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Win a Free Copy of the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary!

To mark the release of the newest addition to the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (44 vols.), we’re giving away a copy of the entire EEC!

This giveaway ends June 30, so enter soon—and often!
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John’s Epistles Now Available

We’re excited to announce the latest release in the EEC series, 1–3 John by Gary W. Derickson. Dr. Derickson serves as the ministry division chair at Corban University. He’s published articles on Matthew, John, and 1 John in a number of academic journals. With a robust introduction and a thorough treatment of John’s epistles, Dr. Derickson’s commentary will be an important resource for serious study of the Johannine Epistles.

If you already own the EEC, this volume has already been downloaded to your resources!

What Is the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary?

The Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (44 vols.) is the first major academic Bible commentary series published in many years. Like the Word Biblical Commentary, the EEC offers the best in evangelical scholarship. Logos has carefully selected authors who are specialists in their field of study, ensuring that each commentary offers critical and exegetical interaction with the Bible in its original languages and context.

The EEC is written from a distinctively evangelical perspective and each volume provides serious exegesis, interacting with primary sources as well as the most up-to-date secondary sources. Such interaction requires that contributors engage with the very best scholarship available. Our commitment to evangelical scholarship is spelled out clearly in the sections on “Biblical Theology” and “Application and Devotional Implications” at the end of each pericope.

Order Your Copy Today

When you place your order for the Evangelical Exegetical Commentary, you’ll immediately receive Philemon by Seth EhornEzra & Nehemiah by Israel Loken, and Gary W. Derickson’s brand-new commentary on 1–3 John. Future volumes of the EEC will be delivered as soon as they are available. So order your copy now, and don’t forget to take advantage of our interest-free payment plans!

And don’t forget to enter to win the EEC for free!
Enter Now!

Adolf Schlatter (1852-1938)

Adolf Schlatter in his study.

Do we know Jesus? If we no longer know him, we no longer know ourselves“—Do We Know Jesus? Daily Insights for the Mind and Soul (Kregel Academic, 2005).

As the world spiraled toward a second World War, Adolf Schlatter knew his time on earth was coming to a close. Schlatter had stood behind the lectern of some of Europe’s most prestigious universities, authored important scholarly monographs, and ministered to students and parishioners. But his final days were spent in prayer and agony for the German church, which he feared was being swallowed up by fascism. On the morning of May 19, 1938, at the age of 85, Adolf Schlatter entered into the eternal rest of his Savior, whom he treasured and proclaimed faithfully all his life.

Since his death in 1938, Schlatter’s contribution to biblical scholarship has remained relatively unknown to many English-speaking evangelicals. While the works of other important German scholars like Karl Barth—a student of Schlatter’s—have enjoyed a wider audience among English-language readers, Schlatter’s writings have remained largely untranslated. In the latter part of the 20th century, Schlatter’s contribution to New Testament theology and exegesis has experienced an awaking of sorts among American evangelicals—and this is a great thing for us all. Some of his most important works have since been translated into English and given a wider audience, bringing his contribution to New Testament studies into the foreground of mainline evangelicalism.

Faith in the New Testament by Adolf Schlatter: English and German

Logos has commissioned the first-ever English translation of Adolf Schlatter’s Der Glaube im Neuen Testament (Faith in the New Testament). We believe that good scholarship should be available to all, so we’ve placed Schlatter’s Faith in the New Testament on Pre-Pub. Once there’s enough interest, we will begin the translation process. So in honor of the 74th anniversary of Schlatter’s passing, why not pre-order a copy of Faith in the New Testament and help make Adolf Schlatter’s works more available than ever before!

Buried Treasures in the Sands of Egypt

B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt

In 1897, two archeologists stumbled upon the greatest cache of papyrus manuscripts ever discovered. B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt’s discovery of over two thousand manuscripts buried in a trash heap in the sands of Oxyrhynchus was a watershed event for New Testament and lexicography studies.

The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, as they’ve come to be known, date from as early as the first century CE all the way through the ninth century CE. They include literary works from Homer, Plato, and Sophocles, as well as other important works from antiquity. Also buried in the sands were some of the earliest manuscript witnesses to the New Testament writings. Among these discoveries were fragments of Matthew 1, Romans 1, and 1 John 4, parts of 1 Corinthians and Philippians, and a leaf from Revelation. These discoveries gave paleographers and lexicographers new manuscripts to analyze and compare with the thousands already at their disposal.

Why Is This Discovery Important for New Testament Studies?

Before the discovery of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, New Testament Greek was often called “Holy Ghost Greek.” This referred to the unusual style and syntax used by New Testament authors in their writings. Scholars like Adolf Deissmann and J. H. Moulton noted that the style of the New Testament was similar to that of personal letters, informal notes, and other non-literary documents found amongst the other Oxyrhynchus Papyri manuscripts. The discovery of the papyri put to rest the theory of a divinely inspired Greek language and allowed scholars to analyze the language of the New Testament alongside contemporary first-century writings.

Having the Oxyrhynchus Papyri (vols. 1–15) in your Logos library allows you to do serious textual studies first-hand. For anyone engaged in textual criticism, the Oxyrhynchus Papyri are an indispensable tool. Instead of doing research based on what other experts say, you can engage in critical research with the primary sources themselves! What’s more, included with the Greek inscriptions are discussions on particular examples, translations with line-by-line commentary and the reasoning behind textual reconstructions, and references to relevant parallels. So even if your Greek is not as good as it once may have been, the  Oxyrhynchus Papyri (vols. 1–15) is still a valuable reference tool for contextual study of the New Testament.

The Oxyrhynchus Papyri are on Community Pricing, and what makes Community Pricing so great is that it lets you set the price! The final price will be the lowest one with enough bids to cover production costs. To snag a copy of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri (vols. 1-15) at the lowest possible price, all you have to do is make sure your bid is at or above the final community bid.

Place your bid now, and tell everyone that might be interested in this resource to bid too. The more who bid, the quicker this goes into production at the lowest possible price!

Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament: A Must Have!

Logos has the first seven volumes of the Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament on Pre-Pub now for only $119.95!

I cannot say enough about this essential set of New Testament commentaries. The Paideia series features the latest in New Testament scholarship, while paying attention to the narrative and rhetorical strategies of the biblical authors. And unlike most critical commentaries, the Paideia New Testament series doesn’t focus on long, technical discussions about the origin of the New Testament; rather, it comments on the final canonical text as it is. This frees the commentator to do what a commentator does: comment on the text.

You’ll especially enjoy how these commentaries highlight important cultural practices, and compare the New Testament with other contemporary Greco-Roman documents.

Not convinced? Here’s what these scholars have to say:

“Most commentaries rewrite earlier commentaries. The better ones, to the contrary, often go their own way. Talbert’s work happily is of the latter type. It regularly offers fresh readings and new comparative materials, especially from Greco-Roman sources. This is not a tired rehashing but a welcome contribution.”—Dale C. Allison Jr., Errett M. Grable professor of New Testament exegesis and early Christianity, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary

“Beavis brings to this commentary ample familiarity with the text of Mark and with ancient literature more broadly. Balanced in judgment and offering numerous astute observations, this work should prove highly useful, especially to serious readers seeking a reliable introduction and companion for their study of Mark’s account of Jesus’ ministry.”—Larry W. Hurtado, Professor of New Testament language, literature, and theology, New College, University of Edinburgh

“This marvelous commentary is packed with substantive information and fresh insights. Brant draws on current literary approaches and an array of useful sources from antiquity to illumine John’s Gospel. She likewise makes the complexities of the Greek text intelligible for English readers. . . . As with other volumes in the Paideia series, this one is masterfully designed to provide optimum access for readers.”—Craig S. Keener, professor of New Testament, Palmer Seminary

“With a firm grasp on the theological, ecclesial, historical, social, and literary issues, James W. Thompson has produced a commentary on Hebrews that is clear, compelling, and helpful. In Thompson’s hands, this often difficult biblical book breaks open with new power and meaning.”—Thomas G. Long, Bandy professor of preaching, Candler School of Theology, Emory University

If you’re looking for a commentary series that’s stimulating, informative, and easy to read, the Paideia Commentaries on the New Testament is the set you need to have! Pre-order it now!

Adolf Schlatter’s “Faith in the New Testament” To Be Translated!

In a never-ending quest to provide the best in biblical scholarship, Logos announces a new project to translate Adolf Schlatter’s 1885 masterpiece Der Glaube im Neuen Testament (Faith in the New Testament) into English.

Schlatter uses Old Testament, Rabbinic, and primary source documents to communicate the early church’s view of both faith and belief. Spanning twelve chapters and totaling nearly six-hundred pages, Faith in the New Testament is a philological tour de force.

Who Is Adolf Schlatter?

Adolf Schlatter was a brilliant New Testament scholar and theologian. Educated at Tübingen University and the University of Basel, Schlatter was a prolific author and professor for more than twenty years. He authored hundreds of written works, including influential monographs on topics relating to the study of the New Testament, biblical history, New Testament Judaism, dogmatics, and a number of critical commentaries. He was frequently asked to speak at conferences and fill the pulpit of local churches.

Take It from the Experts

“Adolf Schlatter . . . was theologically the most important figure in the faculty of Protestant Theology at Tübingen in the first third of the century.”—Peter Stuhlmacher, professor of New Testament Emeritus, Eberhard Karls Universität, Tübingen

“Schlatter’s writings hold rich potential for summoning serious biblical scholarship back to its classic sources, methods, and aims.”—Robert Yarbrough, professor of New Testament, Covenant Theological Seminary

“Because of his immense, unbelievable learning and his theological insights into the heart of the New Testament message . . . [w]e can learn a lot from him today, when the theological climate is changing, because he did not go trodden ways and always give new insights into the biblical texts, which many have forgotten.”—Martin Hengel, one time Emeritus Professor of New Testament and Early Judaism, Tübingen

Pre-Order Your Copy Now!

We are placing Adolf Schlatter’s Faith in the New Testament on Pre-Pub for only $39.95! This is an unbelievable price for an important contribution to New Testament studies.

Once we have enough to cover the cost for translation and production, the work begins. Order your copy today!

Students Save with the Logos Academic Discount Program

Seminary and college are exciting experiences, from getting your acceptance letter to walking across the stage for your diploma. That’s terrific, but this experience is often as expensive as it is exciting. That’s why we started the Logos Academic Discount Program.

Special Discounts for Students

The Logos Academic Discount Program gives students and faculty access to thousands of resources at reduced prices. This gives students (and faculty) the freedom to pursue academic excellence with Logos’ advanced tools without worrying about the price tag.

How Do I Qualify?

Qualifying for the program is easy. You must be a student currently taking at least three credits or a full-time faculty or staff member at a Bible college, seminary, university, or a similar institution. Once your application is approved, you’ll have access to special savings through the Logos Academic Discount Program.

Spread the Word

Do you know someone who is eligible for the academic discount? Send them an email, a text, or a phone call and tell them to check it out! Here are some other ways you can help get the word out:

fb1.pngFacebook: Post this blog article to your wall by leaving a Facebook comment below, post a link to http://www.logos.com/academic/program, or post the video to your wall!

tw1.pngTwitter: Post a tweet with a link to http://www.logos.com/academic/program. Not sure what to tweet? You can tweet this!

bl1.pngBlog: If you have a blog, you can write a post letting your readers know about Logos’ academic scholarships.

 

So all you students and professors, should apply today! We look forward to partnering with you.

Save Big When You Register Now for Pastorum Live!

Logos hosts Pastorum Live, June 5–6, in Chicago, IL.  This is no ordinary conference. Pastorum features 21 evangelical scholars known for publishing academic commentaries, monographs, and Biblical language grammars.

This conference is like Disneyland for me, a seminary student and scholar-in-training. It would be impossible to do justice to each of the speakers and their topics here; therefore, let me highlight a few lectures that I am excited about.

Craig Keener: “Across Cultures, Across Centuries”

Professor of New Testament at Asbury Theological Seminary, Craig Keener is the author of The Historical Jesus of the Gospels, Miracles: The Credibility of the New Testament Accounts, and commentaries on the Gospel of Matthew, the Gospel of John, Romans, 1–2 Corinthians, and Revelation. More than any other scholar I have read, Dr. Keener illuminates the culture and text of the New Testament with his encyclopedic grasp of first-century Greco-Roman writings. I am excited to hear what he has to share with Pastorum attendees!

Nicholas Perrin: “Jesus, the Kingdom, and the Church”

Nicholas Perrin is the Franklin S. Dyrness professor of biblical studies at Wheaton. Dr. Perrin is an expert on the apocryphal Gospel of Thomas, having written a both a dissertation and a more popular work on the subject. Dr. Perrin’s latest book is entitled Jesus the Temple. I am looking forward to Dr. Perrin’s lecture, “Jesus, the Kingdom, and the Church.”

Mark Strauss: “Use and Abuse of Biblical Languages in Teaching and Preaching”

Mark Strauss is the professor of New Testament at Bethel Seminary. He is the author of Four Portraits, One Jesus and The Davidic Messiah in Luke-Acts: The Promise and Its Fulfillment in Lukan Christology. Dr. Strauss has been heavily involved with the NIV, serving as the vice chair of the Committee for Bible Translations as well as associate editor for the NIV Study Bible. With over 20 years of teaching experience, Dr. Strauss is more than capable of lecturing on the best practices for using Greek and Hebrew from the pulpit and lectern.

This is just a taste of what you can expect at Pastorum. If you look at the list of Pastorum Live speakers, you’ll see a hand-picked and diverse collection of experts who will help boost your understanding of the Bible from beginning to end.

Logos is now offering special discounts for Pastorum Live! Registration costs range from $99–149, with special rates for students, faculty, and church staff. So register for Pastorum Live today!


Now on Pre-Pub: Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

The Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (ZECNT) is making a name for itself among scholars and pastors.

With five volumes already in print, the ZECNT is packed with fresh insight and critical New Testament engagement. It stands out among exegetical commentaries by engaging necessary scholarly literature without being bogged down with technical jargon and esoteric excursions.

Each of the authors in the ZECNT writes specifically for the scholar or pastor engaged in church life and ministry. This series is for those who wish to know what the text means and how it applies to the modern reader.

Recently, Logos added two new volumes of the ZECNT to Pre-Pub: Clinton Arnold on Ephesians and Thomas Schreiner on Galatians. These authors are well-known New Testament scholars and have written extensively in the areas of Pauline theology.

Galatians

With a major commentary on Romans in the Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament, Thomas Schreiner has established himself as one of evangelicalism’s premier Pauline scholars. As with Romans, Galatians is one of the most important New Testament writings dealing with justification and works. Schreiner works carefully through Galatians, slowing down at points of controversy and confusion to illuminate the text. Schreiner’s commentary on Galatians should be on the shelf of every pastor, alongside Longenecker, Bruce, and Dunn.

Ephesians

Clinton Arnold is no stranger to Ephesians, having written the Ephesians commentary for the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary series. He is also the author of a number of journal articles that explore central topics in Ephesians. His contribution to the ZECNT contains a detailed introduction to Ephesians, discussing both its theology and historical context. This would be a great addition to your Ephesians collection, ranking among O’Brien, Best, and Lincoln as one of the best critical commentaries on Ephesians.

Once the ZECNT update ships the price will go up. Pick up the Zondervan Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament today!

At Long Last! Ceslas Spicq’s “The Epistle to the Hebrews” Will Be Translated

These are exciting times for Bible students, especially those who have studied the Epistle to the Hebrews. Logos is creating the first English translation of Ceslas Spicq’s two-volume commentary on Hebrews.

Originally published in French as L’ Épître aux Hébreux, Spicq’s commentary contains a wealth of citations and interaction with both primary sources as well as key commentators on Hebrews. But unless you read French (and own one of the rare copies), this commentary can’t help you. Now, however, you can pre-order your own copy—in English!

Who is Ceslas Spicq?

You’ve never heard of Ceslas Spicq (1901–1992)? That’s understandable, as most of his writings have not been translated into English. Spicq was a theology professor at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland. He was also connected with the acclaimed École Biblique in Jerusalem. He authored a number of important commentaries, monographs, and a three-volume lexicon, Lexique théologique du Nouveau Testament, which was subsequently translated into English as the Theological Lexicon of the New Testament.

Why is this project important?

Spicq’s work is heavily referenced in almost every major commentary on Hebrews published after his!

The following chart highlights seven major commentaries and the number of times Spicq is referenced:

P. E. Hughes 152
F. F. Bruce (NICNT) 57
Harold Attridge (Hermeneia) 307
Craig Koester (AYBC) 269
Paul Ellingworth (NIGTC) 402
George Guthire (NIVAC) 32
Peter O’Brien (PNTC) 102
Total 1321

As you can see, scholarly interaction with Spicq is quite high. This chart doesn’t take into consideration the hundreds of times L’ Épître aux Hébreux has been mentioned in journal articles, monographs, and essays since Spicq’s commentary was published.

One of the more controversial sections features Spicq’s understanding of the relationship between Philo and the Hebrews author. In a section entitled “Le Philonisme de L’Épitre aux Hébreux (The Philonism of the Epistle to the Hebrews)”, Spicq spends 52 pages analyzing the vocabulary of Hebrews and the writings of Philo, paronomasia and metaphors they share, and an exegesis of select texts. While most modern scholars have put this thesis to rest; Ellingworth rightly notes, “it is not necessary . . . to reject as worthless or insignificant the linguistic and other evidence accumulated by Spicq” (Hebrews, 47).

Among Spicq’s greatest contributions are his detailed studies on the language and literary characteristics of Hebrews. This includes 27 pages of lexical and literary analysis. Spicq analyzes not only individual words, but also phrases unique to Hebrews.

Take it from the experts!

Still unsure about Ceslas Spicq? Here’s what leading scholars say about how important Ceslas Spicq’s commentary on Hebrews is:

“[Spicq’s] work on the Epistle to the Hebrews is a monument of dedicated piety and erudition.”—Philip E. Hughes, author of A Commentary on the Epistle to the Hebrews.

“Spicq’s commentary represented a major advance in the study of Hebrews. Exegetically thorough and theologically reflective, Spicq’s work influenced scholarly work on Hebrews in many languages for several decades. It remains an important resource for those who wish to mine the treasures of Hebrews.”—David Peterson, senior research fellow and lecturer in New Testament, Moore College

“I am delighted that someone is taking time to translate this classic work, which nearly all scholars who work in Hebrews references. Thank you for taking the time to provide an English translation for subsequent students to use in their study of the book.”—Herbert Bateman, professor of New Testament, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary

Who will translate?

Once we have enough orders, we will confirm and announce who will be working on the translation.

Pre-order your copy now!

We are placing Spicq on Pre-Pub for only $39.95! That’s an almost unbelievable price, considering that the two-volume French edition is virtually impossible to find. I was fortunate to get a copy of the first volume, and it cost twice as much as both volumes on Pre-Pub.

Once we have enough to cover the cost for translation and production, the work begins. Order your copy today!

Improve Your Biblical Language Studies

Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 vols.)Logos has always strived to offer the best in original language texts and tools, and the Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 vols.) is no exception. This collection contains 19 volumes of technical reference material from notable philologists, lexicographers, and grammarians from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This time period represents a golden age for the study of biblical languages, and the Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions (19 vols.) contains many of these important works.

Some of these titles include Westcott and Hort’s Introduction to the New Testament in the Original Greek, Thackeray’s Grammar of the Old Testament in Greek: According to the Septuagint, Swete’s Introduction to the Old Testament in Greek, and Smyth’s A Greek Grammar for Colleges.

With the Logos edition, you get all 19 volumes for the incredible price of $249.95; that is a saving of almost 70%! If you want to broaden your understanding of biblical languages and learn from some of the most gifted scholars, then grab Biblical Languages: Reference Grammars and Introductions while it’s still on Pre-Pub.

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