Logos 5: Logos and Knox Theological Seminary

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I, along with other Logos users, recently had the privilege of sitting at the feet of master preacher and communicator Dr. Haddon Robinson. What an honor to listen to his biblical insights as we participated in the course “The Art of Expository Preaching,” part of the Knox / Logos DMin program. We were transformed into sponges as Dr. Robinson guided us through numerous passages, carefully exposing the text’s “big idea.” If you’re not familiar with the Knox / Logos program, please check it out here.

Knox Seminary class

The icing on the cake was having Logos close at hand to check out cross-references and track down Hebrew and Greek words. For example, we examined Mark 4:35–41, in which Jesus calms the storm. Regarding v. 39, “And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, ‘Peace! Be still!,’” Dr. Robinson asked, “Does this wording sound familiar to a previous event in Mark?”

Here’s what I did, and you can do, to answer that question:

  • Open a Bible with the reverse interlinear option, such as the ESV or LEB
  • Navigate to Mark 4:39 (A)
  • Right-click on the word rebuked (ESV) (B)
  • Select Lemma “the Greek word” (C) | Search this resource (D)

Image 1 for Right Mouse Searching steps

  • Click Aligned on the search panel to display the search hits in a center column (E)
  • Repeat the above search for the word still (ESV) (F)

Image 2 for Right Mouse Searching

These searches, locating all occurrences of the Greek lemmas regardless of how they’re translated in English, replace the Englishman’s Greek (and Hebrew) Concordance print editions that we lugged around.

Notice that Mark 1:25 contains the same words rebuke and be still as Jesus confronts an unclean spirit. Was this just an ordinary, “natural” storm in Mark 4? That’s what we wrestled with in class, and I’ll leave the answer to you.

The point I’m making is that Logos, even in the classroom, provides instant access to biblical information. Remember, don’t leave home without Logos!