Archive - August, 2012

Knox DMin Classes Kick Off in Bellingham, WA

Dr. Samuel Lamerson

You’ve probably heard about Knox Theological Seminary’s DMin in Preaching and Teaching. It’s an amazing opportunity to learn world-class theology while mastering the world’s best Bible study software.

The first round of classes kicked off in Bellingham, WA, August 13! If you missed the first classes, though, you don’t have to wait for the DMin program to start over. One of the wonderful things about the program is that the classes run cyclically. You can start the program anywhere in the cycle and be on track to earn your doctorate in three years.

Here’s a rundown of the first two classes that students attended:

Enriching Preaching through Logos Bible Software

This course introduces students to a foundation of sound exegetical competence upon which to build an effective teaching and preaching ministry. Developed to teach pastors and teachers the latest software tools in exegetical analysis, this class stresses both skill and time efficiency. Students learn to use Logos Bible Software as a resource—a source of thousands of illustrations and sermon texts to enrich biblical teaching. The class develops the timeless principles of classical rhetoric, as first identified by Aristotle, to give structure and force to students’ messages.

This class is taught by Dr. Samuel Lamerson, whose teaching philosophy can be expressed in this Yeats quotation: “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” Dr. Lamerson seeks to light a fire in his students causing them to become lifelong students of God’s Word. He uniquely combines academic research and teaching with 16 years of pastoral experience, ranging from senior pastor to director of children’s ministries.

The Art of Exegetical Theology in Preaching

Dr. Warren Gage

Moving beyond textual analysis, this course helps students look at the totality of the biblical canon’s structure. Students look to the iconic aspect of the text, developing an awareness of form and a sense of symbol. Exploring the redemptive message of the Bible as story, students learn to tell the story of heaven’s bridegroom, who came to slay the great, red dragon, to rescue his beloved, and to take her to the palace of his father, the king.

Instructor Dr. Warren Gage believes that students should be trained to preach the Word, be prepared in season and out of season to correct, rebuke, and encourage, with great patience and careful instruction (2 Tim. 4:2–3). Passionate about biblical theology, Dr. Gage relishes the opportunity to prepare Knox students for the highest of all callings—the Gospel ministry of our lord Jesus Christ.

Get Started on Your Doctorate Today

The next classes will be held in October in Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

  • The Art of Exegetical Theology in Preaching—October 15–19 
  • Biblical Theology and Preaching That Inspires—October 22–26

Deadline to apply is September 19, so apply now and save your seat for the next round of classes!

Save Now on Our Most Popular Resources!

Summer’s coming to a close, and you know what that means—people everywhere are getting ready to go back to school. If you’re looking for the best prices on the finest academic resources, Logos has you covered! Whether you’re a student or not, our Back to School Sale will help you save big on some of our most popular resources.

Here’s just a few of the amazing resources and amazing prices you’ll find:

The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (23 vols.)

Retail: $899.95 

Only $689.95 with Coupon Code B2SNICOT

The NICOT has long been the gold standard in Old Testament exegesis. Such authors as Gordon Wenham, Bruce Waltke, Tremper Longman III, and Daniel Block make this a must-have series.

New International Commentary on the New Testament (21 vols.)

Retail: $879.95 

Only $679.95 with Coupon Code B2SNICNT

Begun in the late 1940s by an international team of New Testament scholars, the NICNT series has earned pastors’, students’, and scholars’ acclaim as a critical yet orthodox commentary marked by solid biblical scholarship within the evangelical Protestant tradition.

Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (15 vols.) 

Retail: 699.95

Only $449.95 with Coupon Code B2SBECNT

The BECNT is one of today’s most respected sources for New Testament exegesis. Praised for its insightful scholarship, the BECNT is an essential exegetical commentary for any Bible study library.

That’s Not All!

We have more savings in store for you. Take a look at the Back to School Sale now for deep discounts on valuable resources!

Know Your Way around Israel? Lead a Tour!

A couple of months ago, we mentioned upcoming Israel tours and asked for input on various tour models. (If you haven’t already, help us design these tours—go ahead and take the survey now!) From the survey results so far, we’ve noticed that the majority of you are interested in scholar-led tours.

These tours will be led by experts in Israel’s history and geography. The guides will provide information and insight as they lead you through the Holy Land’s most memorable and significant locations—the Mt. of Beatitudes, Qumran, and more.

Interested in Leading a Tour?

Are you proficient in, and knowledgeable about, Israel’s history? Have you traveled to the Holy Land multiple times? We might want you to help lead Israel tours! If you fall into these categories and are interested in leading one of the tours, send us an email at faithlifetours@logos.com. If you know someone that fits this description, encourage them to contact us, too.

We’re excited to hear from you!

And if you haven’t already, go to FaithlifeTours.com and sign up for the Faithlife Tours email list to be the first to know when the site launches!

4 Reasons Jürgen Moltmann Stands Out

It had been a long year. My family and I had weathered an unexpected and unwanted move, an expected and joyous birth, and a tragic and violent death. The year was a rollercoaster of extreme highs and lows. I was tired and hanging by a thread. Nevertheless, a new year brought new possibilities.

As I often do in times of trial, I turned to my theological teachers. This new year would be “My Year with Jürgen.” I set myself to reading or rereading the German theologian Jürgen Moltmann’s most important contributions to theology. I chose Moltmann for his clarity, insight, and deep reverence for God. He is a kindred spirit who has looked deeply into this earth’s pain and struggles and seen a world entirely embraced by God’s passionate love. We can live with the sure hope that “God will be all in all” (1 Corinthians 15:28).

Born in 1926 and raised in a secular family, Moltmann had a conversion of faith during World War II: In 1944, he was drafted into military service for the German army. He subsequently took his first opportunity to surrender to a British soldier. While a prisoner of war, he was given a copy of the New Testament and Psalms and was converted. Following the war, Moltmann took an active interest in theology and studied in Göttingen. He rose to prominence in 1964 with his epoch-making Theology of Hope, a theological tour de force that has redefined eschatological discourse in biblical and theological studies for the last half century. In the years following, Moltmann continued to write and teach, and he is widely recognized as one of today’s most significant theological minds. In the New Dictionary of Theology, well-known New Testament scholar Richard Bauckham describes Moltmann’s two earliest works, Theology of Hope and The Crucified God, as, respectively, “one of the most influential theological works of the post-World War II era” and “one of the most important modern studies of the cross.”

While the eschatology of Theology of Hope and the Christology of The Crucified God stand as Moltmann’s best-known contributions to theology, his overall program has several important contours.

1. Moltmann Is Eschatological

Strictly speaking, Theology of Hope is not a systematic treatment of the last things. Instead, it is the orienting of all theology toward eschatology. The resurrection of Jesus Christ is God’s promise for the world’s future. It opens us up to an eschatological hope. It was not until the Grawemeyer Award–winning The Coming of God arrived, in 1995, that Moltmann directly addressed the content of Christ’s coming. Eschatology is the matter of hope for God and God’s glory. It’s hope for the world’s new creation, for humans’ history with the earth, and for humans’ resurrection and eternal life.

2. Moltmann Is Christological

If the resurrection opened the Church toward God’s future, it is the cross and its expression of suffering love that opened the world up to God’s act of loving solidarity with all who suffer. The Crucified God describes the cross of Jesus Christ as an event within God in which Jesus experiences a Godforsaken death and the Father experiences the loss of his son. In the resurrection, this vicarious death brings life. Thus Moltmann is able to write, “The Cross is not and cannot be loved. Yet only the crucified Christ can bring the freedom which changes the world because it is no longer afraid of death.”

3. Moltmann Is Trinitarian

Moltmann is thoroughly Trinitarian in his approach. This is made explicit in the powerful demonstration of a social trinity in The Trinity and the Kingdom. More so, Moltmann is Trinitarian in method. His contributions to systematic theology do not follow the rigid delineation of theological topics found in textbooks. Typically, Moltmann takes a topic such as creation, eschatology, or the crucifixion and asks, “what does this mean for the person and life of the Triune God?”

4. Moltmann Is Pastoral

On occasion, modern theology is criticized for not being practical enough. This charge simply does not stick with Moltmann. Deeply influenced by World War II, the social revolutions of the ’60s, the growing ecological crisis of the ’80s, and Latin American liberation theologies, Moltmann understood the theological and the ethical as deeply intertwined. This is most evident in his most recent work, The Ethics of Hope. In some ways, The Ethics of Hope is a summation of his career up to this point. It gathers together nearly 50 years of teaching and writing and presents it in an ethical framework significant to individuals, churches, and governments.

You can get the best price right now on the new 22-volume Jürgen Moltmann Collection. The price will be going up to $319.95 on August 31, 2012. This is your chance to save $50—pre-order now!

Logos 4: Custom Keyboard Shortcuts for Highlighting

mp|seminars Tips Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris, who has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars, provides many training materials.

I’ve answered several emails related to the Logos Highlighting tool. This mark-up feature allows for user-created shortcuts, which save tons of time if you do a lot of highlighting. In case you’re not familiar with this time-saving tip, here’s how to create your shortcuts:

  • Choose Tools | Highlighting.
  • Click the arrow to the left of any pallet, such as Highlighter Pens.
  • Rest the cursor on the name of a style, such as Blue Highlighter.
  • Click the arrow drop-down list that appears to the right of the style name (A).
  • Click the Shortcut key drop-down list (B).
  • Click any letter, such as B for Blue Highlighter (C).
  • Repeat these steps for additional styles.
  • Close the Highlighting panel.
  • Select text in a resource.
  • Press a newly created shortcut keystroke, such as B for the Blue Highlighter.
  • Notice that your selected text is now highlighted in blue!

Highlighting-shortcut.jpg

I encourage you to create shortcuts for the styles you use most often. This way you can read, select text, and press one key to mark it up. You don’t have to keep returning to the Highlighting panel and clicking a specific style.

If you enjoyed this tip, please check out Timesaving Tips volumes 1 and 2.

Immerse Your Church in Abraham’s Story

Pastors have the great privilege of bringing their church together in Bible study. Yet unifying a church community around a solid, engaging curriculum can be challenging. It takes time and energy to put together a program that coordinates study for individuals, small groups, and preaching. That’s why Logos created Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum.

In addition to resources for small groups, the Complete Church Curriculum comes with sermon resources that provide solid teaching materials for Sunday mornings and Wednesday nights.

Eight sermon outlines form the core of curriculum. Designed to complement the small group lesson plans, the sermon outlines equip you to preach Abraham’s story. Beautifully crafted, the sermons reinforce the material found in the book version of Abraham: Following God’s Promise. And the week’s small group lesson can be brought to life Sunday morning with expanded material focusing on exhortation and application as well as interpretation and theology.

Each sermon includes a teaching slideshow. With graphics, Scripture passages, and reflection questions, the slideshows help you communicate your sermon visually. Thumbnails of each slide appear within the sermon outline, providing a visual reference for you as you preach [see an example]. The slideshows are customizable so that you can shape content and tone to fit your message. Available for PowerPoint, Keynote, and Proclaim, they’re easy to use right out of the box.

The Complete Church Curriculum also includes sermon outline handouts for you to distribute to your congregation for note taking. In addition, an introductory sermon video and a graphics set give your staff the tools they need to advertise the sermon series.

The Complete Church Curriculum satisfies the need for a biblically sound and theologically balanced curriculum that serves everyone: pastors, small group leaders, and congregants. It seamlessly unifies congregations in a group-study experience. It not only saves pastors the time and energy spent in research, writing, and coordinating—it enables them to spend more time pursuing other important aspects of ministry. Satisfy your church’s curriculum needs by getting Abraham: Following God’s Promise: Complete Church Curriculum today.

The Lexham Bible Dictionary: A Growing, Dynamic Resource

In March, Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. announced that, after publishing encyclopedias for the last 200 years, they would not be printing books any longer. With information changing so rapidly, their encyclopedias were obsolete as soon as they were printed. Instead of focusing on physical books, Encyclopædia Britannica made the decision to focus on digital editions.

The beauty of electronic resources is that they don’t have to be static—they can be dynamic and flexible! As a world leader in electronic publishing, we’ve known this for a while. Take, for example, the Lexham Bible Dictionary.

The Lexham Bible Dictionary includes more than 1,500,000 words in 2,700-plus articles from over 250 different contributors. Not only can you expect in-depth, scholarly content—you can count on new articles and additions to existing articles developed in response to new discoveries, perspectives, and controversies. With the Lexham Bible Dictionary, you’re getting the latest information and the freshest perspective.

The Lexham Bible Dictionary is part of the bundle of resources that come with the Faithlife Study Bible. And you can get the Faithlife Study Bible for free with the coupon code FREE—through March, 2014. Once you download the Faithlife Study Bible, the Lexham Bible Dictionary will be part of your Bible study notes and a stand-alone resource you can access through Logos 4, with our mobile apps (iOS and Android), and on Biblia.com.

Use the coupon code FREE and get the Faithlife Study Bible now!

How to Raise Money in a Meaningful Way

Youth workers are always trying to come up with that perfect fundraising idea. But how many car washes can you do? How many candy bars can you sell? Bake sales? Raffle tickets? In the end, you might raise enough money to go on a mission trip and change lives—but what if you could change lives while you were raising that money, too?

Improve the Way You Raise Funds

Logos has created Youth Group Fundraiser (YGF), a program that not only equips you to raise the money you need for awesome ministry events, but also makes a lasting impact in your students’, leaders’, and congregation’s spiritual lives.

What’s more, it’s free.

With YGF, we’ve taken three tried-and-true fundraising methods and combined them with an extremely successful profit-share presentation. One of our regional presenters puts on the presentation at no cost to you. And if you live in a region where presenters aren’t available, you can use our conference presentation video—the same video we show to rapt conference audiences worldwide.

With each Logos Bible Software purchase, your ministry will receive up to $250, and your congregation will enjoy a steep discount. You’ll provide your supporters, volunteers, teens, and congregation with the tools they need to take their Bible study to the next level.

Fundraising Simplified

What really makes YGF work is all the difficult preparation we’ve already done for you. Don’t know where to start? Our trained event representatives will help you build momentum, and our step-by-step calendar will keep you organized. What about promotional materials? We’ve created your posters, flyers, and PowerPoint slides. With the Youth Group Fundraiser content and calendar, you’ll put on a stellar event with very little effort.

Get your free fundraiser kit now at the Youth Group Fundraiser page and start building funds—and changing lives.

Get the Resources You Want at Incredible Prices

As lots of Logos users will tell you, Pre-Pub is a terrific way to pay less for more! Unfamiliar with the Pre-Pub program? This short video explains it well.

Use the Pre-Pub page’s faceted browsing to see the newest, best-selling, and lowest-priced products available. Or search Pre-Pubs by progress—from the products shipping soonest through the ones still building interest.

Speaking of products shipping, the following Pre-Pubs ship this month.* Don’t miss your chance to get the best deals on some fabulous resources!

Shipping August 17

Shipping August 22

Shipping August 23

Shipping August 27

Shipping August 30

Explore our Pre-Pub page today and, while you’re there, sign up to keep abreast of every new Pre-Pub with our Pre-Pub email list, which you can also access from the notifications page. You can also sign up for Pre-Pub updates on Twitter!

*If you hurry, you can still get in on the Pre-Pubs shipping today (August 15, 2012)!

Greek Apocryphal Gospels: Full English Translations!

I know. I can hear the groaning already.

Greek Apocryphal Gospels? Rick, I thought we were done hearing about that. Really, why keep bringing it up? This stuff isn’t in the Bible, so why mention it so often?”

True, it isn’t in the Bible. But that doesn’t mean it has nothing to do with biblical studies. These are some of the earliest evidences we have of how folks were using (what we consider to be) the canonical New Testament text. They were harmonizing it, using it for sermons, expanding upon it, and sometimes even adding their own stories (or stories that had been handed down outside of the NT). This is cool stuff, and it’s important for really getting a grip on how early Christians viewed and used the New Testament text!

That, and I wanted to give an update to those who have already pre-ordered the Pre-Pub because the scope of the project has expanded—but the pricing hasn’t gone up (yet).

So, what’s changed? Of course, you would know all of this if you joined or followed my Greek Apocryphal Gospels group* on Faithlife.com, but for those of you who haven’t done that yet, here’s the list.

English Translations of Fragments and Agrapha

I’ve translated (or included existing translations) of all the fragments and agrapha. This means—at least for the fragments and agrapha and some of the fragmentary and known gospels (Gospel of Peter and Gospel of Mary fragments, as well as the Greek fragments of the Gospel of Thomas)—English translations will be available. So you will be able to use this resource even if you can’t read or work through the Greek text.

Expanded Fragment Coverage

In addition to providing translations, I’ve also expanded the list of fragments that are included. The initial Pre-Pub listed the following fragments:

  • P.Egerton 2
  • P.Oxy 840
  • P.Oxy 1224
  • P.Cairo 10735
  • P.Merton 51
  • Fayum Gospel Fragment (a.k.a. P.Vindob.G 2325)

In researching the fragments and writing the introduction to the fragments, however, it became clear that some more fragments really should be added. Some of these were not included initially because transcriptions were not in the public domain, and also because images of the fragments were not available for transcription. I’ve since located clear, readable images of certain fragments, so the list is longer. Here are the added fragments:

  • Dura Parchment 24
  • P.Berol. 11710
  • P.Köln 255, which is the bottom corner of fragment 1 of P.Egerton 2
  • P.Oxy 210
  • P.Oxy 5072

Lots of new stuff, all of it interesting.

When will it be done?

That’s a great question. And the answer is: I don’t really know. The Greek text of the longer Gospel material (Infancy and Passion gospels) is still being worked on (initial capture); the morphological analysis will come after that. I have the bibliography together, though I have occasionally added  new entries as the introductions have been written. I’ve written drafts of introductions to the agrapha and fragmentary material (over 40 pages of single-spaced text thus far, with footnotes), and I’m moving into the Gospel of Peter next.

Convinced yet? Check out the Pre-Pub page for the list of stuff included. That, and check out some of the previous posts I’ve written about the Greek Apocryphal Gospels, Fragments, and Agrapha:

 

*Make sure you have a Faithlife user account—you can sign in with your Logos.com account. Then simply join the Greek Apocryphal Gospels group (button to the right of the group name) to get involved with the discussion!

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