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Why Wait until Christmas to Build Your Library? Save Big Now!

We recently made our large Christmas collections available year-round as Library Builder Collections.

Imagine if your local bookstore were to have a sale on over 2,000 books—offering them all for only $1.24 per title. By the end of the day the store’s shelves would be empty. But with Logos’ Library Builder deals, you get huge bargains that never go out of stock!

These collections are packed with the resources you need—at a price you can afford. Take a look!

The Basic Library Builder (125 vols.) contains commentaries, dictionaries, theologies, and other helpful resources. If you’re in the market for resources to build your library, but you have a tight budget to work with, the Basic Library Builder is the collection to get.

The Essential Library Builder (250 vols.)If you’re looking for a little more bang for your buck, then the Essential Library Builder is the collection for you. As with the Basic, this set contains even more important dictionaries, commentaries, and theologies to augment your library—bundled together at one low price.

The Intermediate Library Builder (500 vols.) gives you 500 books for $1.80 each including four volumes from the Pillar New Testament Commentary, three volumes from Black’s New Testament Commentary, five volumes from New American Commentary, and four volumes from the New International Greek Testament Commentary.

Note: These three collections don’t overlap with each other, so you could buy a couple of them without getting any duplicates. Even though the master collection is the best deal, all of these collections offer an amazing amount of content at amazing prices.

The Master Library Builder (2,010 vols.) the perfect collection for an expansive resource library! Adding this many titles at only $1.24 a piece is almost too good to be true. If you were to purchase the contents in this collection at their list prices, you would pay $61,127.94. With the Master Library Builder, you save over 95%! Check out the product page to see all the amazing resources which come with this collection.

These Library Builder Collections allow you to get the best resources at the best possible price. And remember, you can always use our interest-free payment plan to stretch your payments out for up to a year!

So add content (and value) to your library—check these collections out!

Did you pick up one of these collections during Christmas? Leave us a comment and tell us what you think.

Frederick W. Danker’s Legacy

Thursday, February 2 was a somber day for every student of New Testament Greek. Frederick W. Danker, arguably the world’s foremost Greek lexicographer, passed away at the age of 91.

For many, he will forever be known as the “D” in the acronym BDAG: Bauer, Danker, Arndt, and Gingrich. Published in 2000, and comprised of over 1,100 pages, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (known simply as BDAG) is the definitive dictionary for New Testament Greek.

While its predecessors (BAG, BAGD) were simply translations and adaptations of Bauer’s German dictionary into English, Professor Danker’s dictionary was, for all practical purposes, an entirely new work.

It’s said that for 10 years Professor Danker worked on BDAG 12 hours a day, 6 days a week. Because of Professor Danker’s investment of time and energy, we can study the word of God in the original Greek language, knowing that we have an authoritative and comprehensive Greek dictionary of the New Testament. May you rest in peace Professor Danker.

Along with BDAG, Professor Danker is also the author of a number of others books and articles, one of which is a commentary on 2 Corinthians in the Augsburg Commentary on the New Testament (15 vols.).

9 New Ways to Save with Community Pricing

Logos has recently moved some very important resources from Pre-Pub to Community Pricing. This is an incredible opportunity for Logos users!

Community Pricing is one of the most popular ways to grow your library at remarkably low prices. Check out the following resources that have just moved to Community Pricing:

  1. The Works of David Clarkson (3 vols.)
  2. Dictionary of the Targumim, the Talmud Babli and Yerushalmi, and the Midrashic Literature (2 vols.)
  3. The Sacred Books of the East (50 vols.)
  4. The Works of Adam Clarke (24 vols.)
  5. The Works of the Reverend John Fletcher (6 vols.)
  6. The Collected Writings of John Nelson Darby (47 vols.)
  7. The Works of Andrew Gray 
  8. Patrologia Cursus Completus, Series Graeca, Part 1 (vols. 1–18)
  9. Oxyrhynchus Papyri (vols. 1–15)

Each of these works lingered on Pre-Pub for over a year (some even longer!), but you have an opportunity to pick them up now at a fraction of the Pre-Pub price! So head over to the Community Pricing page and place your bid!

What’s the best deal you’ve found on Community Pricing? Leave us a comment and tell us about it!

The BECNT Upgrade Is Shipping Soon!

Over the years, Baker has published a number of must-have commentaries. Among these is the eight-volume Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (BECNT).

The scholars in this series are experts on the books they have commented on—Darrell Bock on Luke is a perfect example.

Logos is set to release the second installment of the BECNT series for Logos 4. The seven-volume BECNT upgrade includes first-rate exegetical commentaries from some of evangelicalism’s finest New Testament scholars. For only $199.95, you’ll get commentaries from the likes of Darrell Bock (Acts), Robert Stein (Mark), Frank Thielman (Ephesians), and Gene Green (Jude, 2 Peter). If you were to buy these seven volumes in print you would pay more than $300.

This Pre-Pub price is ending soon, and you do not want to miss out on this fantastic deal. Once we begin shipping the second installment of the BECNT, the price will go up—so order now. You will not be disappointed.

New on Pre-Pub: The Florida College Annual Lectures (1974-2011)

New to Pre-Pub is Florida College Annual Lectures (1974-2011). Established in 1946, Florida college is a small Christian College located just outside Tampa, Florida. Every spring, the college holds an annual lecture series on a variety of theological subjects.

With the Logos edition, you get 38 years of in-depth theological content. Each volume in the Florida College Annual Lectures contains lectures focused on a particular theme, doctrine, or book of the Bible, which makes these lectures valuable resources for specialized study.

So, pre-order your copy while the Florida College Annual Lectures (1974-2011) are still on Pre-Pub. At the low price of only $74.95, you cannot go wrong!

The Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament

Logos recently put the Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament (BHGNT) on Pre-Pub, and I can’t overemphasize how awesome and useful this series is!

You may come across a difficult grammatical construction or syntactical anomaly in the Greek text of the New Testament, and turn to a critical commentary like the ICC or NIGTC looking for help. While these commentaries will often answer your grammatical and syntactical questions, there are still times where you won’t find the information you’re looking for. This is where the BHGNT shines!

What makes the BHGNT so amazing is how it focuses primarily on matters of grammar, syntax, linguistics, and lexicography. That is to say, it is primarily a philological commentary. But that is not all! The BHGNT also includes cross-references to major commentaries, grammars, Louw and Nida, and BDAG—all easily accessible in Logos 4 with a simple click of your mouse! As a bonus, some of the later additions (i.e. Luke and 1 Peter) interact with the Discourse Grammar of the Greek New Testament, authored by our very own Steve Runge.

Here’s a real-life example of how helpful the BHGNT is. Let’s say that you’re translating Paul’s letter to the church in Ephesus for an intermediate Greek class. You need to identify the uses of participles, infinitives, and important noun cases. You are doing great, but then you hit a wall—you cannot for the life of you figure out in what sense the infinitive ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι in Eph 1:10 is being used. Instead of reading through pages of critical commentaries looking for a possible answer, the BHGNT cuts right to the chase and gives you:

ἀνακεφαλαιώσασθαι. Aor mid inf ἀνακεφαλαιόω (epexegetical to μυστήριον 1:9).

The BHGNT is concise and jam-packed with a wealth of valuable philological information, saving you time.

So, if you’ve been looking for a resource that can help you out of a philological jam, then the Baylor Handbook on the Greek New Testament for Logos is exactly what you need!

Your Bible Study Companion

How often have you wished you had a biblical scholar on speed dial, someone you could call twenty-four hours a day when you are stuck on a difficult passage in the Bible? The Eerdmans Companion to the Bible is perfect for moments like these, and for a limited time, you can get it on Pre-Pub for 33% off the retail price.

Since the Bible was written over a period of more than 1,000 years, we are bound to run into  language, cultural, and historical barriers. But how do we step over these obstacles and find the meaning of the text? Inside Eerdmans Companion we find the tools we need to become better readers, thinkers, and interpreters of the Bible.

The Logos edition of the Eerdmans Companion to the Bible opens both this resource and the Bible side-by-side, making study more effective. Logos has made Bible study fast and easy, and with the addition of the Eerdmans Companion to the Bible your study can go even deeper. So, if you want to lock in the low pre-pub price of $26.95, head over to Logos.com now and order the Eerdmans Companion to the Bible before the price goes up.

The Filología Neotestamentaria Journal Collection

Recently, I wrote about the importance of having access to theological journals in your Logos library. The Filología Neotestamentaria (31 vols.) is a terrific example. Published by the Department of Greek Science Antiquity and the Middle Ages at the University of Cordoba, this is one of the most important journals in print on the New Testament. Now, Logos is making it available for your personal library.

Filología Neotestamentaria is a journal specializing in Hellenistic Greek, the language of the New Testament and Septuagint. Each article concentrates on a Greek-related topic, such as textual criticism, semantics, grammar, lexicography, rhetorical criticism, and semiotics. Filología Neotestamentaria is a must for any serious student of Hellenistic Greek; and when you look at some of the gems it contains, it’s not difficult to see why:

  • “Some Dissenting Notes on R. Stein’s The Synoptic Problem and Markan ‘Errors’,” by David Alan Black
  • “Vague Verbs, Periphrastics, and Matthew 16:19,” by Stanley E. Porter
  • “The Pauline Love Command: Structure, Style, and Ethics in Romans 12:9–21,” by David Alan Black
  • “Studying Ancient Languages from a Modern Linguistic Perspective: Essential Terms and Terminology,” by Stanley E. Porter
  • “How Do Words Mean—If They Do?,” by Johannes P. Louw
  • “The Use of the Definitive Article before Names of People in the Greek Text of Acts with Particular Reference to Codex Bezae,” by Jenny Heimerdinger and Stephen Levinsohn
  • “Literary Artistry in the Epistle to the Hebrews,” by David Alan Black

Now is the time to jump on board and pre-order the Filología Neotestamentaria collection. At the pre-pub price of $99.95, this is a steal—considering that the price for just two volumes is over $100!

An Interview with Dr. William Varner

Dr. William Varner’s To Love God and to Love Others: A Devotional Commentary on James is now available on Pre-Pub. I had the honor of sitting down with Dr. Varner at this year’s Evangelical Theological Society’s meeting in San Francisco to ask him a few questions about his new commentary on James.

Logos: Thank you for taking the time to answer a few questions Dr. Varner. Could you tell our readers a little bit about yourself?

Dr. Varner: I was saved at the age of 17, did my undergraduate work at Bob Jones University, and then went on to receive my M.Div. and Th.M. (NT) at Biblical Seminary in PA. Along the way I also picked up an M.A. in Judaic studies at Dropsie College and an Ed.D. in theological education from Temple University. I teach at the Master’s College in Santa Clarita and I also pastor the Sojourners Fellowship at Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, CA.

Logos: How did this devotional commentary on James come to fruition?

Dr. Varner: Last winter I published a technical commentary on the Greek text of James. It was aimed at scholars and developed a discourse analysis perspective on the book. By the way, it is also available through Logos! The flock of three hundred folks that I pastor was mostly unable to benefit from the commentary due to its technical, linguistic nature. So I began posting on my blog some practical comments on James based on my research, but not expressing the ideas in technical language. I then edited those posts, added some new material, and also added a personal prayer after each section. Logos liked the idea and the rest is history.

Logos: What makes To Love God and to Love Others different from traditional commentaries on James?

Dr. Varner: Only that I try to work harder at applying the practical message of James even more than good traditional commentaries. Pastors and teachers can also utilize the comments since they are presented in outline “sermonic” form. Because James uses so much of the teaching of Jesus, it was easy to come up with the title, To Love God and Others, since Jesus uses such a “creed” to summarize the OT (Matt 22:37-39). James does the same, with a strong dose of our horizontal love to others. But he does not neglect our vertical love to God either. There is more theology in James than many realize. He is not just a moralist. His ethics are theologically grounded.

Logos: How can one incorporate your devotional commentary into their daily Bible study?

Dr. Varner: The reader can work through the sections of James one at a time, say six days a week, and finish the book in about five weeks. I have included the entire English text of James, so you can read a passage of 4-5 verses, and then read my devotional comments. Finally—and this is something that a commentary rarely does—I append a brief personal prayer at the end of each section where I try to formulate the truths in that passage into the petitions of the prayer. I try to follow the old three step approach: observe, interpret, apply.

Logos: Do you have any other writings on James forthcoming?

Dr. Varner: I am glad you asked. I am presently finishing work on another exegetical commentary on James, to be included in the series called the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary. It is about twice as long as the discourse commentary that I previously mentioned and probably 10 times longer than the devotional commentary. I might add that Logos is sponsoring the publication of this significant set of commentaries on the entire Bible. I think that mine will be the second New Testament volume to appear.

Logos: Thanks Dr. Varner for taking the time to answer some questions.

If you want to get To Love God and to Love Others: A Devotional Commentary at the amazing Pre-Pub price of $6.95 make sure you place your order soon.

A Case for Theological Journals

If you have spent any amount of time doing serious Bible study or research you have inevitably run into references to articles contained in theological journals. These journals are on the cutting edge of biblical scholarship, containing fresh research, insight into key theological topics, and exegesis of the Biblical text.

But too often when you want to take your studies further, you find that these journals are housed in some far-off Bible college or university. And if you wanted to order a subscription to a specific journal you’ll soon find that you may have to put off eating for a month–some of these journals can cost well over a hundred dollars for just four issues! But do not despair! With the Theological Journal Library, vol. 14 now on Pre-Pub, Logos has brought those distant libraries filled with theological journals right into the comfort of your own home.

The Need for Theological Journals

Where a Bible commentary may take up to 10 years or more to be published, journal articles tend to be published more quickly. Also, with commentaries there is often a set page limit that constrains the author to stick to the big picture while theological journals step in and go deeper into textual issues.

This freedom keeps theological journals on the cutting edge of scholarship. Often this scholarship is more specialized, focusing on issues of grammar, cultural background, or theology of a particular passage or passages of Scripture. Having access to theological journals in your Logos library is like bringing a research library into your personal place of study and allowing you to study the Bible in a more enriching manner.

Theological Journals in Logos 4

If you are a Logos user, then you know how incredible it is to have a software program that searches your entire library in a matter of seconds. In the same way you search the Bible for a particular word, phrase, or verse, you can also just as quickly search through your theological journals for any reference or verse. And when you click on a Scripture reference in your journal, Logos quickly navigates to that Bible verse. This speeds up your study and gives you more time to research—and who doesn’t want that?

Considering the amount of scholarship contained in theological journals and the speed and power of Logos 4, Theological Journal Library, vol. 14 is an invaluable addition to your library. And with the incredible Pre-Pub price of $49.95, now is the time to add it to your library and take your Bible study to an even deeper level.  And while you’re at it, check out some of these other journals that Logos has to offer!

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