Get N. T. Wright’s Paul and the Faithfulness of God on Pre-Pub!

paul-and-the-faithfulness-of-godFor more than a decade, N. T. Wright has been considered one of the leading experts on the life and theology of the apostle Paul. His highly anticipated Paul and the Faithfulness of God—widely regarded as his magnum opus—comes out next month, and you can pre-order it now for $40 off.

Trained at Oxford under the late George Caird, Wright has held teaching posts at some of the world’s leading universities. Not only is Professor Wright a New Testament scholar; he’s also deeply involved in the life of the church. From 2003 to 2010, Wright served as the bishop of Durham, considered the third-highest rank in the Anglican Church. In 2010, Wright left the pulpit and returned to the lectern to take up the position of research professor of New Testament and early Christianity at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland.

With Paul and the Faithfulness of God, Wright continues his study of Christian Origins and the Question of God. A number of Wright’s earlier books touched on Paul and his theology—Paul: Fresh Perspectives, Justification: God’s Plan and Paul’s Vision, commentaries on the Pauline letters in the New Testament for Everyone Series, a major commentary on Romans in the New Interpreter’s Bible, and numerous journal articles. Paul and the Faithfulness of God is considered by most to be Wright’s essential work on Paul—the culmination of a lifetime of study and reflection on the church’s most important theologian and missionary.

If you’re looking to start a serious study on the theology of Paul, you should pre-order Paul and the Faithfulness of God. Not only will you get arguably the most important study on Paul since E. .P. Sander’s watershed Paul and Palestinian Judaism—you’ll also get a gem of a book: Pauline Perspectives: Essays on Paul 1978–2013, 33 essays on Pauline theology that previously appeared in various journals.

Right now, you can pre-order both of these important works for just $99.95. Paul and the Faithfulness of God will be this generation’s most important work on Pauline theology—don’t miss your chance to own it at the Pre-Pub price!

Get 40%+ off F. F. Bruce’s Commentary on Ephesians and Colossians

In both the classroom and the pulpit, Frederick Fyvie Bruce stands out as one of the most recognized voices among mid- to late-twentieth-century evangelical scholars.

Born in Elgin, Scotland, on October 12, 1910, F. F. Bruce—as he is more commonly known—was educated at Aberdeen, Cambridge, Vienna, and Manchester University, where he excelled in Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. Bruce held teaching posts at some of Europe’s most prominent universities, most notably as the Rylands Chair of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at Manchester University. He was a member of a number of prestigious societies, among them the Society for Old Testament Study and the Society for New Testament Study. Bruce was instrumental in the establishment of Cambridge’s Tyndale House, a library for postgraduate students engaged in biblical research.

Bruce was a prodigious author, and it’s in his numerous works that we find his enduring legacy. He wrote on a variety of subjects, including early Bible translations, Greco-Roman history, and the Old and New Testaments. Some of his better-known titles include The Canon of ScripturePaul: Apostle of the Free SpiritThe Epistle to the Galatians (NIGTC), and three volumes in the NICNT: ActsColossians, Philemon and Ephesians, and Hebrews. Bruce’s writings spring from a deep knowledge of apostolic Christianity and the Greco-Roman world it rose from. But he communicated in a way that was easily accessible, making the world of Jesus and the early church come alive.

You can get The Epistles to the Ephesians and the Colossians for only $24.95 with coupon code BRUCE13 through October 15—that’s more than 40% off.

Get yours now!

An Interview with Dr. Craig Blomberg

I recently had an opportunity to talk with Dr. Craig Blomberg, distinguished professor of New Testament at Denver Seminary. Bloomberg is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of 14 books and more than 80 articles in journals or multiauthor works. Many of his writings examine the historical reliability of the Scriptures, and he has also covered such diverse issues as wealth and poverty, hermeneutics, and women in ministry.

Thanks for taking the time to talk with us, Dr. Blomberg. Can you briefly share a little about where you were educated and where you currently teach?

You are most welcome. Thanks for the invitation. I grew up in Rock Island, Illinois, part of the Quad Cities, right on the Mississippi River across from Davenport, Iowa. I went to a Division III Lutheran liberal arts college in my hometown, Augustana College. After teaching a year of high-school math on Chicago’s North Shore, I attended Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois, where I met my wife, Fran. We were married in the summer of 1979, and we left shortly after that for my PhD studies in Scotland at the University of Aberdeen, which is where I became a Baptist.

My first job teaching New Testament studies and Greek was at Palm Beach Atlantic College (now University) in West Palm Beach, Florida, for three years. Then we had an opportunity to live and work in Cambridge, England, for a year, thanks to an invitation and a grant from the British wing of Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship. There I researched and wrote my first book, The Historical Reliability of the Gospels, and finished (radically) revising my dissertation, which turned into my second book, Interpreting the Parables. We moved to the Denver area in the fall of 1986, where I have taught at Denver Seminary ever since.

The first edition of Jesus and the Gospels was published in 1997. With this second edition, what were some of areas you felt needed to be updated? Also, has your overall understanding of Jesus and the Gospels remained the same since you first published the book over 10 years ago?

The areas that were most updated explain a number of the critical methods that some use for studying the Gospels, especially literary and postmodern criticism, developments in the “quest for the historical Jesus,” claims and counterclaims about the significance of the Gnostic Gospels, and research on the historical reliability of John. Thanks to some devoted research assistants, especially Jonathan Waits (who is now a Baptist pastor in Virginia, and who sifted through a ton of secondary literature for me and identified the studies to which I needed to pay the most attention), the footnotes and bibliographies were very thoroughly revised and updated in every chapter.

I certainly didn’t have any “sea change” in my understanding of any significant topic, but I frequently found better ways of saying things, better support for my positions, and new research that enabled me to nuance my views here and there a little better. If anything, I learned how scholarship as a whole is recognizing more and more material, even in the Gospel of John, that can be accepted as historical, even without presupposing Christian faith. Unfortunately, this is not the scholarship to which the media pays nearly as much attention as it does to the novel and the eccentric.

Gospel scholars like Richard Burridge have argued that the Gospels are best understood as resembling Greco-Roman biography. Would you agree with Burridge—classifying the Gospels as biography—or do you find a better genre to place them in?

They very much are biographies, but some Greco-Roman biographies play somewhat fast and loose with history. So I would prefer to be more precise and call them historical biographies. Of course, we can’t think of either history or biography with contemporary expectations about comprehensiveness, complete chronological ordering, verbatim quotation, or dispassionate chronicle. But by the standards of the world in which they were written—which recounted episodes from people’s lives very selectively, sometimes ordering their material topically, paraphrasing others’ words in a world that had yet to invent quotation marks or feel any need for them, and assuming that the only parts of history that were worth retelling were those from which you could learn lessons—the Gospels would have been viewed as highly accurate.

In part one, you discuss the historical background for studying the Gospels. How does understanding Jesus’ historical context give us a better understanding of the message and theology of the Gospels?

The only way to avoid misunderstanding any writer from any time period is to understand the historical and cultural context in which that writer wrote. To understand fully what Jesus meant by “go the extra mile,” we need to know that Roman soldiers occupied Israel during the first century and could legally commandeer any civilian they came across to carry their equipment for them for up to a mile. But they couldn’t force them to carry it any further. Jesus tells his followers and would-be followers, however, to do so voluntarily, and the expression has made its way into English as proverbial for going “above and beyond the call of duty.” When Jesus is asked if he is the Messiah, one has to understand that Jews were looking for a military and/or political deliverer who would help them rid the land of the Romans. When Jesus seems reluctant to come straight out and say he is their Messiah, or when he tells people not to tell others that he is, it’s because he believes that spiritual liberation is more needed than physical liberation. He realizes that a straightforward identification with the kind of Messiah most of his kinfolk were looking for would lead to serious misunderstandings about his ministry. Countless additional examples could be given.

Since the publication of The Quest for the Historical Jesus, there has been tremendous speculation on the Jesus of history and the Christ of faith. How does your work help inform the layperson about the quest(s) for the Historical Jesus?

I devote about two-thirds of one chapter to quickly and simply surveying the three main quests (or three phases of the quest), the strengths and weaknesses of each, and where we are today. I highlight the main portraits of Jesus popular in today’s scholarly literature, talk a little about why there is such a diversity of portraits, and outline what criteria various scholars use to determine what they will accept as historical. Then, in the section of the book that proceeds sequentially through the life of Christ, I include a short section near the end of each main topic on the principal historical reasons we can consider this collection of teachings or activities something that Jesus really did say or do.

Besides Jesus and the Gospels, what other resources would you recommend to someone who wants to study Jesus and the Gospels more?

That’s an almost unanswerable question. I would have to know first what specific areas they were most interested in, and then how much background they already have. Are we talking about a high-school student from a non-Christian background, a young adult raised in a church that emphasized teaching the Bible and especially the life of Jesus in their Sunday School curriculum, a Christian-college graduate who majored in biblical studies, or a pastor with a doctorate? Because people have such diverse backgrounds, each of my chapters closes with recommendations for further study divided into introductory, intermediate, and advanced resources, and I would refer the interested reader to those highly selective bibliographies.

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The second edition of Jesus and the Gospels: An Introduction and Survey is 30% off right now. Get yours before it leaves Pre-Pub and the price goes up!

Strack and Billerbeck’s Works in English

Today’s guest post is from Dr. David Instone-Brewer, senior research fellow in rabbinics and the New Testament at Tyndale House in Cambridge. He is an expert on rabbinic literature and curator of the website Traditions of the Rabbis in the Era of the New Testament.

commentary-on-the-new-testament-from-the-talmud-and-midrashStrack-Billerbeck’s Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Midrash is a wonderful treasury of rabbinic parallels to the New Testament. These parallels are sometimes obvious, sometimes obscure, and almost always interesting.

This is a resource for preachers as well as scholars. Preachers and scholars who want to present a rounded picture of the New Testament Jewish world have everything they need in this collection. Although most of the material was written after the New Testament was finished, it represents the thinking and culture of the Pharisees, as well as Paul’s opponents. The second- and third-century rabbis were not the same as the Pharisees of the first century, but neither group was a monoculture, and the overlap is much larger than the differences.

Paul Billerbeck, the main author of this work, was a lifelong pastor and preacher who collected these parallels in order to enlighten his congregation. He was also an accomplished scholar, whose publications brought him to the attention of the distinguished Berlin professor Herman Strack. Strack encouraged Billerbeck to write a theology of the ancient rabbis, but Billerbeck was more interested in creating a collection of sources that would be useful for preachers and scholars. He arranged them in the form of a commentary, following the example of John Lightfoot two centuries previously.

Although Billerbeck, in his introductions, explains that he merely helped Strack, this wasn’t the case, since Billerbeck was the primary author of this work. However, Billerbeck needed Strack to give credence to his works. Billerbeck, born of Jewish parents, could never have found a publisher without Strack’s help, especially in the increasingly anti-semitic climate of Germany.

Of the commentaries included, the commentary on Matthew is by far the largest, since the other Gospels contain only the material that was not paralleled in Matthew. The epistles are dealt with much more briefly than the Gospels, partly because their background is often Roman, rather than Jewish, and because the rabbinic sources are sadly lacking in theological discussions. They are concerned far more with the minutiae of how to obey the Law in daily life.

Many of the rabbis were like Nicodemus—honestly trying to please God by following the Law. This is why they were so concerned to know how they should live. This collection opens up their world, and helps us to picture the people with whom Jesus spoke, and the rich soil from which Christianity grew.

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You can be a part of bringing this monumental work to the English-speaking world! Pre-order your copy of Strack and Billerbeck’s Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Midrash today!

Celebrate the Ministry of F. F. Bruce

In both the classroom and the pulpit, Frederick Fyvie Bruce stands out as perhaps the most recognized voice among mid- and late-twentieth-century evangelical scholars.

Born in Elgin, Scotland, on October 12, 1910, F. F. Bruce—as he is more commonly known—was educated at Aberdeen, Cambridge, Vienna, and Manchester University, where he excelled in Greek, Latin, and Hebrew. Bruce held teaching posts at some of Europe’s most prominent universities, most notably as the Rylands Chair of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis at Manchester University. He was a member of a number of prestigious societies, among them the Society for Old Testament Study and the Society for New Testament Study. Bruce was instrumental in the establishment of Cambridge’s Tyndale House, a research library for postgraduate students engaged in biblical research.

Bruce was a prodigious author, and it is in his numerous works that we find his enduring legacy. He wrote on a wide variety of subjects, including early Bible translations, Greco-Roman history, the Old Testament, and the New Testament. Some of his better-known titles include The Canon of ScripturePaul: Apostle of the Free SpiritThe Epistle to the Galatians (NIGTC), and three volumes in the NICNT: ActsColossians, Philemon, and Ephesians, and Hebrews. Bruce’s writings were born from a deep knowledge of apostolic Christianity. But he communicated this in a way that was easily accessible, making the world in which Jesus and the early church lived come alive.

This weekend, in celebration of F. F. Bruce’s birthday, we’re offering Paul: Apostle of the Free Spirit for only $29.95 with coupon code FFBruce12. Pick up a copy of Bruce’s seminal work on Paul—you won’t be disappointed.

Back to School Sale: Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics

Today’s post on Karl Barth is from Matthew Wilcoxen. Matt is a PhD student at Charles Sturt University, focusing on Barth and the concept of time. He is a graduate of Biola University and Talbot School of Theology.

The term classic is applied to a work with lasting influence—a singular exemplar of a new mode of thought, one that leads to widespread imitation and sharp critique. A classic of Christian theology must also, of course, be an attempt to say afresh the message of the Bible. As the dust settles on the life of Karl Barth, it becomes increasingly clear that his magnum opus, the Church Dogmatics, deserves a place on this top shelf of Christian intellectual history, where it sits rightfully alongside the works of Augustine, Aquinas, and Calvin.

Karl Barth the Professor

The son of a Reformed minister, Barth (1886–1968) was himself stimulated to study theology through a confirmation class he took as an adolescent. He went on to study at Bern, Berlin, Tübingen, and then Marburg, receiving a thorough initiation into the liberal Protestant theology regnant on the continent in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. During WWI, Barth was busy studying the Epistle to the Romans. This would lead to multiple editions of a landmark commentary. In the words of one contemporary, the important second edition published in 1922 was a “bomb that fell on the playground of the theologians.” This book was so revolutionary that it catapulted Barth to the top rungs of the German academy, landing him a professorship in Göttingen. From here he would go on to teach at Münster, Bonn, and—after being expelled from Germany by the Nazis—Basel, where he would spend the rest of his career and write the bulk of the nearly-9,000-page Church Dogmatics.

Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics

The Church Dogmatics unfolds the same insight as the commentary on Romans—that revelation, the sovereign act of God, occurs outside of and in spite of all human possibilities. Through the study of, in particular, Luther, Reformed Christology, and Anselm’s Proslogion, Barth found the tools at his disposal to build a theological system on the objective reality of God in the incarnate Christ. Thus “in Christ”—applied to both God and human beings—is the method and the content of the 13 part-volumes of the Church Dogmatics. So not only due to his contemporary influence, but because Barth refuses to take as given anything other than Immanuel, “God for us,” Barth’s theology is continually solidifying its status as a classic.

This method of building a theological system engages Barth in lengthy scriptural exegesis, engagement with all strands of Western Christian theology, and critical interactions with modern philosophy. And since Barth sees true human existence in Jesus Christ, ethics is never treated as ancillary to theological reflection; in the Church Dogmatics, themes like prayer, sanctification, and other issues central to Christian discipleship figure quite prominently. There is something here for everyone—the student, the preacher, or even the accomplished scholar.

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As part of our Back to School Sale, you can pick up a copy of Barth’s classic Church Dogmatics for just $379.95 (with coupon code B2SBarth). Check out Barth and all the other amazing deals we have on sale for our Back to School Sale.

An Interview with Joel B. Green, Editor of the NICNT

One of the best resources in Logos’ Back to School Sale is the New International Commentary on the New Testament (NICNT). Until now, you could only get the NICNT as part of the complete New International Commentary series. Now we’re thrilled to offer the NICNT at the incredible price of $679.95 (with code B2SNICNT)So thrilled, in fact, that we asked the NICNT’s editor—Dr. Joel B. Green of Fuller Seminary in Pasadena—if he would be so kind as to answer a few questions about the NICNT’s history and what goes into publishing a volume in this time-honored series.

How long has the NICNT been in existence?

The NICNT was begun in the late 1940s by an international team of scholars within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

What makes the NICNT such a popular New Testament Commentary?

Several reasons come to mind. First, although the commentaries are based on the Greek text, they don’t assume much familiarity with Greek among their readers. This makes for a scholarly yet widely accessible resource. Second, our commentaries are urged to comment on the biblical text itself, rather than provide a running dialogue with secondary literature. Of course, our commentators interact with other New Testament scholarship, but this critical engagement is carried out in the footnotes. Third, these commentaries are concerned with scholarly New Testament study in the service of the church. Our first audience isn’t the biblical studies academy, but pastors, students, and other church leaders. As a result, volumes in the NICNT put critically engaged, evangelical scholarship on display.

Commentary series have different guidelines that authors must abide by when writing a volume—word-count restrictions, confessional constraints, etc. Does the NICNT have any specific guidelines that your authors must work within?

Someone has referred to the current problem of “commentary bloat,” and the evidence is on our shelves, virtual or otherwise, with the presence of ever-larger and multivolume studies. There’s a place for that kind of exposition and scholarly interaction, but it doesn’t represent the aims of the NICNT. Most people don’t have the time to read 50–75 pages on a single pericope as they prepare for Sunday’s sermon or Thursday’s Bible study. As a result, we want single-volume commentaries of a manageable size. How this works out depends on the book in question and the challenges it presents. For example, when I was writing the NICNT on the Gospel of Luke, I needed to keep in mind that I could average no more than about 14 words of commentary for every word Luke wrote. Gordon Fee’s commentary on Philippians—well, he had considerably more space with which to work! Authors chosen for the NICNT have no confessional statements to sign, but are selected from within the larger evangelical family. F. F. Bruce, of course, was associated with the Open Brethren Church, while Gordon Fee is ordained in the Assemblies of God. I myself belong to the Wesleyan tradition and am ordained in The United Methodist Church. The list goes on to include a variety of scholars from a variety of ecclesial backgrounds, all of whom are committed to classical Christian faith.

You are now the fourth person to serve as NICNT editor. The previous two, F. F. Bruce and Gordon Fee, each wrote, like you, at least one volume in the NICNT. How does contributing to the series help you now that you’re the NICNT editor?

Bruce and Fee each wrote multiple volumes in the series and in this way helped to give the series its shape. Interestingly, the guidelines for the series that have been passed from editor to editor don’t do a lot to give the series its focus. The best advice I received from Fred Bruce when he asked me to write the NICNT on Luke was “Do it like this, but don’t do it like that . . .” Having written for the series, then, gives one a keener sense of what is needed and what temptations need to be resisted.

If you had to choose one NICNT volume as your favorite, or one that best represents the series as a whole, which would you choose?

That’s a tough question. On the one hand, I’ve often thought of Gordon Fee’s commentary on 1 Corinthians as the “standard” for evangelical commentary: clearly written, eminently readable, a model of exegesis in the service of the biblical text, biblical interpretation for the church. Among my favorites, though, would be R. T. France’s volume on Matthew, which represents decades of intimacy with Matthew’s Gospel, with his mature reflections on this Gospel evident on every page.

The series has been ongoing for many years. When and how is a decision made to replace an older volume in the NICNT?

A couple of factors guide our thinking. First, of course, a commentary can become dated in terms of the sorts of questions it seeks to answer. Second, our audience—pastors, students, and other Christian leaders—tell us that a replacement is needed as they find other commentaries more helpful. This could lead to a revised edition or to a replacement volume.

What new volumes should we look for over the next couple of years?

The most recent volume is Gareth Cockerill’s work on Hebrews, the appearance of which we continue to celebrate. Looking to the near horizon, we anticipate a revised edition of Gordon Fee’s work on 1 Corinthians, and replacement volumes on the Gospel of Mark (by Rikki Watts) and Paul’s Letter to the Galatians (by David deSilva).

Now is your opportunity to get the NICNT on sale during our Back to School Sale. While you’re there, check out all the other amazing deals we have on the NICOT, BECNT, Barth’s Church Dogmatics, and more!

Save Now on George Eldon Ladd Titles

Born this day in 1911, George Eldon Ladd is considered one of the twentieth century’s most important New Testament scholars. Ladd, born in Alberta, was educated at Gordon Divinity School (now Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary) and Harvard, where he received his PhD in classics under preeminent New Testament scholar Henry J. Cadbury. After pastoring a number of Baptist churches, Ladd went on to teach New Testament at Gordon and at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. After teaching for 30 years at Fuller, Ladd passed away in 1982.

The author of 14 books and a number of important articles, Ladd is mostly known for his works on eschatology. He was a proponent of “inaugurated eschatology”—or, as it’s more commonly called, the already-not yet. Ladd wrote, alongside his works on eschatology, about the New Testament Kingdom of God and Jesus’ resurrection; he also wrote commentaries on Matthew, Acts, and Revelation, plus a critical study of the Bible, which included a book on Rudolf Bultmann. His title on Bultmann, published in 1964, was an important work in many regards. At a time when evangelical scholarship was isolating itself from continental scholarship in fear of being infected by liberalism, Ladd fully engaged the theology of one of the twentieth century’s most influential New Testament scholars. Ladd took seriously both his personal faith in the Jesus Christ and critical and objective scholarship, and this drove him to produce the best in evangelical scholarship.

Save Now on Ladd Resources!

In 1974, Ladd published what would become his greatest contribution to New Testament scholarship: A Theology of the New Testament. To celebrate the birthday of one of the last 75 years’ most important New Testament scholars, Logos is having a weeklong sale on A Theology of the New Testament, offering it for only $24.95 with the coupon code LaddNTT. Revised in 1993, Ladd’s New Testament volume is a master class in New Testament theology. Every student, teacher, and pastor should own a copy of this vital work. But we’re not stopping with A Theology of the New Testament! We’re also offering The Last Things: An Eschatology for Laymen for only $9.99 with the coupon code LaddLastThings. These coupons codes are good through the end of the day Wednesday, August 8! Pick up your copies today, and celebrate the birthday of a giant in New Testament studies.

Now on Pre-Pub: Baker Academic Bible Interpretation Collection

Logos recently put the Baker Academic Interpretation Collection (10 vols.) on Pre-Pub. Included in this collection is Greg Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology: The Unfolding of the Old Testament in the New. Weighing in at 962 pages—not counting indexes or bibliography—Beale’s book is a New Testament tour de force.

Beale argues that the story of the Bible must be understood through the lens of an already/not yet eschatology, with a specific emphasis on the new creational reign of God through the death and resurrection of the Messiah. From Genesis’ Eden all the way to the New Eden in Revelation 21–22, Beale masterfully connects the eschatological dots. To give you a taste of what A New Testament Biblical Theology is about, let me highlight a few key points.

Not Your Typical New Testament Theology

While Beale calls his work a “New Testament” theology, it can almost be classified as a biblical theology. Beale himself admits as much when he describes his method as “overlapping in some degree not only with whole-Bible theologies but [. . .] with Old Testament biblical theologies as well.” The beauty of this book is Beale’s Old Testament acumen. He devotes over 100 pages to tracing the storyline of the Old Testament, preparing the reader for the heart of New Testament theology.

Beale first establishes the “canonical storyline of the Old Testament,” then spends the remaining chapters “moving [toward the] eschatological goal.” His discussions of “centers” (i.e., the main themes of the Bible) and “storyline” (i.e., a unified storyline with multiple themes) are helpful for understanding not only his approach, but also the various approaches of Old and New Testament theologies. Because his “storyline” approach doesn’t force him to work within one theme, Beale is free to weave a multifaceted biblical theology.

Inaugurated Eschatology (The Already and Not Yet) and the New Creation

The emphasis on inaugurated eschatology is at the heart of A New Testament Biblical Theology. According to Beale, “we should think of Christ’s life, trials, and especially death and resurrection as the central events that launched the latter days. These pivotal events of Christ’s life, trials, death and resurrection are eschatological in particular because they launched the beginning of the new creation and kingdom.” Beale concludes that “the end-time-new-creational kingdom has not been recognized sufficiently heretofore as of vital importance to a biblical theology of the New Testament, and it is this concept that I believe has the potential to refine significantly the general scholarly view of the eschatological already-not yet.”

Buy and Read This Book

Let me encourage you to go over to Logos and place your pre-order today! Everyone should read this magisterial New Testament theology.  A New Testament Biblical Theology will make you think hard about Scripture as you watch the story progress from Genesis’ Garden to Revelation’s new Garden.

Not only does this Pre-Pub contain Beale’s magnum opus—you get nine more volumes from the likes of

  • W. Randolph Tate
  • Joel B. Green
  • Craig L. Blomberg
  • And others

Don’t wait! This Pre-Pub is going fast. Order now!

Notes from Pastorum Live 2012

As the first-ever Pastorum conference wrapped up, I could sense the excitement in the crowd. Groups of people stood together discussing various sessions and what they’d taken away from the conference, even remarking that this was one of the best conferences they’d recently attended.

Many of Pastorum’s speakers used Logos to give their engaging, encouraging, challenging presentations allowing attendees to follow along on their computers or mobile devices.

I was amazed at how approachable the presenters were. I observed speakers locked in one-on-one conversation with many attendees. One of the presenters told me about meeting a man on the way to get coffee. As they walked, the man poured out his heart to the speaker. What neither of them could have known was that the lecture the speaker intended to give was exactly what that man needed to hear!

I had the privilege of getting to know many of the speakers—thinkers who I had previously known only through their books. As I sat across the table from David Garland, Craig Keener, and Richard Briggs discussing authorship, conferences, and people who’ve influenced our Christian lives, I thought to myself: Awesome—where else but Pastorum could this sort of connection possibly happen?

As we left the conference, a number of speakers told me that they’d had a fantastic time. They had enjoyed the interaction with the audience just as well as the interaction with each other. Many of the speakers don’t often get the chance to connect with their colleagues, and Pastorum made such connection possible. They were excited about next year, hinting—a full year in advance—at wanting to return.

In all, Pastorum was a tremendous success, at least for this attendee. If what we experienced this year is a sign of what’s to come, I’m already excited for next year!