Pets That Love Logos

You know we’re passionate about bringing you the best possible tools for studying and presenting the Word. You also know we’re passionate about our mission to serve the church. But did you know we’re passionate about our family pets, too?

We want to see your pets! Post a photo of your furry friend with Logos merchandise and tag it on Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #PetsLoveLogos. Then, check out everyone’s pets on our Tagboard.

With over 400 employees, we have hundreds of pets to choose from, but here are four that we think you’ll like:

pets-love-logos-tallulah-kangaroola

Tallulah Kangaroola

This adorable baby red kangaroo belongs to Scott Lindsey, director of ministry relations, and his wife, Michelle. Tallulah particularly bonded with their youngest daughter, Havensong. When not curled up in her carrying pouch or playing with Havensong, Tallulah enjoys donning a soft Logos onesie! This onesie is made from 100% organic cotton—making it both environmentally friendly and comfortable, perfect for kids and kangaroos alike.

 

 

Louie the Rhodesian Ridgebackpets-love-logos-louie

Rhodesian Ridgebacks are known for the strip of fur along their spines that grows backward, creating a ridge. Louie is looking particularly handsome in his blue tie adorned with a Logos sticker! Louie is part of recruiter Jennifer Spoelstra’s family, and he enjoys long cross-country trail runs with Spoelstra’s husband, Jared. You can get these stickers in two sizes—each pack includes both large and small icons to fit any surface.

 

Kes the Canadian Sphynx Catpets-love-logos-kes-the-cat

With blue point markings and baby-blue eyes, Kes is a striking girl! She’s been a part of my family for nearly two years, but I don’t think she’ll ever be big enough to fit a Logos onesie. Sphynx cats are nearly hairless, with a fine dusting of peach fuzz that is usually thicker on the tail, toes, and nose. Kes enjoys cuddling, knocking things off the kitchen counter, and playing fetch.

 

Wolfgang the Hedgehogpets-love-logos-wolfgang-the-hedgehog

Tiny and spiny, Wolfgang is an adorable little hedgehog. He is pretty relaxed, often posing for photographs snapped by owner Chris Jespersen, a member of our video team. In this shot, Wolfgang broke out his party hat and climbed into a bowl—both adorned with Logos stickers for a Logos-themed celebration! If you’re a fan of Faithlife, you can expand your sticker collection with its green leaf logo, too.

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We want to see your pets! Post their photos to Facebook or Twitter with the hashtag #PetsLoveLogos, and don’t forget to include Logos merchandise in your photo! Logos carries a ton of items that you and your pets will love—from onesies and coffee mugs to our newest Verse of the Day merchandise.

Pick up some new Logos merchandise today, and show us your pet photos!​

Herman Ridderbos: A Scholar of Substance

Ridderbos-blog-image_400x117Today’s guest post is written by Dr. Jim West. Dr. West is adjunct professor of biblical studies at the Quartz Hill School of Theology and pastor of Petros Baptist Church, Petros, Tennessee. He has written a number of books, including ‘Christ Our Captain’: An Introduction to Huldrych Zwingli, and numerous articles. He serves as language editor for the Scandinavian Journal of the Old Testament and language revision editor for the Copenhagen International Seminar.

The New Testament scholar Herman Ridderbos (1909–2007) will soon have many of his primary writings made available from Logos. These include The Coming of the Kingdom, Paul and Jesus: Origin and General Character of Paul’s Preaching of Christ, The Authority of the New Testament Scriptures, Bultmann, When the Time Had Fully Come: Studies in New Testament Theology, Paul: An Outline of His Theology, Studies in Scripture and Its Authority, The Gospel of John: A Theological Commentary, and Redemptive History and the New Testament Scriptures.

As readers can see quite easily, Herman Ridderbos contributed to our understanding of the Synoptic Gospels, Paul, and the Pauline epistles, along with the Gospel of John. Those contributions were neither ‘flash in the pan’ nor faddish in nature: they were substantive and meaningful and still, even now, very much worth reading. Especially worthy of  notice are his volumes on the Kingdom and Paul’s theology, along with his little volume on Bultmann, which, though containing many points of disagreement, demonstrates that Ridderbos took the time to read, and ponder, the great Marburg Theologian’s ideas. Something that most Evangelicals cannot say of themselves or many of their mentors.

Ridderbos has been praised for his insightful work by many outstanding scholars. And he has been excoriated by others, who fail to grasp, I think, his overarching purpose and who instead focus on what they deem shortcomings. In other words, they wish Ridderbos to mirror their views instead of allowing him his own voice. A voice, it has to be said, which is very much worth hearing.

The opportunity to make use of Ridderbos’ works should not be ignored by anyone working in the Gospels or Paul. Anyone who can write the following deserves to be applauded for his courage and forthrightness:

ridderbos“In recent decades the question of the authority of the Canon has again been brought to the fore in New Testament theology. It is often said now that the authority of the Canon is to be accepted because and in so far as God speaks to us in the books of the Canon. But in this very criterion “in so far as” lies the difficulty of the problem and the danger of subjectivism. Some wish to return to the essential content of the Gospel as the “Canon in the Canon.” They search for an incontestable objective measure within Scripture. Others protest that this is a too static interpretation of the Canon. God speaks—so they say—now here, and then again there, in Scripture. It is the preaching, the kerygma, they say, in which Scripture again and again shows itself as Canon. This actualistic concept of the Canon is interpreted by others in a still more subjectivistic manner: Canon is only that which here and now (hic et nunc) signifies the Word of God for me. For one like Ernst  Käsemann, for instance, the Canon, as it lies before us, is not the Word of God nor identical with the gospel, but it is God’s Word only in so far as it becomes gospel. The question, what then is the gospel, cannot be decided through exposition of Scripture, but only through the believer who “puts his ear to Scripture to listen” and is convinced by the Spirit (cf. Käsemann, Evangelische Theologie, 1951–52, p. 21).

It is clear that on this approach the Canon of the New Testament as a closed collection of 27 books becomes a very problematical matter. Can we still hold fast to the creed of the Reformation: We accept all these books as holy and canonical? What basis remains for the Church to believe that God not only wishes to use the books of the Bible as a medium in which he speaks to us through the Holy Spirit, but that he wishes also to bind the Church to the Canon of the New Testament? Can we continue to call upon the self-evidence of Scripture? Or are additional considerations to be gathered out of Scripture itself whereby the place and significance of the Canon of the New Testament come to stand more plainly before us in the plan of God’s salvation? In the measure in which we lay emphasis upon the objectivity of the Canon upon Scripture as absolute authority, this question will have our attention.”

Ridderbos, Herman. “The Canon of the New Testament.” Revelation and the Bible: Contemporary Evangelical Thought, ed. Henry, Carl F. H. Grand Rapids: Baker, 1968; London: Tyndale, 1959. 191–192.

Save 50% on Resources for Lent

Lent_blog_400x147In many Christian traditions (Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Anglican and Presbyterian), this Wednesday marks the first day of Lent. For 40 days, observers everywhere will be forsaking things like meat, chocolate, or television—all in preparation for Easter. But why 40 days? What is Lent all about?

Origins of Lent’s 40 days

The tradition echoes Jesus’ fast during his 40 days and nights in the desert (Matt. 4:1-2), where he endured temptations offered by the devil himself. In that extreme climate, Jesus went without a bite to eat for more than a month. He must have been ravenous when the devil found him. And the theme of the first temptation? Bread (Matt. 4:3). After resisting the devil three times, Jesus banished him and went on to begin his public ministry, the culmination of which was his death on cross. Lent is a time of penance, prayer, and reflection as we contemplate Jesus’ ultimate gifts: his sinless life as a sacrifice for our sins, and his triumph over death.

The Hallmarks of Lent

Lent has many themes, but the three major motifs are denial, prayer, and reflection.

In honor of Christ, denial is exercised very intentionally during Lent. Jesus’ very life on earth was an example—he denied himself his incarnate form, humbling himself to walk among us, obedient to the point of death (Php. 2:5-8). And from the pages of the Bible he asks us to deny ourselves, take up the cross, and follow him (Matt 16:24). The self-denial associated with Lent helps focus our thoughts on him.

Focusing thoughts on God can easily give way to prayer and reflection. Jesus reveals the importance of prayer through example (Luke 6:12) and beseeches us to pray using parables (Luke 18:1). Through prayer and seeking God, Lent observers prepare for Easter by reflecting on why we celebrate it:

For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his footsteps, who did not commit sin, nor was deceit found in his mouth, who when he was reviled, did not revile in return; when suffering, he did not threaten, but entrusted himself to the one who judges justly, who himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we may die to sins and live to righteousness, by whose wounds you were healed. (1 Peter 2:21–22)

This year, to help you reflect on Christ’s sacrifice during Lent, we’re offering several resources at 50% off:

Fifty Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die by John Piper

John Piper gathers 50 New Testament answers to the most important question faced by believers: What did God achieve for us in sending his Son to die? This book will help you reflect on the true meaning of Christ’s sacrifice. Get it now for only $4.98.

Jesus and the Victory of God by N. T. Wright

N. T. Wright pens a compelling account of how Jesus himself understood his mission as the divinely ordained fulfillment of Israel’s destiny. Get this resource for only $17.49.

The Murder of Jesus by John MacArthur

John MacArthur tells the story of Christ’s sacrifice, with special attention to Jesus’ words on the cross, the miracle that attended the Crucifixion, and the true meaning of Christ’s atoning work. Get this resource for only $7.50!

We’ve also discounted these powerful titles:

All Lent discounts extend through Feb. 13, so take advantage of these prices today!

Leave us a comment and tell us how you’ll be participating in Lent this year.

Black Friday: Don’t Miss These Deals!

You can avoid the lines, the rush, and the craze during this year’s Black Friday madness. In fact, we want you to be able to enjoy your Black Friday shopping from the comfort of your own home. With the Like-athon, we gave you the power to create the ideal sale. And with nearly 9,000 Likes across Logos.com, you told us loud and clear what you wanted to see discounted!

Thanks to your collaborative efforts, Logos is ushering in the holiday season with our most-Liked products at incredible discounts! Start your holiday shopping off right with hundreds of dollars in savings on top products like:

The New International Commentary on the Old and New Testament (44 vols.)

Print: $2,273  Regularly: $1,699.95

Only $1,399.95 with the coupon code BFRIDAY8

This decades-long project has become recognized by scholars, pastors, and serious Bible students as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (6 vols.)

Regularly: $269.95

Get it now for only $199.95 with coupon code BFRIDAY4!

With over 6,000 entries by 800 authors, this definitive collection is a landmark in biblical scholarship. The unabridged, six-volume Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary contains 7,200 packed pages, including numerous illustrations. Covering countless biblical subjects, the Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary is a tremendous help for in-depth biblical exploration. During the Black Friday Like-athon, it’s 25% off!

A. W. Tozer Collection (57 vols.)

Print: $795  Regularly: $399.95

The Tozer collection can be yours for only $195.95 with coupon code BFRIDAY7

This collection consists of 57 books written by Tozer or compiled posthumously from his sermons and editorials. In all, this astounding collection contains approximately 11,000 pages filled with the inspirational, Christ-centered words only Tozer could pen.The 57 fantastic books of this collection are priced at 50% off for Black Friday.

These are only a few of the collections we’ve marked down during the Black Friday Sale. Visit Logos.com/BlackFriday by December 3 to see the complete list of deals available, including discounts on resources like:

  • IVP Dictionary of the Old Testament Bundle
  • Commentary on the New Testament Use of the Old Testament
  • John MacArthur Bundle
  • Learn to Use Biblical Greek and Hebrew with Logos Bible Software

Don’t forget, this holiday season is a perfect time to upgrade! Check out the custom upgrade discount calculator to see your special price to move to Logos 5.

Don’t Forget: You’re in Charge of Our Black Friday Deals!

This year, our Black Friday Like-athon is putting you in charge of our Black Friday sales, and the products you’re interested in are rising to the top. So far, there have been over 4,000 Likes across Logos.com.

If you haven’t had a chance to Like all the products you want to see in the Black Friday sale, don’t wait—there’s a limited time left to have your Likes count toward Black Friday savings. So check in with your family, friends, online social networks and encourage them to get their Like in, too. For every 1,500 Likes, we’ll drop the prices on some of the most Liked products!

Getting involved is as simple as going to your favorite products’ pages, finding the Like button beneath the product image, and pressing it.That’s it! The more an item’s liked, the better its chances to end up as part of the Black Friday sale.

We’ll be starting the Black Friday discounts November 21 to give you a few more days to save. If you want to hear when your special deals are released, sign up for the Black Friday email list today. Not only will the deals be sent directly to your inbox—you’ll also receive an exclusive post–Black Friday special. Sign up now!

*Base packages, Pre-Pub products, and Community Pricing resources will not be included in this sale. Discounts will vary based on publisher agreements.

Black Friday: You Choose the Deals!

Logos has a history of coming up with interesting Black Friday sales. This year, we’re going to top them all. We’re putting you in charge with the Logos Black Friday Like-athon.

It’s simple—to save up to 50% on your favorite Logos products, just Like them, and have your friends do the same! Together, you’ll decide which products we mark down, and for every 1,500 Likes racked up across Logos.com, we’ll drop those products’ prices by 10%.

Do you love the Nelson Bible Reference Bundle? Is owning the Anchor Yale Bible a dream that a large discount would make possible? Has the Abraham curriculum brought your church closer together? Just Like every product that you’ve enjoyed (or that you want to see discounted), and encourage others to do so, too—your family, your friends, your online social networks, everyone.

So what are you waiting for? Visit Logos.com now and start Liking your favorite books and resources!

P. S. If you love Logos, don’t forget to become a fan on our Facebook page.

*Base packages, Pre-Pub products, and Community Pricing resources will not be included in this sale. Discounts will vary based on publisher agreements.

Save Now on the Works of Arminius!

“Bona Conscientia Paradisus”
“A good conscience is paradise”—The Works of Arminius, vol. 1

It was, perhaps, on this principle that Jacobus Arminius carved a place for himself in theological history by speaking out against many of his colleagues. On this date in 1609, Jacobus Arminius died.

Arminius, born Jacobus Harmen, began life in a small Holland town in 1560, a turbulent time. By the time he was 15, his mother and siblings were killed by Spanish military aggressors as Spain attempted to quell rebellions and the Reformation.

Harmen’s first patron, Theodore Emilius, was a clergyman who led Jacobus to dedicate his life to the service of God. The custom of the day was that educated men Latinize their names or choose a suitable Latin substitute. Harmen settled on Arminius.

His studies included lectures from Lambertus Danaeus and Johann Kolmann, the latter of whom taught against high Calvinism. In 1588, Arminius began preaching in Amsterdam. Dirck Coornhert, a man who had risked his life for his country during the Reformation, printed a pamphlet disagreeing with John Calvin. The ecclesiastical senate of Amsterdam requested that Arminius defend Calvin’s theories in a response.

After deliberating over the evidence presented by the Scriptures, Arminius reached a decision—in favor of Coornhert. From that point on, he began integrating his new view of theology into his preaching and writing. His influence survived the grave, sparking Arminianism, a theology that survives to this day, exactly 403 years after his death.

You can experience this great man’s original teachings with The Works of Arminius (4 vols.), which contains all of Arminius’ major essays, speeches, lectures, and more. Get this collection now for only $74.95 as part of our ongoing Pastor Appreciation Month sale! With coupon code PAM14, you can save 25% on this valuable collection—get your copy now.

The Pastor Appreciation Month deals last only through the end of October. Don’t miss a single one! Check out our entire lineup.

Get Resources from Your Favorite Resurgence Speakers

Resurgence 2012 is right around the corner, and this year’s lineup features some of the world’s most successful leaders. Catch Rick Warren, Greg Laurie, Mark Driscoll, James MacDonald, Craig Groeschel, and Miles McPherson in person on the R12 stage.

Resurgence 2012 isn’t the only place you can go to hear the voices of these influential men—Logos Bible Software connects you to their works. Build your library today with resources like Greg Laurie’s Why Believe?: Exploring the Honest Questions of Seekers, or get the Mark Driscoll Sermon Archive and dive into 10 years’ worth of thought-provoking messages.

Pick up James MacDonald’s discourse on the infallibility of the Scriptures in God Wrote a Book, or study the Bible Rick Warren’s way with Rick Warren’s Bible Study Methods.

If you want to be a part of the action, there’s still time to register for Resurgence 2012. This year’s conference will take place in Irvine, CA, Oct. 9–10. Catch the speakers’ messages by registering for the conference, and purchase their Logos resources today!