Archive - April, 2012

Logos to Translate Works of Thomas Aquinas into English for the First Time!

Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) is certainly one of the most important theologians in history. His immense corpus of work covers every aspect of Christian life and doctrine, penetrating to the core of mankind’s relationship with God. Despite its undeniable importance, much of Aquinas’ work remains available only in Latin. That’s about to change. Logos is going to translate his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, Commentary on the Prophet Isaiah, and Commentary on the Prophet Jeremiah into English.

Aquinas wrote three major works of theology. His Summa Theologica (1265–1274) and Summa Contra Gentiles (1264?) have been available in English for almost a century. But his third major piece, his Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, remains untranslated. Aquinas wrote the Commentary on the Sentences in his twenties as a brand new professor at the University of Paris. The commentary influenced his contemporaries and remains heavily cited by modern theologians. In it, Aquinas broached topics that would dominate his later works, such as the relationship between Aristotelian philosophy and theology. It also offers Aquinas’ most sustained treatments of ecclesiology and sacramental theology.

Translating these works is an extensive, expensive project; that’s where the Logos Pre-Pub system comes in. We can bring together thousands of people from around the world to finally make these resources available in English. This translation will be a major event in Thomist studies, and everyone who places a pre-order is a direct part of it.

Logos’ translations of the commentaries on Jeremiah and Isaiah will likewise have a large impact on the study of Aquinas’ thought. Aquinas is gaining attention as more scholars realize that his thought was built on a profoundly scriptural foundation. Indeed, some scholars have suggested that our whole interpretation of Thomas’ work must be re-visited in light of his biblical commentaries. Logos’ translations of the commentaries of Jeremiah and Isaiah will be a huge contribution to these exciting developments.

Thomas Aquinas’ thought is remarkably valuable, and it is amazing that after 750 years so much of it remains inaccessible to the majority of English speakers. Logos is remedying this. You can help! Place your Pre-Pub orders today.

Save 75% on Logos March Madness Champion N. T. Wright!

After a 3-week tournament with 64 authors and nearly 200,000 cumulative votes, you’ve voted N.T. Wright the champion of Logos March Madness! He may have got the votes, but you’re the real winner—right now you get 75% off a selection of N.T. Wright’s works. Use coupon code 7MM12 to get the deals.We’ve also discounted a selection of runner-up, D. A. Carson’s works by 60%. Use coupon code 6MM12 for these deals.

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Help others find the best deal; tell us which winning resources you would recommend!

Free Book of the Month: John Bunyan’s Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners

John Bunyan’s classic Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners is April’s Free Book of the Month!

“. . . as I was sitting by the fire, I suddenly felt this word to sound in my heart, I must go to Jesus; at this my former darkness and atheism fled away, and the blessed things of heaven were set within my view.”John Bunyan

John Bunyan, one of history’s most prominent Puritans, traces his own spiritual pilgrimage in Grace Abounding. He describes his trials, temptations, and sorrows, as well as how he came to rely on Christ for his every need.

Bunyan penned Grace Abounding while he was imprisoned (for preaching without a license), as a letter of encouragement to his congregation, Bunyan’s story of conversion continues to encourage Christians today.

You can get this book for free all month long, and when you visit the Free Book of the Month page, you can enter to win the 61-volume Works of John Bunyan Collection.

Visit the Free Book of the Month page to download your free book and enter the giveaway!

Jesus’ Final Week: A Closer Look

Logos Talk will be bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you’d like more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Jesus and his disciples entered Jerusalem and spent the night in Bethany (Mark 11:11). Jesus knew that he would be arrested, tried, and crucified later that week. How does he use this last stretch of time?

  • He curses the fig tree (Mk 11:12-14, 20-25; Mt 21:18-22)
  • He cleanses the temple (Mk 11:15-17; Mt 21:12-13; Lk 19:45-46)
  • He teaches in the temple (Mk 11:27-12:12; Mt 21:23-22:14; Lk 20:1-19)
  • He predicts the destruction of the temple and last things (Mk 13:1-37; Mt 24:1-25:46; Lk 21:5-36)
  • He is anointed in Bethany (Mk 14:3-9; Mt 26:6-13; cf. Jn 12:1-8 and Lk 7:37-39)

Have you ever noticed how many of Jesus’ parables are taught during this week? How about the growing frequency of interactions he has with authorities in Jerusalem?

When I step back and look at it all (through the lens of hindsight), it looks like Jesus is preparing himself and his disciples for his crucifixion and resurrection.

Jesus in the Temple

Jesus cleanses the temple and heals people who need help. For this, the authorities hated him even more.

After this, Jesus engages in a “stump-the-teacher” session with all sorts of folks, answering questions about paying taxes, resurrection, and the greatest commandment. And those are just the questions we know about. I don’t know about you, but I get the sense that many of these questions were tests to see how good Jesus was. Sort of how we all (whether we admit to it or not) have “test passages” we like to use when examining commentaries or study Bibles. Jesus passed this questioning with flying colors, of course, because he is Jesus. If someone had questions about Jesus and what he taught, that person’s larger concerns may have been answered by this session.

So Jesus and his disciples leave the temple area. After his disciples respond in awe to the size and beauty of the temple complex (Mk 13:1), Jesus says that it will all be destroyed (Mk 13:2). He was beginning to focus them on the gospel that really matters instead of the magnificent architecture and beauty of human effort.

The Mount of Olives

From here he goes on to the Mount of Olives (Mk 13:3-37; Mt 24:1-25:45, called the “Olivet Discourse” by some) and begins to talk about end times. Jesus’ prophecy can be paraphrased: “Horrible, unthinkable things will happen, and then it’ll get worse. Help those who need help. Watch and be ready for my return. It’ll happen; I will be back.”

Afterward, in Bethany, during dinner at Simon the leper’s house, a woman, nameless in Matthew and Mark (Mk 14:3-9; Mt 26:6-13), dumps a bunch of expensive perfume on Jesus’ feet. Jesus says she is helping prepare his body for burial. That’s very weird for us to read—imagine what the folks at dinner were thinking! But Jesus said it was a beautiful thing.

Yes, I think Jesus was getting ready for his crucifixion, and he was getting his disciples ready, too. Take some time today or tomorrow to look at the steps he took and the things he taught, and let Jesus get you ready to experience his death, and (praise God!) celebrate his resurrection.

Leave us a comment and tell us how you’re remembering Jesus this week, and check out our special Holy Week resources.

The Pathway to Glory: The Triumphal Entry

Logos Talk will be bringing you special Holy Week devotionals from a number of authors. If you are looking for more resources to prepare your heart for Easter, Logos has discounted a number of Holy Week titles.

Today’s guest blogger is Thomas Black, a Logos Forum MVP and a Pastor in Moweaqua, Illinois.

The Pathway to Glory—John 12:20–36

Everybody wants glory, but not everyone is willing to pay the price required to attain it. Jesus’ path to glory was not through teaching, preaching, healing, or any of the works he did during his earthly ministry. His path to glory led through the grave.

In his gospel account of the triumphal entry, John ends with a hyperbolic grumble from the Pharisees; “the entire world” was going after Jesus. The Greeks step in almost as evidence, seeking an audience with Jesus through Philip. Philip in turn goes to Andrew, and they go as one to Jesus. At the very least, their arrival provides an opportunity to proclaim that the hour that Jesus has been talking about has finally come—the hour of his glorification. But this begs the question: If the triumphal entry was not the glorification of Jesus, then what was?

The answer lies in the parable about the seed of wheat: it must die in order to bear fruit (Jn 12:24). When He reflects upon His own desire to run away from the hour placed before Him (Jn 12:27), He immediately rejects it as an alternative. The very reason he had come was glorification, and that glorification required the grave.

That which is true of Jesus is also true of those who follow Him (Jn 12:26). For a disciple of Jesus Christ, the pathway to glory is not in proclaiming excellent sermons, or writing brilliant papers in seminary. Neither is it discipling hundreds or even thousands of people. The pathway to glory is dying to self that we might live in Christ.

The pathway to glory for Jesus and the pathway to glory for those who follow him is the same: we must die in order to live.

What does it mean to die to self? What are some practical steps towards taking up our cross and following Jesus (Lk 9:23)? Leave us a comment with your thoughts!

Check out our special Holy Week resources.

Logos 4: Instant Concordance for Any Resource

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

In the daily devotional, My Utmost for His Highest, Oswald Chambers refers to Abraham in the entry for March 27. After reading and reflecting on this passage, I wondered to myself if Chambers mentions Abraham elsewhere in My Utmost. I discovered the answer was just a right click away as I followed these simple steps:

  • Right click on the word Abraham . (1)
  • Select Selection Abraham | Search this resource. (2)(3)

The search panel opens revealing 24 hits in 11 articles. I spent a few minutes going through the hits enjoying a mini-topic study in this one book!

instant-concordance.jpg

Here’s what I want you to glean from this blog. The right mouse click doesn’t just provide an instant concordance for every Bible in our library, but for every book in our library! We don’t have to be in a Bible to enjoy the benefits of the right click “context sensitive” menu. Try right clicking in any book you’re reading to discover what else the resource has to say about your word or phrase (for phrase searching first select or highlight the phrase and then right click on the highlighted phrase).

For example, search for:

I think you’ll discover that seeing what a specific resource or author says about a word or phrase can be quite rewarding.

What word or passage have you found to be the most interesting to study? Leave a comment and let us know!

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