Logos 4: Compare Pericopes

mp|seminars Tips

Today’s post is from Morris Proctor, certified and authorized trainer for Logos Bible Software. Morris has trained thousands of Logos users at his two-day Camp Logos training seminars.

Most Bible publishers divide the books of the Bible into sections or pericopes. Examples of pericopes could be Birth of Jesus, Baptism of Jesus, Temptations of Jesus, and so on. Of course, different publishers section off the Bible differently. You can, however, see, side-by-side, the various biblical pericopes used by these publishers:

  • Choose Tools | Passage Analysis
  • Click Compare Pericopes at the bottom of the window
  • Enter a passage in the Reference box like Phil 1.1
  • Click the Pericope Sets drop down list
  • Select the Bibles you want to use in the report

Now in parallel columns you see pericope titles and divisions from the selected Bibles.

This report is very useful when you’re trying to perform various tasks such as:

  • Determining the outline or structure of a biblical book
  • Planning a preaching / teachingschedule
  • Writing an exegetical paper

Comments

  1. Donald L. Smith says:

    The periscope idea is nice, but I don’t understand the lack of the authorized KJV? (or perhaps I missed it in the set choices) Since it was the standard for nearly 350 years, why would you leave it out and only put in the more modern versions? There are a lot of us who believe the version based on the Textus Receptus is more trustworthy than the others. I would appreciate your consideration.
    Thank you,
    Don

  2. Donald L. Smith says:

    The periscope idea is nice, but I don’t understand the lack of the authorized KJV? (or perhaps I missed it in the set choices) Since it was the standard for nearly 350 years, why would you leave it out and only put in the more modern versions? There are a lot of us who believe the version based on the Textus Receptus is more trustworthy than the others. I would appreciate your consideration.
    Thank you,
    Don

  3. I don’t see Passage Analysis in my Logos4Mac Tools menu???

  4. Hi Gene,
    The Passage Analysis Tools are included in base packages from Original Languages Library and above. If you are interested in upgrading, we currently have discounts available due to our Logos 4 Mac release. Give our sales department a call at 800-875-6467, and they can let you know which discounts you qualify for.

  5. I gather the Passage Analysis is available only in certain higher versions of Logos 4. Maybe some day for me! Looks good nevertheless!

  6. Don,
    Yes, the Passage Analysis Tools are included in base packages from Original Languages Library and above. Our apologies for not mentioning this directly in the post. And like I mentioned above, we are currently running upgrade specials, so if you’re interested, this is a great time to save. Give our sales department a call at 800-875-6467, and they can let you know which discounts you qualify for.

  7. Don, the KJV translators did not break the translation into pericopes. It looks like the Passage Analysis tool looks at subject headings in biblical texts and assigns the pericope divisions on this basis. No such divisions exists for the KJV, so this is my guess as to why it’s not included. I doubt there’s any anti-KJV conspiracy :-)

  8. Norm Eddy says:

    Don, I looked at this myself and I assume it is because the original KJV or Authorized, due to their early date, did not include Pericopes since those came along much later in publishing. If you have Zodiates KJV Complete Word Study Bible it includes Pericopes for each chapter but not at any lower level. Also I would imagine selecting the the NKJV would give you Pericopes as close as possible to the KJV,.

  9. Dave Phillips says:

    Don,
    As far as I can tell the KJV isn’t broken down into into pericopes. There are certain editions of the KJV that have pericopes, but it doesn’t seem to be a part of the standard KJV. However, the NKJV has a pericope set, and it is included in the compare pericope tool!

  10. Donald re: authorized version.
    I hope this helps answer your question.
    As a longtime Logos user I don’t know what you mean about the “authorized version” question. I have at least 3 “versions” of the “authorized version” (also known as the KJV) in my Logos library. I am thinking that maybe your are referring to the 1611 version of the “authorized version” (KJV) which was the first of at least 7 editions/revisions of the present “authorized version” (KJV) published by many different publishers – one of the current “authorized version” being last revised in 1769. Logos goes so far as to tell us in the book description which version of the “authorized” version it is. For example 1 of mine is from the 1769 and 1 is from 1900.
    Also you may not be aware that because so many publishers publish (print) the “authorized version” (KJV) many of them have different formats in which they print their particular version – so what Morris is talking about here in terms of periscopes wouldn’t apply to some of those Bibles.
    Hope this helped.

  11. Louis J Swingrover says:

    This is awesome. So how can I learn more about these pericope sets? What if I want to look at the pericopes or parashot in the BHS and UBS or in particular MSS?