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Logos for the Mac: New Ship Date & Screenshots

Yesterday we announced a new release date for Logos Bible Software for the Mac: Spring 2006. We’re confident that the product will be shipping by the time June 21 rolls around, and we know it will be worth the wait.

Work is progressing steadily with no major obstacles, and the application looks great in the current build. Our artist-in-residence (who is a Mac devotee himself) turned out some very nice visuals for the interface so that Logos Bible Software would feel right at home on the Mac.

We get a lot of questions about how to participate in beta testing the Mac product. We’ll announce all public beta testing from the Logos for the Mac email list so sign up and stay tuned…

Disclaimer: Screenshots are from the prototype; the interface is subject to small or massive changes before we ship.

Product Guides on Logos.com

Thanks to one of our resident book experts (and book developer), Vincent Setterholm, we have launched a series of product guides on the Logos.com website. So far, these guides provide a basic introduction to the categories and sub-categories of books available for Logos Bible Software in the areas of Greek, Hebrew, and Other Ancient Languages. We hope to add additional categories soon.

I think Vincent does a great job of guiding the site visitor through the plethora of Logos tools and texts available for biblical language study.
For example, did you know that we now offer 9 Greek grammars and 8 Hebrew grammars that range from beginning to advanced, learning to reference? Or that we have a growing number of tools for studying Aramaic and Syriac?

These guides help fill a need I mentioned in an earlier post here on the Logos Blog: a need for “…objectively-written guides to books on Logos.com to help our users navigate the 5,000 titles now available for the system, much like a bookstore owner who offers suggestions based not on his own likes and dislikes but based on his extensive knowledge of what’s available.”
Thanks for leading us around a few aisles of the bookstore, Vincent!

Biblical Counseling Library

The “Logos Pre-Pub Machine” has been in high gear for some time now…this week alone we shipped two significant, heavyweight products for biblical language study—Comfort & Barrett’s The Text of the Earliest New Testament Greek Manuscripts and The Targums—while in the past 10 days we’ve posted three new prepubs to take their place.

One of these new prepubs breaks new ground for us, and that is the Biblical Counseling Library, posted to the prepub page just yesterday.
What’s novel about it is this: it’s a thematic collection bringing together 29 books from 20 authors and 10 publishers…all on subjects related to biblical counseling. We’ve done lots of author collections, publisher collections, and so on…but not really a large, thematic collection like this.

Some of the titles included are breakout bestsellers (e.g., I Kissed Dating Goodbye and Finishing Strong) while others are evergreen category standards (e.g., Competent to Counsel and Inside Out). Authors include Jay E. Adams, Larry Crabb, Elizabeth George, Steve Farrar, Steve Gallagher, Jerry Bridges and Francis Schaeffer. Publishers represented include Tyndale, Navpress, Zondervan, Multnomah, and Harvest House.

This collection is discounted 61% off the list prices of the 29 books included. Any pastor or layperson who counsels others—whether professionally or in an informal way—would do well to add them to their digital library.
You heard about it here first…the NewsWire email hasn’t yet been sent. More tools for ministry…let the Pre-Pub Machine roll on!

Preaching Through the Bible in a Year

Sometimes you hear a story that just sticks in your mind. Like the one about the pastor who preached through the entire Bible in a year, with his congregation reading along at a rate of 20+ chapters per week.

If you haven’t already heard this yarn, check it out. With National Bible Week coming up later this month, it’s a good time to think about what would happen if more churches followed this pastor’s lead. And without spoiling the story, I should mention that Logos Bible Software plays a central role in assisting Pastor Bolender with his massive undertaking.

Here’s an excerpt to whet your appetite…the full story is in the Leadership Journal archive.

In 2002, our church began an ambitious project: If the congregation would take up daily Bible reading again, I would teach scriptural surveys that covered the passages they were reading. By year’s end, the congregation had read Genesis to Revelation, and I had taught 250 messages on all 66 books. I had to preach five times a week to keep up with the church (they were devouring 20-30 chapters a week), but a simple plan and some well-organized software enabled us to do it.

See also:

ETS/SBL Sessions Relating to Logos, Part 3

Two of our own Logos staff are making additional presentations at the ETS/SBL meetings. The presentations listed in this third post are not Logos-related, per se, but we want to support Mike and Rick in what they’re doing “on the side”. :-)

Dr. Mike Heiser, Ph.D., is presenting two papers at ETS. They are both based on his dissertation and discuss the relationship between certain aspects of early Israelite theology, New Testament/Early Church theology, and contemporary controversies. One of Mike’s research interests is questions surrounding the divine council and monotheism in the Old Testament.

I mentioned Rick Brannan’s Logos-related ETS presentation in Part 1 of this series of posts, but he’s also presenting a paper on biblioblogging at SBL. Biblioblog denotes a blog devoted to discussions of the Bible. Rick started Ricoblog over a year ago and PastoralEpistles.com in February 2005. His presentation will relate his experiences in setting up and maintaining these blogs, and present ideas for how to overcome some biblioblogging obstacles.

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ETS/SBL Sessions Relating to Logos, Part 2

As noted in Part 1, a number of presentations and papers at ETS and SBL will touch on Logos Bible Software in some way.

Four SBL presentations relate to Logos (I covered ETS in Part 1, if you missed it).

On Monday morning (S21-15), check out Dr. Steven Cox’s paper on integrating technology such as Logos Bible Software into the classroom to enhance the teaching and research of biblical Greek.

That afternoon (S21-107), sit in on the Computer Assisted Research session as Dr. Al Lukaszewski discusses and shows his work on a syntactically tagged database he’s developing for Logos. Stick around for a presentation later in that same session by Matthew O’Donnell and Catherine Smith, who are working with the Louw-Nida lexicon to perform computational analysis of the Greek New Testament. O’Donnell is with OpenText.org, our partner in developing a syntactically annotated Greek NT.

Finally, on Tuesday head over to the “Linguistics and Biblical Hebrew” session where you’ll hear from Dr. A. Dean Forbes on how phrase marker analysis of the Hebrew Bible opens up new avenues of research. Logos is partnering with Dr. Francis I. Andersen and Dr. Forbes to make their tagged Hebrew text available so you can do this kind of work, too!

Full details for each session follow…

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Re-Caffeinated at Logos!

Logos programmer Bryan Albert fills the bean hopperThe espresso machine is back! After breaking down sometime in September (that month is nothing more than a hazy, coffeeless memory now) and spending weeks at the repair shop in Canada (don’t ask why we have to take it to Canada when it breaks)…it finally came back last week and is once again caffeinating the good people of Logos.

The first couple of times the machine needed service, we crated and shipped it up to Vancouver. But customs turned out to be a hassle. So now a guy (Caleb) who works in our shipping department has been designated the bearer of the machine. He loads it in his car and drives it north of the border…and back. You might envision four men carrying it on long poles with the tribes of Logos following in procession…but it’s not quite like that…yet.

But we do love our coffee. True story: when the espresso machine came back from the shop this time, the repair guys said that when they opened it up and looked at the counter (shotometer?) inside, they couldn’t believe what they saw. Apparently, the machine has already produced more than 20,000 cups of coffee. The repair guys said it was the most they had ever seen on one machine.

Here’s to the beautiful bean… :-)

Yummy latte

ETS/SBL Sessions Relating to Logos, Part 1

One of the most exciting events we attend every year is the national meeting of Evangelical Theological Society and Society of Biblical Literature held in mid-November, this year in greater Philadelphia, PA.

We’ll have a booth at each meeting where you can meet a number of Logos staff. It’s an exciting time for us to meet and hear from the academic crowd and show off new products and features that are in the works or recently shipped.

Beyond just stopping by the booth, this year you can also attend half a dozen or more sessions that relate to Logos Bible Software! Some of the sessions are presented by Logos staff, but most are presented by scholars who are using our software or developing new databases for Logos.

I’ll start with ETS, since it’s held first, then follow up with a post or two on SBL sessions (found here and here).

At ETS, you’ll want to hit the Thursday afternoon session on Bible software, moderated by Dr. Coakley, Moody Graduate School. At that session, the emphasis is on using software tools such as Logos to teach syntax and discourse-level analysis. The new tools and databases we’re producing open up new approaches to teaching (and learning!) the biblical languages. The focus can now move beyond the word level to consider textual units as a whole. Just as morphologically-tagged texts were an essential tool for yesterday’s seminarian, syntactically-tagged texts are the indispensible tool for the next generation of students.

At this session, you’ll hear from three Moody profs and our own Rick Brannan and Eli Evans. Details follow…

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Broadus on Sin

John A. Broadus

These posts are supposed to be Logos-related so I might be stretching it a bit with this one…

I recently bought a book by D. A. Carson called Becoming Conversant with the Emerging Church that I hoped would be an intelligent critique of the emerging church “not-a-movement.” I’m still not sure whether it is intelligent or anything else because my wife started reading it before I got a chance to pick it up.

But one paragraph she read aloud came to mind today…

Some leader, perhaps Mike Yaconelli, was quoted as saying that we don’t need to talk about sin anymore. People these days know all about their sin …it’s the message of grace that they need to hear.

Personally, I’m not ready to stop hearing about my sin because I don’t think I take it seriously enough. It doesn’t grieve me the way it ought, and I don’t hate it as passionately as I ought. All in all, I think our age takes sin very lightly compared with at least some ages past.

In fact, downplaying sin in preaching and hymnody is certainly not unique to any one movement or denomination; I would say it’s become a defining characteristic of whole swaths of Christendom. The point of this post is not to offer a critique of the emerging church movement but rather a counterpoint to our collective and individual willingness to get chummy with sin.
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The Lost Photo Shoot

The attentive reader of Bob’s Sept. 27 post will recall that he mentioned using the ECF volumes for a recent photo shoot.

We were shooting Bob for the Red Herring article and trying to come up with some creative images. The reporter said the more interesting the image, the more likely it would be used in the story.

As with many projects at Logos, this was a no-budget affair. Sean, the graphic designer and all-around art guy, brought in his digital SLR camera and we grabbed some lights from next door…

After getting out the ladder so Bob could climb up and stand atop the 15-foot wall, we abandoned the idea as impractical (not because it was dangerous but because the angles were all wrong). We considered going next door to the dusty, gutted-out building that is being prepared for us to inhabit soon, but that idea was discarded as being an irrelevant backdrop.

We like the aluminum sign that hangs in the reception area, and somebody suggested using some books as a prop. Next thing you know, we’re trotting back to one of the bookshelves to retrieve the Early Church Fathers volumes. Where else can you find a stack of uniformly bound books that reaches more than waist high?

Here are some shots of the shoot in progress…
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