Now on Pre-Pub: Baker Academic Bible Interpretation Collection

Logos recently put the Baker Academic Interpretation Collection (10 vols.) on Pre-Pub. Included in this collection is Greg Beale’s A New Testament Biblical Theology: The Unfolding of the Old Testament in the New. Weighing in at 962 pages—not counting indexes or bibliography—Beale’s book is a New Testament tour de force.

Beale argues that the story of the Bible must be understood through the lens of an already/not yet eschatology, with a specific emphasis on the new creational reign of God through the death and resurrection of the Messiah. From Genesis’ Eden all the way to the New Eden in Revelation 21–22, Beale masterfully connects the eschatological dots. To give you a taste of what A New Testament Biblical Theology is about, let me highlight a few key points.

Not Your Typical New Testament Theology

While Beale calls his work a “New Testament” theology, it can almost be classified as a biblical theology. Beale himself admits as much when he describes his method as “overlapping in some degree not only with whole-Bible theologies but [. . .] with Old Testament biblical theologies as well.” The beauty of this book is Beale’s Old Testament acumen. He devotes over 100 pages to tracing the storyline of the Old Testament, preparing the reader for the heart of New Testament theology.

Beale first establishes the “canonical storyline of the Old Testament,” then spends the remaining chapters “moving [toward the] eschatological goal.” His discussions of “centers” (i.e., the main themes of the Bible) and “storyline” (i.e., a unified storyline with multiple themes) are helpful for understanding not only his approach, but also the various approaches of Old and New Testament theologies. Because his “storyline” approach doesn’t force him to work within one theme, Beale is free to weave a multifaceted biblical theology.

Inaugurated Eschatology (The Already and Not Yet) and the New Creation

The emphasis on inaugurated eschatology is at the heart of A New Testament Biblical Theology. According to Beale, “we should think of Christ’s life, trials, and especially death and resurrection as the central events that launched the latter days. These pivotal events of Christ’s life, trials, death and resurrection are eschatological in particular because they launched the beginning of the new creation and kingdom.” Beale concludes that “the end-time-new-creational kingdom has not been recognized sufficiently heretofore as of vital importance to a biblical theology of the New Testament, and it is this concept that I believe has the potential to refine significantly the general scholarly view of the eschatological already-not yet.”

Buy and Read This Book

Let me encourage you to go over to Logos and place your pre-order today! Everyone should read this magisterial New Testament theology.  A New Testament Biblical Theology will make you think hard about Scripture as you watch the story progress from Genesis’ Garden to Revelation’s new Garden.

Not only does this Pre-Pub contain Beale’s magnum opus—you get nine more volumes from the likes of

  • W. Randolph Tate
  • Joel B. Green
  • Craig L. Blomberg
  • And others

Don’t wait! This Pre-Pub is going fast. Order now!

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5 Responses to “Now on Pre-Pub: Baker Academic Bible Interpretation Collection”

  1. Doc B June 21, 2012 at 10:49 am #

    If Beale’s book is as important as you say (and I think it is), then why not unbundle it and make it more accessible?

  2. JRS June 22, 2012 at 8:53 am #

    Almost thou persuadest me … except for the bundle.

  3. Carl Lehman June 25, 2012 at 1:17 pm #

    I’d agree with Doc B – Please unbundle this work from the rest. I would love to buy Beale’s work, but I can’t afford the whole bundle.

  4. Alex Gibson June 28, 2012 at 3:30 pm #

    I too agree with Doc B as well as Carl L unbundle this work. I have read other work by Beale (You are what you worship) he’s an excellent author. As always I can buy this book in print, but I would like to have it in Logos 4.

    • Greg Stanley June 28, 2012 at 3:43 pm #

      Let me add my “Amen” to these other brothers. It does seem like an important work. I’d love to have it but find others in this bundle less appealing and usable to me. Also I can’t justify spending $200+ at this particular time. Why not consider offering Beale’s work as a stand-alone tool? Please consider it.