Syntax Searching for Everyone: Using Query Forms

Video Tutorial

This is the second in a series of three posts called “Syntax Searching for Everyone”. In this video, we’ll peek at syntax search Query Forms.

What, you don’t know about Query Forms?

You didn’t know that you can just select a search template like “Subject”, fill in a blank, and find all the places where a particular Greek word (or, even better, English) is the subject of the clause?

Well, shame on me for not telling you earlier. But you can. Here’s how.

[Note: The Query Form feature is only available to users who have the Andersen-Forbes Hebrew Syntactic Analysis, the OpenText.org Greek NT Syntactic Analysis, and the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament. The Andersen-Forbes and OpenText.org databases are in the Logos 4 Original Languages (LE) package and above; Cascadia is in the Logos 4 Scholar's Silver (LE) package and above.]

For other posts in this series, see:

Comments

  1. Jeff Jansen says:

    When I open a search box, I’m not getting the syntax tab, am I missing something?

  2. Dan DeVilder says:

    Kudos again, Rick! These sure are simple, yet powerful, tools. Its great to be able to type in English, but get the Grk word, too!

  3. Hi Jeff.
    Thanks for the question; I realized I forgot to update the post with information on which packages have the Syntax Search databases included.
    The Query Form feature is only available to users who have the Andersen-Forbes Hebrew Syntactic Analysis, the OpenText.org Greek NT Syntactic Analysis, and the Cascadia Syntax Graphs of the New Testament. The Andersen-Forbes and OpenText.org databases are in the Logos 4 Original Languages (LE) package and above; Cascadia is in the Logos 4 Scholar’s Silver (LE) package and above.
    If you have one of these packages, but don’t have the query form or syntax search capability in Logos 4, then our Customer Service team can probably help you get the problem resolved.

  4. Syntax searching has always (since Logos introduced it) been an incredibly useful feature. Now it is far more accessible. Excellent!

  5. Thanks, Dan!
    Remember, with the “English Word” feature, these are based on the in-context glosses of the Greek (from the “Lexical Value” line of the Lexham Greek-English Interlinear New Testament), so there isn’t a one-to-one relationship between the English word and the Greek word. But it is cool, and can be helpful when searching for something similar to one’s present context as an additional illustration or cross-reference.

  6. Thanks, Mike!

  7. Irving Salzman says:

    Thanks. Two things:
    1. In one of the examples in your video, you searched on the Greek term “basileia,” which of course, as you know, is the lexical form. I noticed that all of your returned hits on that search only included that same lexical form. How would you do that same search, but with the intent to find all forms (all cases, etc.) of the Greek (or Hebrew) lemma?
    2. Do you have any intention of eventually posting videos of syntax searching with the WIVU syntactical database in the SESB?