Archive - March, 2012

An Interview with Dr. Ben Witherington III

I remember reading Conflict and Community in Corinth and enjoying it so much that I rushed out to buy and devour Grace in Galatia. Since then, the Socio-Rhetorical Commentary Series has become invaluable to my New Testament studies.

Logos recently added the 5-volume Ben Witherington III Collection to the growing list of resources available from Dr. Witherington. This collection offers sensitive insight into areas of doctrine and interpretation where discussions can become entrenched and contentious.

Some of the topics include:

  • Baptism
  • God’s sovereignty
  • Prophecy
  • Grace
  • The Lord’s Supper

After looking at the content in this collection, I was excited for the opportunity to interview Dr. Witherington.

Logos: What are the risks of reading the Scriptures through a particular dogmatic lens? Do you see any benefits?

Dr. Witherington: I honestly don’t see any benefits to reading Scripture through a dogmatic lens. Over and over again it leads to eisegesis rather than exegesis, a reading back into the text things that are not there and reflect a later era.  It’s called anachronism.

For example, I was having a conversation with a Greek Orthodox brother the other day who wanted to insist that Jesus’ dialogue with Nicodemus was about the Christian theology of baptism—”born of water and the Spirit.”  Besides the fact that historically such a conversation surely was unlikely to happen between two early Jews (after all, there was no church or Christian baptismal practice yet), there is the further problem that the very next verse explains that ‘water’ here refers to what happens at physical birth (flesh gives birth to flesh) and then Spirit is the one who produces “the new birth” or “being born again.”  The discussion is indeed about the necessity of conversion even for devout early Jews.

Logos: Many Christians are raised or educated within specific theological frameworks, each with its inherent strengths and weaknesses. Assuming that your tradition is orthodox, how do you maintain the tension of honoring your background while allowing Scripture the freedom to contradict and challenge your beliefs?

Dr. Witherington: I don’t think your primary concern should be with the theological tradition you are raised in. Your primary concern should be your faithfulness to God’s Word wherever that leads, even if it contradicts things you were taught. I think you should value your tradition but critique it in light of the Bible.

Logos: Theology often comes out of a wrestling match between the theologian, his presuppositions, and Scripture. Of the five books in the Ben Witherington III Collection, which one was the biggest wrestling match for you?

Dr. Witherington: Clearly, the most controversial one is The Problem with Evangelical Theology. In that book I argue that all Evangelical traditions are most apt to stretch Scripture or misinterpret it when they try to say something distinctive. In other words, all Evangelical traditions fall short of full conformity to Scripture—whether we are talking about Calvinism, Arminianism, Pentecostalism, Dispensationalism, or any other ism.

Logos: What part do other believers play in challenging the way we interact with Christ through Scripture? How do we stand on our convictions and challenge each other without getting contentious and divisive?

Dr. Witherington: I find it invigorating, a sort of “iron-sharpens-iron” situation, when orthodox Christians of varying views challenge and have friendly debates about things. It helps us see our strengths and weaknesses, and, if it is done in a charitable manner, can be helpful to all.  But the ruling principle is speaking what you see to be the truth in love, not in a partisan spirit. All persons who have a high view of Scripture have much to learn from each other, and we should all admit our knowledge is partial and incomplete. Humility pills should be taken all around when we discuss these things.

Logos: What projects are you currently working on?

Dr. Witherington: I am currently working on a college-level Introduction to the New Testament for Oxford University Press, and my wife and I are working on our fifth novel in our series of archaeological thrillers.  The last one came out last fall, entitled Corinthian Leather, and has been well reviewed.  The next one is called Roma Aeterna, and centers on finding the tomb of the apostles Adronicus and Junia.

Logos: Thank you Dr. Witherington for taking the time to talk to Logos Talk.

You can save nearly $60 on the Ben Witherington III Collection (5 vols.) while it’s on Pre-Pub, or check out other Ben Witherington resources on Logos today!

Let’s Get to Know Each Other Better

Logos Bible Software strives to be approachable; the more we get to know you, the better we can serve you.

There are all kinds of ways for us to get to know one another. You can leave us comments on the blog, email us at suggest@logos.com, comment in the forums and our Facebook page, or contact us via Twitter, and this is just the tip of the iceberg. Your feedback makes us a better company.

We also have a user survey which helps us understand your needs and serve you better.

One more simple way to help us know you better is to customize your profile page.  By providing information like gender and birth date, we are better able to cater your experience to you. We use your statistics to improve quality, provide support, and increase ease of use. And don’t worry—we don’t share private statistics with anyone.

Public information like bios, personal websites, and denominations has been helpful for building community in the forums. In fact, I follow a couple blogs that I found on forum user’s profile pages. If it hadn’t been for the profile pages, I might never have benefited from these users’ websites.

So take a few minutes and check out our privacy policy; then update your profile page. We look forward to offering you the best experience possible.

Save 35% on 16 Authors with Logos March Madness

Round 2 of Logos March Madness is over, and the competitors have been halved again. You can now use the coupon code 2MM12 to save 35% on 16 authors. Check out the available titles from Round 2 today!

Now on to the Sweet 16!

Voting will run until midnight, Sunday, March 25.

Vote soon to give your favorite author a head start. Winners will see at least a 45% discount on a selection of their works, so share the page and tell your friends who you’re pulling for!

Who do you hope will win? Leave us a comment or send us a tweet @Logos with your pick!

New Counseling Resources Are Available Individually

The Biblical Counseling Collection contains tons of practical counseling resources. We’re talking about 30 volumes by 20 authors from 12 different publishers! This is a fantastic collection of resources for both counselors and pastors.

Interested in particular volumes, but not the whole series? You’ll be happy to learn that these titles are now available separately.

If you’re looking for specific types of counseling resources, the contents of the Biblical Counseling Collection can be broken into these categories:

General Counseling

Spirituality

Life Issues

Marriage

Women’s Interests

Men’s Interests

You’re going to save more (nearly $100) by buying the whole Biblical Counseling Collection. But if you have been eyeing some of these titles separately, they are available for you to purchase today.
Curious about other collections we have recently broken up? Find out which collections are available as individual titles!

Searching through Logos’ Free YouTube Tutorials


A couple of weeks ago we showed you how to find free Logos help on YouTube by sharing some of the YouTube playlists we’ve created.

But what if you’re looking for a quick tutorial on a specific feature? Searching the Logos YouTube channel is simple. All 300 videos in our YouTube library are titled and tagged to help you find exactly what you’re looking for.

To run your search, find the search bar in the upper right hand corner of the channel (1). Type in the topic or feature you’d like to learn more about, and click “Enter”. Any videos relevant to your search will appear below.

By default, your search results are displayed collectively (2). If more than one video appears, there may be a series on that topic or feature. Try sorting your search by Playlists (3). Some tools and features have their own playlists, like “Searching in Logos 4” or “Notes and Reading Lists.”

Try doing a search on these popular features, and begin mastering your software today!

Basic

  • Reading Plans
  • Passage Guide
  • Searching

Advanced

  • Customizable Guides
  • Drawing Mode
  • Dynamic, Rule-based collections
  • Tags

Also, check out these new playlists:

Have a favorite Logos video? Let our readers know about it in the comments!

Step into Theology with This Zondervan Collection

Theology is rewarding, but often intimidating. Words like hamartiology, soteriology, and ecclesiology can be formidable hurdles to someone new to theological study. If you can relate, the Zondervan Theology Collection may be right up your alley.

The seven volumes in the Zondervan Theology Collection aren’t “beginner” theology; they are approachable books full of deep and practical theology for everyone. Whether you have been studying theology for years or you are just getting your feet wet, this collection will inform and inspire you.

The Christian Faith: A Systematic Theology for Pilgrims on the Way by Michael S. Horton is a shining example. This systematic theology proves that scholarly illumination doesn’t have to come at the expense of accessibility. This isn’t just a theological primer (the print version is over 1,000 pages); Horton unpacks all of the traditional categories of systematic theology in six parts:

  • Part 1: Knowing God: The Presupposition of Theology
  • Part 2: God Who Lives
  • Part 3: God Who Creates
  • Part 4: God Who Rescues
  • Part 5: God Who Reigns in Christ
  • Part 6: God Who Reigns in Glory

“Dr. Horton has produced a remarkable work. His approach to systematic theology is fresh and critically needed in our time. Every pilgrim will profit from this work.”—R. C. Sproul, chairman and president, Ligonier Ministries

In the Zondervan Theology Collection, scholars like Andreas KostenbergerWayne Grudem, and D. A. Carson will walk  you through the basics of the Christian faith as well as recent hot button issues.

If you want practical content by well-known scholars, the Zondervan Theology Collection belongs in your library. Place your order today while this collection is still on Pre-Pub!

Logos 4: Locate Hebrew or Greek Synonyms for a Biblical Word

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos seminars and provides many training materials.

mp|seminars Tips

A Logos user recently emailed this question to me:

Is there a way I can search the Bible to find every synonym for “sin”?

The answer is a resounding yes and we get to use one of my favorite Logos features: the Translation ring in the Bible Word Study.

  • Choose Guides | Bible Word Study.
  • Type sin in the Word box. (1)
  • Press the Enter key to generate the report.

The Hebrew Words and Greek Words sections display all of the Hebrew and Greek words translated sin in the Bible of your choice (as indicated on the blue section title bar). In essence these are the synonyms for sin in the Bible. Of course this exercise is not picking up Hebrew and Greek words translated trespassoffence, etc. which also could be synonyms for sin.

  • Click a Hebrew or Greek word outside the ring to list the verses in which that word is translated sin. (2)
  • Click the Hebrew or Greek lemma next to the word count to generate a report for that word. (3)

Notice the Translation ring in this second report displays the various ways this Hebrew or Greek lemma is translated in English, again in the Bible of your choice. (4)

BWS-for-Sin.jpg

By going around the Hebrew and Greek rings in the first report, we can open additional Bible Word Study reports for each word, thereby being well on our way to a biblical understanding of the original concept, in this case sin.

How do you use the translation ring in the Bible Word Study tool? Leave a comment and let us know!

Logos March Madness: Round 2 Begins Today!

After a week of fierce face-offs, Logos March Madness: Round 1 voting has closed, and the number of competitors has been cut in half. Now you can save 30% on about 200 titles from the 32 authors who didn’t move on to Round 2.

Use coupon code 1MM12 to receive the discount.

Vote for your favorite authors at LogosMarchMadness.com today. There were several very close matches in the last round, so increase the chances of seeing your favorites move to the next round by sharing the page and telling your friends who you’re pulling for.

The competition is heating up—vote and save today!

Set Your Price on St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland

There’s no better time than St. Patrick’s Day to announce the two-volume St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland collection on Community Pricing.

Kidnapped from Britain by Welsh pirates at the age of 16, Patrick spent six years in Ireland as a slave. He eventually escaped and returned home where he joined the church. After spending 12 years in a monastery, Patrick felt called back to Ireland.

As Patrick remembers it:

“I saw a man coming, as it were from Ireland. His name was Victoricus, and he carried many letters, and he gave me one of them. I read the heading: ‘The Voice of the Irish.’ As I began the letter, I imagined in that moment that I heard the voice of those very people who were near the wood of Foclut, which is beside the western sea—and they cried out, as with one voice: ‘We appeal to you, holy servant boy, to come and walk among us.’ “

Almost immediately after becoming a bishop, Patrick sailed back to Ireland. He  successfully won converts among the Gaelic Irish, even converting members of royal families. He established schools, set up churches, and developed clergy from among the natives who helped him to win even more converts.

For more than 600 years, missionaries from Ireland carried the gospel all around Europe, setting up missions in Scotland, Britain, Germany, Switzerland, and beyond. Throughout some of Europe’s darkest years, Patrick’s legacy shone bright.

Soon you’ll be able to add St. Patrick’s autobiography and writings to your Logos library. And with Community Pricing, you decide how much you want to pay. Place your bid on the St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland (2 vols.) today!

The Princeton Theological Review Is Now on Community Pricing

Just in time to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Princeton Theological Seminary’s founding, 443 issues of the original Princeton Theological Review are on Community Pricing!

Charles Hodge started this premier Christian journal in 1825 and its first run lasted over 100 years. Its contributors list reads like a theologian’s who’s who:

The Princeton Theological Journal has covered some of the most important subjects facing Christianity, including: evolution, slavery, biblical inerrancy, and education. The articles and authors are still widely cited today. Now Logos users can own every issue of The Princeton Theological Journal produced from 1825 to 1929. That’s 443 issues packed with theological insight from some of the nineteenth and twentieth century’s top Christian scholars. And with Logos, you can search each issue by topic, Scripture reference, or author.

You set the price!

It’s up to you. We’re putting this on Community Pricing, where you set the price. After you place your bid, there are all kinds of ways to get others on board and lower the price!

  • “Like” it on Facebook.
  • Tweet it.
  • Discuss it in the forums.
  • Email it to your friends and coworkers.
  • Write the link on a whiteboard at school.
  • Add a screenshot to your Pinterest board.
  • Make and wear a sandwich board.

The more people that get on board, the lower the price can go, so place your bid for The Princeton Theological Journal (443 issues) today!

Page 2 of 4«1234»