Seven Great Eschatological Resources

eschatology
Today’s guest post is by Kyle Anderson, from the Logos Bible Software electronic text development team.

“This is the end—for me the beginning of life.”

German pastor-theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer spoke these famous last words to his fellow prisons at the Flossenbürg concentration camp where he was imprisoned as a conspirator against the Nazi regime.

For Bonhoeffer, and many of us, the end of our earthly life is the beginning of an even greater journey: eternal life with God. But for most of us, figuring out what this means exactly is a bit trickier. To further complicate matters, Christian eschatology (the systematic study of the Last Things) is often full of rabbit trails, speculation, and esoteric biblical imagery. Finally, there are so many different biblically supported positions concerning Eschatology; it’s difficult to know where to even begin.

Hopefully this list will be a nice primer on resources that might aid you in your Biblical studies of eschatology.

  • George Ladd—The Last Things: An Eschatology for Layman

    The late Fuller Theological Seminary professor is best known for articulating the “now/not yet” nature of the Kingdom of God. God’s kingdom has been fulfilled within history in Jesus Christ but awaits its consummation at the end of history. In this volume, Ladd guides us through the Biblical witness concerning the End Times.

  • Loraine Boettner—The Millennium

    In this volume, Reformed thinker Loraine Boettner examines the relative merits, weaknesses, and Biblical support for the three three major positions concerning the Second Coming of Christ and the future of God’s Kingdom: amillenialism, premillenialism, and Boettner’s preferred position: postmillennialism.

  • Thomas Oden—Systematic Theology (3 vol.)

    Life in the Spirit, the third volume of Methodist theologian Oden’s towering systematic draws from the deep cistern classical Christianity in examining the work of the Holy Spirit in the life of the Church universal and the individual believer. Concluding with a discussion on eschatology, the Last Things are far from a theological addendum but instead includes both “the end and meaning of the whole of human history” (p. 371).

  • Thomas Aquinas—Summa Theologica

  • Thomas Aquinas—Catena Auraea: Commentary on the Four Gospels

    Eschatology as a discipline didn’t begin yesterday. We have much to learn from the past. Summa Theologica is an outstanding source for any topic, but is especially important for providing much of the basis for Roman Catholic thought over the last 700 years. As a compilation of Patristic commentary on the Gospels, Catena Auraea is unique in that it affords you to get a sneak peak on how the Church has historically interpreted the Gospel passages concerning the End Times.

  • Dictionary of Biblical Prophecy and End Times

    As a dictionary, J. Daniel Hays, J. Scott Duvall, and C. Marvin Pate have edited a simple but thorough tool that helps you both identify the terms and issues surrounding prophecy in the Bible. As you study those often obtuse passages concerning the Last Things, this will be a resource your reach for time and time again.

  • The Future as God’s Gift: Explorations in Christian Eschatology

    Not for beginnings, but as a collection of scholarly essays concerning related topics such as the nature of time, the practice of hope, and the future of creation you’ll have food for thought on the ways eschatology might shape our Christian faith and practice in the 21st century.

On Facebook? Join the Discussion

4 Responses to “Seven Great Eschatological Resources”

  1. Brent Little November 6, 2010 at 11:39 pm #

    We are doing a disservice to not mention two important works:
    the three volume set “The Theocratic Kingdom” by George Peters.
    Also “The Greatness of the Kingdom” by Alva J. McClain.
    Logos should be working fast and furious to get these two titles into electronic format.

  2. Barry Darnell - Pastor November 9, 2010 at 4:43 pm #

    Sorry you are not offering any pretrib litature in your Escatology.
    Those who read only one view will probably never dig deeper. :-(

  3. Jayson Bradley November 9, 2010 at 4:55 pm #

    Thanks for the comment Barry,
    I actually commissioned this blog post for others who were frustrated that recent highlighted theology collections were focused too much on dispensationalism and pre-tribulation theology. I can’t agree with your last sentence more and, to that end, we have resources from a variety of theological viewpoints.

  4. Bob von Allmen November 12, 2010 at 7:53 pm #

    I agree with Brent –I have these excellent volumes in my library and would like to have them in electronic format.