Save 50% on Resources for Lent

Lent_blog_400x147In many Christian traditions (Catholic, Lutheran, Methodist, Anglican and Presbyterian), this Wednesday marks the first day of Lent. For 40 days, observers everywhere will be forsaking things like meat, chocolate, or television—all in preparation for Easter. But why 40 days? What is Lent all about?

Origins of Lent’s 40 days

The tradition echoes Jesus’ fast during his 40 days and nights in the desert (Matt. 4:1-2), where he endured temptations offered by the devil himself. In that extreme climate, Jesus went without a bite to eat for more than a month. He must have been ravenous when the devil found him. And the theme of the first temptation? Bread (Matt. 4:3). After resisting the devil three times, Jesus banished him and went on to begin his public ministry, the culmination of which was his death on cross. Lent is a time of penance, prayer, and reflection as we contemplate Jesus’ ultimate gifts: his sinless life as a sacrifice for our sins, and his triumph over death.

The Hallmarks of Lent

Lent has many themes, but the three major motifs are denial, prayer, and reflection.

In honor of Christ, denial is exercised very intentionally during Lent. Jesus’ very life on earth was an example—he denied himself his incarnate form, humbling himself to walk among us, obedient to the point of death (Php. 2:5-8). And from the pages of the Bible he asks us to deny ourselves, take up the cross, and follow him (Matt 16:24). The self-denial associated with Lent helps focus our thoughts on him.

Focusing thoughts on God can easily give way to prayer and reflection. Jesus reveals the importance of prayer through example (Luke 6:12) and beseeches us to pray using parables (Luke 18:1). Through prayer and seeking God, Lent observers prepare for Easter by reflecting on why we celebrate it:

For to this you were called, because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, so that you should follow in his footsteps, who did not commit sin, nor was deceit found in his mouth, who when he was reviled, did not revile in return; when suffering, he did not threaten, but entrusted himself to the one who judges justly, who himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, so that we may die to sins and live to righteousness, by whose wounds you were healed. (1 Peter 2:21–22)

This year, to help you reflect on Christ’s sacrifice during Lent, we’re offering several resources at 50% off:

Fifty Reasons Why Jesus Came to Die by John Piper

John Piper gathers 50 New Testament answers to the most important question faced by believers: What did God achieve for us in sending his Son to die? This book will help you reflect on the true meaning of Christ’s sacrifice. Get it now for only $4.98.

Jesus and the Victory of God by N. T. Wright

N. T. Wright pens a compelling account of how Jesus himself understood his mission as the divinely ordained fulfillment of Israel’s destiny. Get this resource for only $17.49.

The Murder of Jesus by John MacArthur

John MacArthur tells the story of Christ’s sacrifice, with special attention to Jesus’ words on the cross, the miracle that attended the Crucifixion, and the true meaning of Christ’s atoning work. Get this resource for only $7.50!

We’ve also discounted these powerful titles:

All Lent discounts extend through Feb. 13, so take advantage of these prices today!

Leave us a comment and tell us how you’ll be participating in Lent this year.

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2 Responses to “Save 50% on Resources for Lent”

  1. jinkyu cho February 12, 2013 at 2:34 pm #

    I will preach him and his cross.

    • Stephen Kerr February 13, 2013 at 6:45 pm #

      Fr. Raymond Brown was a premier biblical scholar (d. 1998)…Catholic Priest. His work on the Death of the Messiah (above) and the companion Birth of the Messiah are exhaustive and scholarly. On sale at 50% off is well worth the purchase!