Explore the Ancient World with Cutting-Edge Archaeology Research

American-Schools-of-Oriental-ResearchWe’re pleased to announce a new partnership with The American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR), an academic organization dedicated to the study and preservation of the culture and history of the Near East. Committed to “initiating, encouraging and supporting research into the culture of the Near East . . . and helping the public to understand the findings of that research,” ASOR plays a crucial role among academics working in the fields of archaeology and biblical and Near Eastern studies, as well as those outside the academy wishing to learn from their research.

For several decades, ASOR has published three academic journals, as well as a newsletter and monograph series. We recently listed several volumes of their journals on Pre-Pub. If you’re interested in biblical studies and archaeology, you’ll want these resources.

A must-have for Near Eastern studies

bulletin-of-the-american-schools-of-oriental-research

Founded in 1919, the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research is an interdisciplinary journal that includes articles about the Near East and the eastern Mediterranean world from the Paleolithic period through Islamic times. The journal features articles in a multitude of disciplines, including art and archaeology, history, anthropology, geography, philology and epigraphy, and literature. With an emphasis on the significance of archaeological discovery and excavation for understanding Near Eastern culture, BASOR provides cutting-edge research on the ancient world.

If academic writing and topics seem intimidating, rest assured that BASOR is designed to serve both lay and academic audiences. There’s simply no better way to get a sense of recent research in archaeology and biblical and Near Eastern studies.

Get the Bulletin of the American Schools of Oriental Research before the price goes up!

Interested in more from ASOR? Check out their other journals on Pre-Pub—Biblical Archaeologist / Near Eastern Archaeology (1992–2011) and the Journal of Cuneiform Studies (1993–2011).

Comments

  1. Nap Del Prado says:

    Not sure of the pagan Ankh logo here of Asor. Better pray about this.

  2. ASOR and their publications produce some of the finest archaeological, textual and historical discussions in the world. Many fine evangelicals are a member of this society and contribute to it including myself, as well as others from excellent institutions and organizations. These journals: NEA (formally Biblical Archaeologist) and BASOR contain a wealth of information and puts one in the center of the latest scholarship, information, and ideas. However, if one is not afraid of doing their “homework,” (Of course one always reads with a discerning eye no matter what the source!) these are a great set of “tools” to add to anyone’s collections. One example BA (Biblical Archaeologists) Vol. 14:4, on Corinth, excellent historical information.

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