative critical text: Nestle-Aland’s Greek New Testament, 27th ed., the basis for almost every Bible translation carried out in the last hundred years. You’ll also get:

  • The famously comprehensive Liddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon
  • Two very accessible Greek grammars: David and Shackelford’s Beginner’s Grammar of the Greek NT and A. T. Roberston’s Short Grammar of the Greek NT
  • Lexical context that helps you learn: Stanley Porter’s Idioms of the Greek New Testament, 2nd ed., as well as the New Revised Standard Version.

All told, you’re getting an introduction to modern linguistics and Greek pronunciation, a highly regarded morphological concordance, lexical data for detailed analysis, and diverse contextual materials that set you up for wider understanding.

Study the NT in its original Greek: learn more about the Biblical Greek Bundle.

4. For the professor: the Classical Foundations Bundle

noet-classical-foundations-bundleNoet’s biggest library by far is the Classical Foundations Bundle. It gives you everything from the discipline-specific bundles, plus presentation media (quote slides and timelines) to save you lesson-prep time.

  • From the Ancient Philosophy Bundle, you get the works of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
  • From the Modern Philosophy Bundle, you get the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Berkeley, Hume, and others.
  • From the two Harvard bundles, you get Dante, Milton, Dostoyevsky, Augustine, and far more.
  • From the ancient-language bundles, you get the best resources for mastering Greek and Latin.
  • What’s more, you get the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection, which sets you up with key primary sources in both English translation and the original languages.

That’s a vast library: if these were print editions, you’d probably want a professional librarian to help you find, sequestered in some distant shelf, exactly what you’re looking for. With Noet, though, you can run powerful, precise searches across your entire library. When you find that rare primary source, you can set it to scroll together with its commentary or translation. And when you want to draw out original-language nuance, you can see the Greek or Latin gloss and morphology with a tap.

The Classical Foundations Bundle gives you the backbone of a good university library, and Noet’s smart searches and study features give you the world’s fastest research assistant.

Do better research with Noet’s biggest library: see everything you’ll get with the Classical Foundations Bundle.

* * *

Don’t have the new Noet app yet? Get it for free right now—and, if you like it, leave a review in your favorite app store!

Then start building the classical library that’s right for you: browse all the Noet bundles at Noet.com/Products.

Get Limited-Time Introductory Discounts on Noet Bundles!

Noet-bundles

Last week, we announced the free Noet mobile app. But the brand-new app isn’t the only exciting news—discipline-specific Noet libraries are shipping, too! Through January 27, you can take advantage of introductory savings on these powerful scholarly resources.

Students, professors, biblical scholars, book lovers—here’s what Noet bundles can do for you:

Students

If you’re studying the humanities, Noet gives you the academic advantage.

1. Noet bundles help you learn more, faster. You can search your whole library, see Greek and Latin definitions with a tap, save notes across all your devices, and more. You’ll spend less time flipping through tables of contents and scrolling through JSTOR, and more time on the real reading, writing, and learning.

Here’s just some of how Noet helps you out:



2. Noet bundles are a way better deal than textbooks. Right now, you’re probably paying hundreds of dollars for just one semester’s worth of books. With Noet, that same money gets you entire discipline-specific libraries. For just a fraction of what you already have to spend, add the Noet library that fits your study—a secret weapon that’ll help you for the rest of your academic career.

3. Noet bundles fit your major or emphasis. You’ll get the core texts in your field of study:

  • Philosophy major? Pick up the 18-volume Ancient Philosophy Bundle (Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle) and the 21-volume Modern Philosophy Bundle (Descartes, Spinoza, Hume, Kant, and others).
  • Classics or history major? Round out your library with the famous 51-volume Harvard Classics: Homer, Plato, Aurelius, Milton, Virgil, Shakespeare, Darwin, and much more.
  • English major? Add the 20-volume Harvard Fiction Collection—Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, Dickens, and more.
  • Ancient-language major? Choose from the 7-volume Classical Latin Bundle (Cicero, Seneca, Virgil, and more), the 6-volume Biblical Greek Bundle (Nestle-Aland 27th Greek NT, Idioms of the Greek NT, Liddell and Scott Greek–English Lexicon, and more), and the 8-volume Classical Greek Bundle (LSJ, the Iliad, and texts from Aristotle, Aeschlyus, Herodotus, and others)
  • Or go with the library that’ll give you a leg up in every humanities class you ever take: the immense Classical Foundations Bundle.

You’re getting the best texts, the best study tools, and the best deal, all in libraries tailored to your interests. Take advantage of limited-time savings on the Noet bundles that fit your study.

Professors

noet-classical-foundations-bundleYou’re an expert in your field, so you want tools that know it just as well as you do. Tools that help you plan lessons, make connections, build sound arguments, and draw out nuance. Tools that make you even better at your job.

With Noet, you can:

  • Run powerful cross-library searches to find the arguments and references you need to know.
  • Set a primary source to scroll in sync with its commentary or translation.
  • See Greek and Latin gloss and morphology with a tap.
  • Save lesson-prep time with Noet’s quote slides and timelines.
  • Replace those inscrutable handwritten marginalia with highlights and searchable notes that sync across all your devices.

Don’t want to use up your book budget? Make it easy with a payment plan: you can lock in your launch savings, start using your new library right away, and spread out the payments over up to 12 months. (First, you can even try out Noet for free: download the 1,114-volume Perseus Classics Collection and the free Noet app and get to know the platform.)

Pick out the bundles that match your teaching load, or grab the entire Classical Foundations Bundle before the price goes up!

Biblical scholars

noet-biblical-greek-bundleYour core scholarly interest isn’t philosophy, history, literature, or the classics. It’s Scripture. But even if the Classical Foundations Bundle isn’t for you, you can still benefit from Logos’ work in the humanities:

  1. Download the Noet mobile app—it’s a free, useful resource for grasping context.
  2. Grab “the best tool available for studying classical Greek background of the Bible”: the free Perseus Classics Collection.

Then, depending on your area of study, you might still conclude that a Noet bundle is right for you:

  • If you’re interested in the early church, the Ancient Philosophy Bundle will set you up to study the Greek intellectual climate leading up to early Christianity.
  • If you’re interested in apologetics, the Modern Philosophy Bundle will help you get to know some of modernity’s best-known arguments both for and against God.
  • If you’re interested in exegesis and ancient languages, Noet’s Greek and Latin bundles—especially the Biblical Greek Bundle—will help you understand the NT as it was originally written.

Don’t have Perseus and the new Noet app yet? Download them for free, and then check out all the Noet bundles.

Avid readers & lifelong learners

noet-harvard-fiction-collectionMaybe you don’t read to improve your grades or prepare a paper. Maybe you read for the sheer pleasure of connecting with like minds across the centuries. “If you spend enough time reading,” said David Foster Wallace, “You find certain writers who [make] your brain vibrate like a tuning fork . . . . And when that happens, reading those writers—not all of whom are modern—becomes a source of unbelievable joy.”

The whole point of Noet is to break down the barriers between you and the text:

  • Even if you don’t speak Greek or Latin, you’ll appreciate original-language nuance.
  • Even if you’re not a trained historian, you’ll follow lines of influence through history.
  • You’ll get a library preselected for quality, making it easier to find books you love.

Plus, if you’re anything like us, your plans for 2014 involve lots of learning. Noet’s a really great way to hack your education: the free app lets you take otherwise wasted time—your bus ride, the five- or ten-minute chunks you spend waiting in line—and turn it into personal growth. Noet bundles help you optimize your learning even further by equipping you with the very best books and study tools.

So, this year, invest in more and better reading and learning—get limited-time introductory savings on Noet bundles.

* * *

Now’s the very best time to build your library with Noet bundles—these special introductory discounts are never coming back.

Don’t miss this chance: pick up your favorite bundles at Noet.com/Products before January 27!

 
P.S. Professors: if you’re interested in getting your whole classroom on the cutting edge of digital research in the humanities, shoot us an email at sales@noet.com. Students: interested in ditching your paper textbooks and adopting the Noet platform full-time? Ask your advisor about moving the syllabus to Noet. Not a student, but know and care for someone who is? Tell them about the free Noet app!

Page 1 of 41234»