The Heat Is On: Logos’ 2014 Curry Cook-off

logos-curry-cook-off-2014

On August 7, things got heated at Logos Bible Software. That Thursday was Logos’ annual curry cook-off. One of our company values is awesomeness, and our quarterly cook-offs are one way we live that out.

Though this cook-off was the first for many, it proved an incredible experience. We had eight entries featuring a fantastic array of flavors.

The winners were:

  • First place: Kiel Nation (Parvati’s Penance)
  • Second place: Peter Venable (Thai Panang)
  • Third place: Tie between Derek Fekkes (Thai Yellow Curry) and Michael Schoonmaker (My Daaling Clementine)
logos-curry-cook-off-2014-1

Participants dish out their curry entries for the judges.

logos-curry-cook-off-2014-2

Kiel Nation serves his winning entry—Parvati’s Penance.

logos-curry-cook-off-2014-3

Our judges enjoyed samples of each dish before selecting the winners.

Check out more photos from this event on our Facebook page:

 

* * *

Of course, the curry cook-off is just one of the many reasons we enjoy working at Logos. And we’re always looking for talented, awesome employees. Join in the fun—check out our current job openings!

Comments

  1. Frank Payne says:

    How about sharing those recipes with us?

    • Hi Frank, sorry for my delay. The marketing guys just got around to telling me there was a request for a recipe, so I pulled myself away from mobile ed and I found you here.

      I don’t have a recipe as much as muscle memory from doing it so much. I had a south Indian roommate in college and Seminary and we learned how to make an assortment of Hyderabadi curries together from his mother and sister.

      While in Seminary we made friends with many Indian MBA majors at a local university and, to our complete delight, discovered more curries from other regions of India as our new friends insisted on returning our culinary favors. All our skills were acquired by watching and repeating, seasoning everything to taste. To date I have not measured anything I’ve made, aside from informal “pinches” of this and “scoops” of that. My highest recommendation is experimentation, fun, and learning from all the failures.

      I can, however, share some details about this cook-off winning dish, affectionately named “Parvati’s Penance.”

      It is technically a Chicken Korma with carrots, cauliflower and cashews.

      Other ingredients include the following:

      - cumin
      - coriander
      - cinnamon
      - Indian chili
      - turmeric
      - garam masala
      - cardamom
      - curry leaf
      - coconut milk
      - tomatoes
      - onions
      - garlic
      - cilantro
      - mustard seeds
      - cumin seeds
      - dried red chilis

      I cook with a pot and a frying pan (I prefer cast iron skillet). I use the pot for the base of the dish and the pan for the seasonings which I fry until nearly burnt, or more than sufficiently caramelized. I end up dumping those on top of the base when the dish is near completion.

      Into the pot of happiness, butter and tomatoes until the tomatoes are cooked down into a good sauce. I add the carrots in early so they have more time to soften. Then I add the chicken, which I’ve usually marinated for 24 hours or so, but the spices can be added at any point really, including coriander, cardamum, turmeric, indian chili, cumin powder and cinnamon. Be sure to salt the base to taste before you add the chicken. I let that cook on medium until the chicken is done. The last thing I add is the coconut milk.

      Into the frying pan of joy, (olive oil, coconut oil, or ghee preferred) first, mustard seeds until they pop with enthusiasm. Then whole garlic cloves, cumin seeds, dried red chilis, and curry leaves. I let those begin to char, the garlic cloves starting to turn brown, and I add the onions, cut julienne style. I let those caramelize like mad, deep golden brown, until the sugars have almost all released and are even starting to burn a bit. At some point in this process I add the cauliflower and cashews and stir them in. They absorbs the flavor very well, and take about 15 minutes to soften and begin caramelizing as well. Once that’s done, I dump on top of the pot with the base of the dish.

      The finishing move is to add cilantro on top, and then garam masala powdered over top of the entire dish. Make sure it’s seasoned to taste. Let it sit until cool enough to attack like a tasmanian devil, and go for it. I recommend basmati rice, because it’s the best.

      I hope that gives you enough direction to get into the game. May the odds be ever in your flavor.

  2. Jeff Smith says:

    I'm sure there was some heated discussions!! – Love Curry!!

  3. Randy Nation says:

    Just one more proof that this job was made for you!

  4. Kiel Nation says:

    Hi Frank, sorry for my delay. The marketing guys just got around to telling me there was a request for a recipe, so I pulled myself away from mobile ed and I found you here.

    I don't have a recipe as much as muscle memory from doing it so much. I had a south Indian roommate in college and Seminary and we learned how to make an assortment of Hyderabadi curries together from his mother and sister.

    While in Seminary we made friends with many Indian MBA majors at a local university and, to our complete delight, discovered more curries from other regions of India as our new friends insisted on returning our culinary favors. All our skills were acquired by watching and repeating, seasoning everything to taste. To date I have not measured anything I've made, aside from informal "pinches" of this and "scoops" of that. My highest recommendation is experimentation, fun, and learning from all the failures.

    I can, however, share some details about this cook-off winning dish, affectionately named "Parvati's Penance."

    It is technically a Chicken Korma with carrots, cauliflower and cashews.

    Other ingredients include the following:

    - cumin
    - coriander
    - cinnamon
    - Indian chili
    - turmeric
    - garam masala
    - cardamom
    - curry leaf
    - coconut milk
    - tomatoes
    - onions
    - garlic
    - cilantro
    - mustard seeds
    - cumin seeds
    - dried red chilis

    I cook with a pot and a frying pan (I prefer cast iron skillet). I use the pot for the base of the dish and the pan for the seasonings which I fry until nearly burnt, or more than sufficiently caramelized. I end up dumping those on top of the base when the dish is near completion.

    Into the pot of happiness, butter and tomatoes until the tomatoes are cooked down into a good sauce. I add the carrots in early so they have more time to soften. Then I add the chicken, which I've usually marinated for 24 hours or so, but the spices can be added at any point really, including coriander, cardamum, turmeric, indian chili, cumin powder and cinnamon. Be sure to salt the base to taste before you add the chicken. I let that cook on medium until the chicken is done. The last thing I add is the coconut milk.

    Into the frying pan of joy, (olive oil, coconut oil, or ghee preferred) first, mustard seeds until they pop with enthusiasm. Then whole garlic cloves, cumin seeds, dried red chilis, and curry leaves. I let those begin to char, the garlic cloves starting to turn brown, and I add the onions, cut julienne style. I let those caramelize like mad, deep golden brown, until the sugars have almost all released and are even starting to burn a bit. At some point in this process I add the cauliflower and cashews and stir them in. They absorbs the flavor very well, and take about 15 minutes to soften and begin caramelizing as well. Once that's done, I dump on top of the pot with the base of the dish.

    The finishing move is to add cilantro on top, and then garam masala powdered over top of the entire dish. Make sure it's seasoned to taste. Let it sit until cool enough to attack like a tasmanian devil, and go for it. I recommend basmati rice, because it's the best.

    I hope that gives you enough direction to get into the game. May the odds be ever in your flavor.

Speak Your Mind

*