The Importance of the Church Fathers

The theological insights of the early Greek and Latin Church Fathers have shaped the course of Christian history. From the Trinity and original sin to the scriptural canon and just war, looking to the early Church Fathers helps us better understand the development of Christian doctrine throughout the millennia.

The Church Fathers’ explorations of Scripture have grounded biblical commentary up to the modern era. To ignore the writings of great theologians like Augustine, Basil, Ambrose, and Chrysostom is to ignore the very roots of Christian theology. But these early patristic texts can be either difficult to find, difficult to understand (because of translation issues), or both.

In Logos, The Fathers of the Church Series provides an all-in-one patristic resource that eliminates two primary difficulties in patristic research: scope and translation. It is by far the most exhaustive patristic resource available in Logos, giving you an unparalleled ability to study these formative years in Christian history. With nearly 50,000 pages of primary-source material spanning the first through fifth centuries, easy-to-read translations brand-new to Logos, and an array of titles that can’t be found anywhere else, this series is unlike any other in the world of patristic scholarship.

A few people have had questions regarding what’s in this series compared to our Early Church Fathers Collection. Here’s what you should know:

  •    Though there is a little overlap between this series and the Early Church Fathers collection, the vast majority of these texts are brand-new to Logos. 
  •    Even with the resources that do overlap (such as some of Augustine’s works), the Fathers of the Church Series provides totally new translations produced by top-tier scholars. In many cases, the texts in the Fathers of the Church Series are easier to read and digest.
  •    About 20 of this series’ works are available in the public domain. The rest can only be purchased from publishers, and you’ll find some titles that are exclusive to this series.
  •    The series is divided into five main collections, which you can choose to purchase individually:
  1. Fathers of the Ante-Nicene Era (23 vols.)
  2. Greek Fathers of the Nicene Era (35 vols.)
  3. Latin Fathers of the Nicene Era (25 vols.)
  4. St. Augustine (30 vols.)
  5. Fathers of the Post-Nicene Era (14 vols.)

With Logos’ tools and functionality, this series is hands-down the most powerful patristic study tool available anywhere.

Explore the roots of Christian history and theology with the best patristic library on the market: pre-order the Church Fathers Series today!

Get 30% off the Fathers of the Church Series

fathers-of-the-church-seriesThe Fathers of The Church Series is a truly exciting new collection in Logos. The biggest collection of patristic documents ever gathered in English translation—and still growing!—this series represents the absolute best in early church history.

It’s difficult to put into words just how valuable this series really is. Maybe it’s the history buff in me, but it’s hard to deny that nearly 50,000 pages of patristic primary-source material ranging from the first to the fifth centuries isn’t something exciting. It’s even harder to deny that, in Logos, this collection is arguably the most powerful patristic study tool available to students and scholars anywhere.

Brilliant scholarship at an incredible price

What makes this collection so valuable isn’t just the sheer immensity of text (at less $.04 per page, the absolute best value anywhere): it’s the brilliant scholarship and translation that this series is renowned for in the English-speaking world. The English translations of both Greek and Latin texts are clear and easy to read, and the scholarship behind them is unparalleled both in scope and in scale.

While there’s some overlap with the Early Church Fathers collection, most of these works are brand-new to Logos, and all of them offer new and improved translations. Plus, this edition includes many of the commentaries the early Church Fathers wrote on books of the Bible, most of which are omitted in the Schaff edition. [Read more...]

Get 25% Off the Post-Reformation Catholic Thought and Piety Collection (27 vols.)

post-reformation-catholic-thought-and-pietyWhat does it mean to pray? How is it that we enter God’s presence through devotion and meditation? What is the meaning of suffering? These are the kinds of questions asked by many of the sixteenth century’s great Christian mystics, scholars, and saints.

While polemical wars were waged between the Catholic Church and Protestant Reformers, many thinkers continued to focus on the internal battle waged within our own souls. This focus on interiority produced some of the greatest mystical, poetic, and devotional literature ever written. Now it’s compiled in the enormous Post-Reformation Catholic Thought and Piety Collection.

The sixteenth century was a time of incredible theological and spiritual development. Not only were substantial amounts of Protestant literature being produced; counter-reformers, poets, and mystics were also writing works that add essential context to the debates happening in and around the Protestant Reformation. Many such works are famous throughout all of Christendom, such as John of the Cross’ The Dark Night of the Soul or Teresa of Avila’s The Way of Perfection—but it’s often forgotten that these very devotional works were written during the heat of the sixteenth century’s doctrinal disputes. [Read more...]

Get 20% Off Tools for Exegesis

What’s the “right way” to interpret Scripture?

Since the emergence of biblical criticism, scholars have argued over how to interpret the Bible. Some think that the text’s meaning can be understood only when we place ourselves in the shoes of the people who wrote it (in this case, Jews living 2,000–3,000 years ago). Others think that the text’s meaning can be reached only through the divine mediation of the Holy Spirit, or some other source of direct divine authority.

From this latter camp, we often hear arguments that history simply “doesn’t matter”—that the text “speaks for itself,” and that further study about the texts’ language and context is useless at best and damaging to faith at worst. On the other hand, from those advocating “higher criticism,” we hear that the text “has no meaning” outside of its historical context—that in order to come to a consensus about the text’s truth (if such a truth even exists), we must see exactly as the writers saw.

And so the student of Scripture is torn: which of these seemingly irreconcilable approaches is right[Read more...]